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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hey All,
For my own reference I have been working on a list of all species/morphs available in the U.S. I'm sure I missed some and there may be some repetition (I'm no expert by any means), but I thought some may appreciate seeing the list. I thought this would be the best section to put it in so new people could see how many choices there are. Please help fill in anything I missed (especially the obligates...way too much to remember). Note: some species may be listed under more than one genus...I am no taxonomist so I include them as they are described.
-Field

Adelphobates:
Adelphobates castaneoticus
Adelphobates galactonotus-Red, Yellow, Orange, Golden, Koi, Solid Orange, White
Adelphobates quinquevittatus

Allobates:
Allobates femoralis
Allobates zaparo

Ameerega:
Ameerega altamazonica-Juicungo
Ameerega bassleri-Black, Yellow, Blue, Chrome, Green
Ameerega cainarachi-Standard
Ameerega hahneli- Iquitos
Ameerega pepperi- Abiseo, Orange, Orangehead, Yellow/gold
Ameerega silverstonei
Ameerega trivatta-Green, Huallaga Canyon, Bajo Huallaga, Greenback

Dendrobates:
Dendrobates auratus- Ancon Hill, Black, Blue, Blue and Black, Camo, Campana, Capira, El Cope, Golden, Green and Black (Panamanian, Costa Rican, Nicaraguan, Hawaiian), Green and Bronze, Highland Bronze, Mebalo, Microspot, Pastores,Portobelo, Reticulated, San Felix, Super Blue, Toboga, Toboga Reticulated
Dendrobates leucomelas-Banded (Narrow, Wide), Fine-Spot, Green-Foot, Nominat,
Dendrobates tinctorious- Alanis, Azureus (Fine-Spot, Sky-Blue), Bakhuis, Boulanger, Brazilian Yellow Head, Cayenne, Citronella, Cobalt (French Guiana, Surinam, Brazilian), Ensing, Giant Orange/Regina, Inferalanis, Koetari, La Fumee, Lorenzo, Matecho, Monts Atachi Bakka, New River, Nikita, Oelemarie, Oyapok, Patricia, Powder Blue, Powder Gray, Sipaliwini (true, blue, green, yellow), Table Mountain, Yellow-Back.
Dendrobates truncatus-Blue, Yellow

Epipedobates:
Epipedobates anthonyi- Sarayunga , Salvias, Santa Isabel
Epipedobates tricolor- Buena Esperanza, Highland, Maraspunga, Rio Saladillo, Zarayunga,
Epipedobates trivittatus- Green (2-stripe, 3-stripe), Orange, Red

Hyloxalus:
Hyloxalus azureiventris-Standard

Oophaga:
Oophaga arborea-?
Oophaga granufilera- Quepos, Baru
Oophaga histrionica- Redhead
Oophaga lehmanni- Red, Yellow
Oophaga pumilio- Almirante, Bastimentos (Gold Dust, Green, Orange, Red, Yellow, White), Black Jeans, Blue Jeans, BriBri, Cauchero, Caya de Agua, Cayo Nancy, Colon, Cristobal (Red, Orange, Yellow), Darkland, El Dorado, Escudo-possibly a unique species (Red, Blue), Man Creek, Popa, Robalo, Rio Branco, Solarte (Red, Orange, White), Uyama, Yellow Belly
Oophaga sylvatica
Oophaga vincenti-?

Phyllobates:
Phyllobates terribilis- Gold ,Mint, Orange, Yellow
Phyllobates bicolor- Gold, Orange Black-Leg, Yellow Green-Leg
Phyllobates vittatus- Gold, Red
Phyllobates aurotaenia- Narrow Banded

Ranitomeya:
Ranitomeya benedicta
Ranitomeya fantastica- Caynarachi, Copperhead, Lowland, Nominat, White Banded
Ranitomeya flavovittata
Ranitomeya imitator- Baja Huallaga, Banded, Caynarachi Valley, Chazuta, Green, Green-Striped, Intermedius, Tarapoto, Varadero, Yellow, Yumbatos, Yurimaguas
Ranitomeya lamasi- Green, Highland, Panguana(Green-Leg, Orange)
Ranitomeya reticulata- Iquitos, Solid
Ranitomeya summersi-Sauce, Huallaga
Ranitomeya vanzolini
Ranitomeya variabilis- Highland, Old Line, Southern, Yellow
Ranitomeya uakarii- Tahuayo, Tamshiyacu
Ranitomeya ventrimaculatus- Amazonicus, Blackwater, Borja Ridge, French Guyana (Blue-Leg, Gray-Leg), Iquitos (Orange, Red), Peruvian Gold, Rodyll
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Don't forget P. lugubris
Thanks. Don't know how I forgot P. lugubris. Amended my main document (and alphabetized Phyllobates, I guess I ignored the whole genus or something)...will continue to update it as more people contribute and then post the finalized version.
 

