Dendroboard banner

21 - 26 of 26 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
135 Posts
Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Wow, thanks everyone for all of the feedback! The only problem is that for mounting the light, I already made a custom lid, which was great and worked well (WITH a standard LED bulb). so the thing is, it’s not really meant for one of these aquarium lights. I could easily mount the NICREW light as it is and make no changes, but then the light would be very close (maybe an inch) from the top. So I could do that and just lower the brightness, but would that decrease PAR? Or I could modify the existing structure and have something that would allow me to mount it a couple inches (how many, IDK). So I think I’m just going to test out the light when it arrives. If it is too bright, I will either lower brightness or make a mount. Simple as that. Again, thank you everyone for all of the responses! It is good to constanlty get good advice from people who know what they are talking about :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
436 Posts
I could easily mount the NICREW light as it is and make no changes, but then the light would be very close (maybe an inch) from the top. So I could do that and just lower the brightness, but would that decrease PAR?
Yes. PAR is brightness in specific wavelengths that plants use.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Bit of a newbie, but with a Physics background I know a bit about light. Something to consider is that light follows the inverse square law. intensity is divided by the square of the distance. What this boils down to is if you double the distance from your light source to your subject you don't end up with half the light intensity, but only a quarter. And simmilarly, if you cut the distance in half from light source to subject, you don't get twice the intensity, but four times! Be aware that radiant heat works the same way.

I'm running a reptisun Nano Led bulb to light my 12x12x18 which uses four watts of power and puts out 450 lumens, but I'm gathering from what I've read that that's probably not bright enough. I have a 10w led green grow bulb from Josh's frogs that I might switch out.

Great thread, I'd also like a sense of how much light is too much for my tank or 18" square.

Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,799 Posts
The inverse square formula describes point source light, but not directional light that is focused by refraction (with lensing/'optics') or reflection.

For much of the lighting used in frog vivs (COB LEDs, no lensing), this won't matter quite as much, but for some it will -- that Reptisun LED has a decent looking reflector; the diffuser on InSitu's lighting does tighten up the light distribution quite a bit, according to my eyes; and aquarium-intended fixtures often use lensing (I use an AI Prime FW which has 80 degree lenses, for example).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Hello, I currently have a 5000k light and plan on getting bromeliads. I want a good light to get nice colors, so I planned on upgrading to a 6500k LED bulb. As of right now the 5000k looks a good white color, so Im wondering if 6500k would look too blue. everyone says that neorgelias need 6500k to get good colors. There are also people who say that 6500k is too unnatural looking. Is 6500k too blue? I want the tank to look nice to the eye. I don’t think that my 5000k LED is enough to color the neorgelias, so I think I have to upgrade either way. Any information? Here is a picture of the current 5000k 650 lumen LED in my tank THIS TANK HAS NO DART FROGS ONLY A FIRE BELLY TOAD
View attachment 298270 View attachment 298270
As someone who also keeps reef tanks, 6500K is still quite "white" to me, and it grows my plants well. I don't notice the "blue" until I go over 10000K. Guess that it's all a matter of perception. I agree with the others that PAR is a much more important parameter, and it can vary quite a bit due to the distance from the bulb, as well as the angle of incidence. The PAR that is quoted on any given bulb is only accurate at a spot directly under the light (as well as how much you trust the manufacturer). Unfortunately, a PAR meter can be pricey, and I find it to be unnecessary for vivaria. I have found that any bulbs that are recommended for freshwater planted aquaria do well for vivs. I use LEDs myself...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
135 Posts
Discussion Starter · #26 ·
It’s been a while, and I’ve gotten a solid understanding of lighting from these forums. The tank in the picture has gotten a NICREW brightLED, it’s 7500k which looked very blue to me since it replaced a 5000k bulb. Ive gotten used to it, and now it looks like a normal white. Now I plan on getting These lights for a 65g tank. I have learned PAR is very important, and there is some good news about PAR meters. Check out this Video - it wasn’t spot on, but it gives a very close estimate of the PAR
 
21 - 26 of 26 Posts
Top