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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i'm trying to find out what leaves can be used in a viv and what can't. i know of mag leaves oak leaves sea grapes, and almond. if you know of anymore leaves that can be used please add to the thread:D
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
okay, i'm trying to create a compost type substrate for my vivs and feeders so i just wanted to know if i went outside and racked my leave and baked them would it work:D
 

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Most deciduous tree leaves are fine. In fact, I usually put a layer of less durable leaves at the base of the leaf litter so that it will begin to break down quicker. I use the live oak and magnolia leaves for the surface, both because they are durable and look good.
okay, i'm trying to create a compost type substrate for my vivs and feeders so i just wanted to know if i went outside and racked my leave and baked them would it work:D
 

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Exactly what I do as well Jim.

I even take it a step further. I run local oak leaves (from the yard) through the blender (not to powder but to chop them up good). I then soak the chopped up leaves in water in a fruit fly container for an hour or so. Then I inoculate the container with some tropical springtails.

I leave them going for about a week - and this is the first layer I put down on the substrate (after planting). THEN I add the live oak leaves.

I figure it's the best chance to get the springs started in the tank - in the best environment for them.

s
Most deciduous tree leaves are fine. In fact, I usually put a layer of less durable leaves at the base of the leaf litter so that it will begin to break down quicker. I use the live oak and magnolia leaves for the surface, both because they are durable and look good.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
awesome scott gotta try that on the next one:D



Exactly what I do as well Jim.

I even take it a step further. I run local oak leaves (from the yard) through the blender (not to powder but to chop them up good). I then soak the chopped up leaves in water in a fruit fly container for an hour or so. Then I inoculate the container with some tropical springtails.

I leave them going for about a week - and this is the first layer I put down on the substrate (after planting). THEN I add the live oak leaves.

I figure it's the best chance to get the springs started in the tank - in the best environment for them.

s
 

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Any problem with using orchid leaves? I received a HUGE bag of them from an orchid grower. They're very thick and tough. But they are rather large (many of them are almost 12"). I boiled some for a few minutes and put them in my viv.

??
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
thanks guys for the info, i'll keep you posted on the compost substrate. i think i'm going to go as natural as possible and throw some veggies mix into it also so that when it all starts to break down it feed the plants and the microfauna. got a 5 gallon styrofoam cooler i'm going to start it in
 

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I use oak leaves in my vivs.

? Did you want leaves that decompose well? Maple leaves decompose really fast, and so do apple and pear. I use pear leaves as food for my shrimp because if you soak them in water they smell GREAT! and the shrimp like the pear-y taste.

I think I'm going to try hickory leaves (they're big and waxy) this fall, and some hickory nut shells (mmm those smell really really good)
 
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