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I was also wondering what a gold terribilis was. As far as the white footed histos, it depends on your definition of "available." There are surely more morphs of histos than just redheads here, but that certainly doesn't mean they are frequently available or seen for sale. Same with the red and yellow lehmanni you listed... I don't know if they are here in the states (someone might have them but I don't know; I'm not into who has what rare frogs and such) but if they are here, you're not going to see them listed for sale on the general classifieds.
Bryan
 
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Field its a good start, there are quite a few populations of some species you missed but I will pull the list we started a while back and send it to you. There are a few you missed, like Itaya and spotted retics, a few grannies not on there, Ive heard of there being two unrelated yellow terrib lines, orange and mint but not golds. a few you listed aren't actually here as far as a few tincs I see listed. And there are many more sylvaticus and histos here as well as lehmanni that you did not list. I will send you the list we worked on. Nice work. I guess it boils down to whether you mean readily available in the hobby, or actually in the hobby. In fact I know Mysties are here, many others most havent seen posted up here as well as a few un ID'd obligates show up now and then. Dont forget all those best guess's as well being imported. Technically they belong on a list of their own. Want to make it harder, do what we have started and add in the import years for each species and the amount brought in as far as what the paperwork shows.


Michael
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
Thanks for the input everyone. In order to create the list I looked over a bunch of U.S. breeders/sellers available lists to form this list...I have only spent a couple of hours working on this so far, so I am certain there will be mistakes (hopefully everyone will help identify these and make the list much better). I actually tried to be quite conservative in what I included on the list...it was hard not to use the morphguides to help flesh out the list, but I didn't want to include morphs that are not available. As I said before, I am far from an expert. A big part of the reason I did this was to educate myself (and because I had never seen a complete list before). I think that this could become an excellent resource for us all, but especially to illustrate to beginners just how many different darts there are available. So please keep reviewing it, tell me whats missing, tell me if you think something should be removed...all input is appreciated.

What is a "Gold" Terribilis?
The "Gold" reference came from Sean Stewarts site, but he has it listed as Phyllobates ssp.

Field its a good start, there are quite a few populations of some species you missed but I will pull the list we started a while back and send it to you. There are a few you missed, like Itaya and spotted retics, a few grannies not on there, Ive heard of there being two unrelated yellow terrib lines, orange and mint but not golds. a few you listed aren't actually here as far as a few tincs I see listed. And there are many more sylvaticus and histos here as well as lehmanni that you did not list. I will send you the list we worked on. Nice work. I guess it boils down to whether you mean readily available in the hobby, or actually in the hobby. In fact I know Mysties are here, many others most havent seen posted up here as well as a few un ID'd obligates show up now and then. Dont forget all those best guess's as well being imported. Technically they belong on a list of their own. Want to make it harder, do what we have started and add in the import years for each species and the amount brought in as far as what the paperwork shows.


Michael
Thanks a bunch Michael. I would truly appreciate it if you send me the lists you have, that would help so much. If don't know if you still have my email, so here it is: tlsmit6000[at]northgeorgia.edu. I went back and forth about including mystis because of their status (I know, the same could be said for plenty of others on the list), but I will go ahead and add them. Essentially I was hoping to record all species kept in the U.S. (even the really hard to get ones). Eventually I would like to make another list with the species/morphs that are available to European and Asian hobbiests. Maybe even make a list of all species/morphs (but this would take a lot of input from everyone). And yeah...organizing by import/year sounds pretty daunting, but I definitely believe that the effort is worthwhile and great for the future of the hobby. If there is anything I can do to help let me know (I'm not sure how much help someone with my limited knowledge would be, but I am totally willing to try).
 

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What about gulfito grannies? I know they are available.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks Okapi and Froggymike, both have now been added to the list.
Keep 'em coming everyone!
 

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Haha! Theres lots and lots of obligates in our hobby not stated yet....Ill just let other one by one state them....
 

