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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Okay, I've read many threads about other females in a tank eating the others eggs, but I didn't think that a male would do that since I had never read about it.

I had in a previous post asked what possibly a second male was doing with eggs that had been laid and fertilized by another male. Some responded that they thought he might be trying to fertilize them himself.

Well, he only messed up the eggs by kicking them everywhere and making them stick to the coco hut which made them go bad.

Just this weekend though, I witnessed this same male go into a hut where my pair had laid eggs again and this time he had ate all the jelly and ate two of the three eggs laid and was about to eat the last one when I pulled the hut up and shooed him off. He was so round from eating all of that jelly and eggs and I was sooo upset. The last egg dried out and didn't work either.

So, now I am really going to separate the second pair in the tank into their own tank. :(

My husband and I just hated having such a large 75 gallon (our largest at least) show tank which is for everyone who comes to see to have only two frogs in it. But if we want them to breed I guess we have to do that. :(
 

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It all comes down to how badly you want successful breeding... and you obviously do. Just be glad that they are easy to handle :)
 

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I'm not sure if it is feasible, but perhaps you could install a glass barrier and divide the tank into two compartments. The glass would not have to go all the way to the bottom - just a couple of inches into the substrate.
Okay, I've read many threads about other females in a tank eating the others eggs, but I didn't think that a male would do that since I had never read about it.

I had in a previous post asked what possibly a second male was doing with eggs that had been laid and fertilized by another male. Some responded that they thought he might be trying to fertilize them himself.

Well, he only messed up the eggs by kicking them everywhere and making them stick to the coco hut which made them go bad.

Just this weekend though, I witnessed this same male go into a hut where my pair had laid eggs again and this time he had ate all the jelly and ate two of the three eggs laid and was about to eat the last one when I pulled the hut up and shooed him off. He was so round from eating all of that jelly and eggs and I was sooo upset. The last egg dried out and didn't work either.

So, now I am really going to separate the second pair in the tank into their own tank. :(

My husband and I just hated having such a large 75 gallon (our largest at least) show tank which is for everyone who comes to see to have only two frogs in it. But if we want them to breed I guess we have to do that. :(
 

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You could aways try trading for another male. I have a 2.1 group and the males get along fine. I've even seen them transporting tads from (what i assume to be) the same clutch.
 

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Unless you are determined to have Leucs in the 75-gal, you could set up a smaller viv for the pair and get a group of terribilis. They are large and showy and do well in groups.
 

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More people are suggesting keeping leucs in pairs for this reason. Same sex aggression can be pretty bad. Im not suprised that you caught another male eating eggs. Im working on a viv so I can split my 2:2 group. The male/male aggression has been pretty bad lately. I started with a 1:2 group, and had female aggression, and then kept an exceptionally patterned juvi (suspected male) and added ot to the group. Now hes 16 months old, and calling like mad and my dominant male won't take it.
I am currently suspecting my smaller male of egg eating as well
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I'm not sure if it is feasible, but perhaps you could install a glass barrier and divide the tank into two compartments. The glass would not have to go all the way to the bottom - just a couple of inches into the substrate.
I have actually tried that and LOL I think I have a video of them having a really hard time understanding why in the world they could not get to the other side of the tank. They would work every day trying to get to the other side. And they would put their little paws together on each side of the glass like if they were really close family and they were devastated about the separation. I think I have a video of it. I pulled it out after a few days. It was too sad to watch. But funny at the same time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
You could aways try trading for another male. I have a 2.1 group and the males get along fine. I've even seen them transporting tads from (what i assume to be) the same clutch.
There were 2.1 to begin with for about 3 years and the dominant male would always bully the other male. These are the same two males with now an extra female and the males do not fight anymore. But the male does eat the others eggs and the pair that lay the eggs now bully the female I first had.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Unless you are determined to have Leucs in the 75-gal, you could set up a smaller viv for the pair and get a group of terribilis. They are large and showy and do well in groups.
I thought about pairing them up and putting something else in the 75 gallon. But those yellow leucs are just so attractive to people. So are Auratus, but I don't know if I want them because I hear they are more shy. I guess I could consider that.
 
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