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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I got a great surprise today friends of ours came to visit from texas and brang me 3 trash bags of live oak leaves. I was just wondering how long they will last if i can`t use all of them.They say they have a ton more but i don`t know how long they last per say. And what is the best way to store the leaves until they are used or perserved. Some of the leaves are still green from the tree would these be safe fro frogs while green?
Thanks for any info.
Darran
 

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Some people use them right off the tree, but I'm pretty sure the general consensus is that you want to treat them some how, be it baking or boiling. I personally bake all of mine before they go in a viv. I would imagine boiling shortens the life span of the leaf, but I'm pretty sure I've heard of people doing it.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
thanks for the tip. How long do you bake them for and at what temp?
Or do you boil then bake them?
darran
 

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I boil for 10-15 mins. I reserve some of the water to use in tad cups. I then bake (while still wet from the boiling) at 325 for 20-25 mins. I usually rearrange them a couple of times during the baking to let them dry evenly. After they cool I store them in gallon ziplocs.
 

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I pick my magnolia leaves and just bake them at 375-400 for 8-10 mins depending on how many leaves I'm baking. Can't say for sure this is correct, but I don't think much survives at 400 degrees when exposed for 10 mins. Not sure mag leaves make good tad tea so I don't bother to boil them.
 

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Pushing the temp up too high risks you setting your oven on fire. Most micro organisms can't stand their inner water boiling so anything around 220 or 250 will do. Boiling also works well but is a little harsher in the leaves. I personally use both boiling and baking.
 

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I store them dry and untreated, and boil before adding to viv's. Then I just throw them in wet (after they cool).

It's funny how us Northerners pay good money for detritus from the South... Our oak leaves just look so "temperate" in a dart habitat.
 

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I pick my magnolia leaves and just bake them at 375-400 for 8-10 mins depending on how many leaves I'm baking. Can't say for sure this is correct, but I don't think much survives at 400 degrees when exposed for 10 mins. Not sure mag leaves make good tad tea so I don't bother to boil them.

Magnolia leaves make an excellent tea,and the tadpoles tear up the leaves down to the skeleton.


Lou
 

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Moist sterilization is more effective than dry sterilization (which is why medical facilities use autoclaves which uses pressurized steam.) I would go with boiling first, or take a page out of Ed's book and use a pressure cooker.
 

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A pressure cooker or autoclave is the only trustable method of REAL sterilization. You can get autoclavable sealable bags and do 15 psi for an hour.
 

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All good suggestions here, but IMO overkill. When I harvest leaves (not pulled from the trees but rather after they've dropped), I put them in a deep sink filled with water too hot for me to put my hand in. Allow them to soak for ~15min then lay out to dry. Avoid storing them if they have moisture, hence the reason for waiting until they drop.
 
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