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Chocolate leucs
Chocolate leucs are not a naturally occurring population in the wild like the others listed. They are a result of some mutation that happened in captivity, and shouldn't be bred just for this "chocolate" trait. If you are adding them to the list, by that reasoning you would also have to add every albino, melanistic, or selectively bred trait (i.e. "sky blue" azureus), and I think these shouldn't be included.
Also I think some of those tricolors you have listed are actually anthonyi... I know lots of people seem to use tricolor/anthonyi interchangeably, but I think there are only a couple of true types of tricolor here, though I could be wrong. One of the epipedobates guys should be able to clear that up.
Bryan
 

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Chocolate leucs are not a naturally occurring population in the wild like the others listed. They are a result of some mutation that happened in captivity, and shouldn't be bred just for this "chocolate" trait. If you are adding them to the list, by that reasoning you would also have to add every albino, melanistic, or selectively bred trait (i.e. "sky blue" azureus), and I think these shouldn't be included.
I am under the impression that sky blues were completely man made through selective breeding of individuals with a reduction of spots, increasing the lack of spots with every generation. Thus the f5 generation has much less spotting and more blue than the f1 generation.
If the information Ive received is correct, the first chocolates were born as F1s from a group of wild caught frogs from a single population. It stands to reason that the trait would also be present in that population in the wild if it was produced from them the first time they were bred in captivity. Line breeding from that generation on for increased brown is a travesty. Chocolates look the same now as they did in that f1 generation. Isnt that the goal with every line?
 

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Its actually the Osa/Golfito grannie locales and I believe also Palmar Norte. Field I believe its just a matter of what you want to list as in the US, Mysties are actually the only dart I know of that will get you in some serious trouble. They have never been legaly exported.

Keep in mind that auratus are a mess of a mix, there all multiple blue/black locales, green/bronze, blue/bronze as well as a few rarities like the white auratus Mark had a while back.
 

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Oh and I guess its up to the hobby on whether to consider listing the selectively bred frogs as to me its something most of the hobby is against, soon enough there could be extra green imis and grass green terribs to add to the list. I would think someone will end up demanding their outcrossed and hybrids to the list next.........
 

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I am under the impression that sky blues were completely man made through selective breeding of individuals with a reduction of spots, increasing the lack of spots with every generation. Thus the f5 generation has much less spotting and more blue than the f1 generation.
If the information Ive received is correct, the first chocolates were born as F1s from a group of wild caught frogs from a single population. It stands to reason that the trait would also be present in that population in the wild if it was produced from them the first time they were bred in captivity. Line breeding from that generation on for increased brown is a travesty. Chocolates look the same now as they did in that f1 generation. Isnt that the goal with every line?
You are correct about the sky blue azureus, that was just people manipulating the gene pool by selectively pairing them so that the frogs would produce azureus with reduced spotting.
I do not know the details of the chocolate leuc origins, but I know they come from standard leucs. If the wild caught adults were imported as chocolates, and they consistently produced chocolate leuc offspring, that would be another story. However, for them to come from standard parents suggests that it is simply a mutation within the "standard leuc" population. Maybe I didn't make the distinction clear before; I am not saying chocolate leucs are "bad" since, unlike fine spot azureus, they were a natural mutation. Whether or not they occur within the wild population doesn't mean it is a unique and separate morph; it is the same with an albino frog. I've seen people here with albino vents, auratus, retics, etc. and so I'm sure they also pop up in the wild population rarely (though they may not survive as easily out there...) but you don't see locales of only albino dart frogs, or an import of a few hundred albino frogs from one population.
Basically, although they may sometimes occur in the wild, they are not a unique population of just "chocolate leucs", but rather standard leucs with some mutations, which is why I'm saying I feel they don't fit in with the rest of the frogs on this type of list.
Hopefully that is a bit clearer than my previous post.
Bryan
 
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I am under the impression that sky blues were completely man made through selective breeding of individuals with a reduction of spots, increasing the lack of spots with every generation. Thus the f5 generation has much less spotting and more blue than the f1 generation.
If the information Ive received is correct, the first chocolates were born as F1s from a group of wild caught frogs from a single population. It stands to reason that the trait would also be present in that population in the wild if it was produced from them the first time they were bred in captivity. Line breeding from that generation on for increased brown is a travesty. Chocolates look the same now as they did in that f1 generation. Isnt that the goal with every line?
Baltimore pretty much covered it but, assuming that "chocolate leucs" are hypomelanistic (which is likely considering the way you describe their arrival), then that mutations behavior seems consistent with a single recessive gene mutation (1 allele that interupts or disallows melanin production at a stage of development) just like what is known in the hobby as albinism. Extreme animals like the "sky blue" Azureus look that way because of selective breeding has narrowed down multiple alleles to limited combinations.

So even though there is a MUCH greater chance that the hypo's would occur in the wild, it's not actually a different frog. It's your list, so define it how you like, but technically if you include hypomelanistic frogs then you should include known albino's, hypermelanistic, melanistic, leucistic, etc.

Feel free to correct me on any of the details, but that's the gist of it.
 
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