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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I’m going to be setting up a roughly 80 gallon corner tank as a paludarium and I’m wondering if it would be ok to put my Leucs in if I did roughly 1/2 or 2/3 land?
 

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It will increase the chances of a gram neg bacterial infection. Filtration and nitromonas/nitrobacter foster nonwithstanding.
 

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You might want to look into something that does better around a lot of water. Vampire crabs, maybe? I don't know if they're compatible with fish, or if you want fish in the first place.
 

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Newts. So underrated and really enjoyable to feed. Live forever practically.

Or Bombina orientalis. Bright colors, super active, cute call.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Would a crocodile skink work? Fish aren’t a necessity I’m originally a fish keeper until I got darts and now I’ve jumped into more amphibians/reptiles.
 

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Would a crocodile skink work? Fish aren’t a necessity I’m originally a fish keeper until I got darts and now I’ve jumped into more amphibians/reptiles.
That's a question best posed on a reptile forum where you stand a good chance of talking to a handful of keepers familiar with the species. I believe RFUK is still maintaining a good community.
 

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I've read somewhere that Leucs can actually swim. Is this true, or just frogger internet myth?
 

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I’m going to be setting up a roughly 80 gallon corner tank as a paludarium and I’m wondering if it would be ok to put my Leucs in if I did roughly 1/2 or 2/3 land?
I have kept leucs in a heavily planted paludarium with 3/4 land and open water for over 15 years with no problems at all. I add leaf litter to produce tannins in the water, tannins have an anti-fungal/anti-bacterial benefit. I use bags of leca under the land portion, with a small pump to increase water movement from the back to the front of the paludarium and a small filter in the open water section to keep the water surface gently moving. The plants roots have made their way into the water table over time, further enhancing the nitrogen cycle. Occasionally I remove a gallon or so of water and replace it with spring water. The advantage to having open water is that high humidity is constant, so spraying can be done by hand rather than installing a misting system. Hand spraying allows me to monitor the health of my frogs regularly. They always know that feeding follows spraying, so they come forward for me to assess their condition, and to make sure they are eating enough. They eat a lot.
The terrestrial portion is bioactive, with springtails and isopods. Once in a while I need to add a little ABG mix and catappa leaves, and prune the plant growth. In an established paludarium little maintenance is required. Once in a while a Leuc will voluntarily enter the water for a bit, they will even take fruit flies off of the surface of the water at times. My water /land interface includes java moss growing on bogwood and cork, so entering or exiting the water is easy for the frogs. To be clear, this is not a breeding set up. I only keep dart frogs for their beauty and behavior, the plants are almost as important as the frogs are to me.
When your frogs stop climbing on the glass, they are telling you that you have created a great environment, that they are comfortable in your care. Best of luck to you!
 

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I have kept leucs in a heavily planted paludarium with 3/4 land and open water for over 15 years with no problems at all.
Yes, I think it can be done well. But, if you have the skills to pull it off you are not asking basic questions on this forum.
Think it was a great question to ask on the forum -- we all start at low skill level and get better because we communicate. Thank you leefers1 for the excellent response with details on how to make it work.
 
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