Dendroboard banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,987 Posts
There have been some threads on this subject:


Giving details of what animals you'll be housing, what plants, and exactly what goal you have for the illumination in the water would help you get useful recommendations.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,217 Posts
Those dimensions seem problemetic for every taxa i can think of quality of life wise. It corrals activity and forage to an unnatural extremis of vertical stricture.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
There have been some threads on this subject:


Giving details of what animals you'll be housing, what plants, and exactly what goal you have for the illumination in the water would help you get useful recommendations.
Thanks
Just fish. Mostly moss and a couple orchids in one of them. Got 2 sets of 6500 on each. The water is about 2 foot deep.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,987 Posts
So, you're looking for more light in the water just to view the fish? That shouldn't be too hard, but avoiding overlighting plants at the top might be, depending on what species you had in mind. Hopefully someone will come along with some hardware recommendations, or creative ideas.

From my POV, that first build just screams for a few blackwater fish (Pantodon buchholzi? Or a pair of Apistogramma?) and no plants. The darkness would be appropriate then.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
So, you're looking for more light in the water just to view the fish? That shouldn't be too hard, but avoiding overlighting plants at the top might be, depending on what species you had in mind. Hopefully someone will come along with some hardware recommendations, or creative ideas.

From my POV, that first build just screams for a few blackwater fish (Pantodon buchholzi? Or a pair of Apistogramma?) and no plants. The darkness would be appropriate then.
I like the idea thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
737 Posts
The key will be how focused the light is. You need a lens or reflector that restricts light down as small as possible. There are 25 degree LED flood lights available, I would definitely look into those. This is the most powerful bulb I ever tested. At 4 feet I got 100 ppfd/par.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,217 Posts
Please pardon my abrupt response i am sometimes a little robotic and forget that the topics have people behind them. I have strong opinions about arboreal 'vertical' designs that dismiss lateral scope.

Most rough spots in communication have one thing in common - not enough Information.

And i didnt before i replied.

I dont know much about orchids but surely you have designed an elegant home for them
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,217 Posts
Humid too, says my partner. And that seems excellent!
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,466 Posts
So, you're looking for more light in the water just to view the fish? That shouldn't be too hard, but avoiding overlighting plants at the top might be, depending on what species you had in mind. Hopefully someone will come along with some hardware recommendations, or creative ideas.

From my POV, that first build just screams for a few blackwater fish (Pantodon buchholzi? Or a pair of Apistogramma?) and no plants. The darkness would be appropriate then.
A pair of Apistogramma would LOVE that first tank.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
The key will be how focused the light is. You need a lens or reflector that restricts light down as small as possible. There are 25 degree LED flood lights available, I would definitely look into those. This is the most powerful bulb I ever tested. At 4 feet I got 100 ppfd/par.
Thanks I'll check em out
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Please pardon my abrupt response i am sometimes a little robotic and forget that the topics have people behind them. I have strong opinions about arboreal 'vertical' designs that dismiss lateral scope.

Most rough spots in communication have one thing in common - not enough Information.

And i didnt before i replied.

I dont know much about orchids but surely you have designed an elegant home for them
Much appreciated
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
136 Posts
Precious both. In my opinion, I would leave the lighting as you have it now. It has some very attractive light and shadow effects!
Very good work! Congrats! :giggle:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Precious both. In my opinion, I would leave the lighting as you have it now. It has some very attractive light and shadow effects!
Very good work! Congrats! :giggle:
Thank you
Im happy with it just not sure if it's too dark for the fish
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,466 Posts
Fish typically don't need much light.

Apistogramma species, for example, come from really dark streams/rivers , the water gets darkened by leached tannins.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
77 Posts
Can I just say that the first tank you just built is spectacular. I think with a tank that looks that awesome with just the hardscape, I wouldn't add too many plants. so light may not be a big deal. Some moss, a few low light plants on the horizontal branch. To help the bottom appear lighter so the fish and plants (real or fake) pop out, you may want to switch to a lighter color sand.

As for the light, if you want something to punch down as far as possible, I think you are going to want a COB with as tight a lens as possible. You may have to build your own or buy one and switch the 90 degree lens with something tighter like https://www.kiwilighting.com/36mm-flat-lens-for-cob-leds. Search something like "COB Grow Light Full Spectrum".
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top