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Terribilis stays a special frog compared with other frogs.
For starters the terribilis was already mixed by Indians that took the frogs for hunting. So several populations where a mix of different colours due to humans.
Also due to the guerrilla wars and the drugs cartels in the region Terribilis is not a common import to other countries.
This is also the reason that we speak about a colour and not a place like for other frogs. In the wild I think there are several colour tones. But in the past they are mixed in the hobby. In my opinion there are only 2(3) colours and several tones. You can discuss about yellow and orange.
The blue colour mint is an existing tone but in the hobby people selected them to guarantee a blue offspring colour.
In the hobby this is also done for pumps and tincs.
Maybe 30% of bastimentos red frog beach is really from red frog beach. If it is not an import from frogs caught in the wild you never know if it is correct. Even the black foots are a colour selection by Tesoros. More colours = unique color=more money.
For tesoros this is ok for me there the money goes back to the frogs but this is also in the hobby. I also have the black one knowing this is a hybrid color. If you are honest about this I do not see a problem. It is not that the animals go back to the wild.
Do I get more money for the blacks? I do not know, until now I did not have offsprings. I only want a terribilis and if possible all the colour/tones in the hobby. If I sell offsprings I only use the names in the hobby. At the moment we only speak about mints and not about blue,yellow and white mint. So if we give new names a new frog is born even when it is the same as the terribilis mint from before and we add some $. Fore me it is about the hobby, the well-being of the frogs and enjoying whenever possible.
I’m not interested in the $. New colours or species that appear are often only for the $.

Is the blue a hybrid no.

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I believe they never gave the location info because they- tesoros- didnt want that info getting to smugglers. The black foots have only been in the hobby a few years whereas the original oranges have been in the hobby for many, many moons.

They are certainly different enough to keep separated.
That's true. Tesoros never specifically described the locality of these "blackfoot" Terribilis. However, in 2012, just a few years before Tesoros started exporting them, an article was published in Acta Herpetologica that describes (with photos and all) this newer locale. So I would say it's not that hard to figure out where in fact these originate.

I just got this yesterday.I got it for free for some reason. Is this black foot terribilis? https://i.imgur.com/Mi8LvMe.jpg
I would bet money it's not. Just don't sell offspring as such.

Not even the Blackfoot is a true morph. Only a colour selection.
It can be that different location have more with black feet than others but it is an orange or a yellow that accidentally has black feet. It can be that out of a Blackfoot pair you end op with normal orange and the other way around
This is completely false. They are not selectively breed. It is a true locality.

The "blackfoot" is a true morph. The only thing selectively breed about them is whether they are yellow or orange with black feet. The yellow blackfoot and orange blackfoot are the same morph and can be mixed. Tesoros does not line breed. The yellow blackfoot just came about when they were originally imported and some came out yellow, so they were called yellow blackfoot instead.
 

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@Tinc Tank Tessoros did not describe the location of the blackfoot because it is a color selection
Here a part of a tesoros article via national geographic

One strategy Lozano uses to discourage smuggling is to offer unique “morphs” of frogs with signature colorations produced exclusively through captive breeding. Because these color patterns aren’t found in nature, this provides further incentive to steer customers away from wild frogs. His most famous one is the “Tesoro Blackfoot”—a morph of the golden poison frog bred to have pitch-black feet that contrast with the otherwise brilliant yellow body.

Although the creation of new color morphs through captive breeding programs might, over time, create a narrowed gene pool, these frogs would never be intended for introduction to the wild—one might compare the practice to that of domestic dog breeding. But if they were to find their way into native habitats, it’s unlikely they would do any sort of harm to existing populations. One of the biggest challenges in reintroduction efforts is convincing wild and captive-bred animals to mate with one another.


The complete article


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That's true. Tesoros never specifically described the locality of these "blackfoot" Terribilis. However, in 2012, just a few years before Tesoros started exporting them, an article was published in Acta Herpetologica that describes (with photos and all) this newer locale.
Could you provide a link or at least a citation?

That National Geographic article has been heavily criticized here before, mostly in the choice to include an interview with a highly suspect source (search here for the various interviewees if you don't know who I'm talking about). The oversimplification of the link between captive breeding and demand for smuggled animals is also problematic. A look at the author's other writings indicate that she is concerned primarily with social and political aspects of Latin America, not so much precise details of biology. This article is not a credible source of information on frog breeding, I'm afraid.
 
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