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Currently, I'm feeding my phyllobates terribilis fruit flies and I ordered some red flour beetles. I'm wondering what's the largest prey that terribilis has been recorded to take down. Some ideas that I have are buffalo beetles and Kenyan roaches, which neither should grow past 1 cm.
This might be a stretch, but would they be able to banded crickets which get to about 2 cm full grown and red runners that get to 3 cm to terribilis? It might be useful to understand what is the largest prey Terribs have been recorded to gulp down.
 

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It might be interesting to know but I don't think you should be thinking of feeding your frogs from the perspective of the largest thing one of them has ever swallowed. Captive frogs with limited food variety are not faultless judges of what should be eaten and could certainly be injured by large arthropod prey. Crickets, for instance, have jaws and leg muscles powerful enough to injure a frog that "bit off more than it could chew."
 

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In terms of adults I have some very large Mints, intermediate sized Blackfoots and smaller Yellows. They're all aggressive hunters, to the point I've actually been bitten by one of my female Mints. Twice.

Which is to say they will attack most things that move, but that's not necessarily the safest thing for them. The largest items they're offered are quarter-inch crickets and isopods up to around that size.

I'm also careful of feeding them too much in the way of chitin-heavy prey; they get the larger items semi-regularly, plus the occasional waxworm treat every 2-3 months, but their staple items are a combination of melanogaster and hydei fruit flies.

My favourite thing about crickets and isopods is the ability to gut-load them with foods that will ultimately benefit the frogs, and IMO variety is good, but I steer clear of pushing their capabilities in terms of prey size.
 

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It might be interesting to know but I don't think you should be thinking of feeding your frogs from the perspective of the largest thing one of them has ever swallowed. Captive frogs with limited food variety are not faultless judges of what should be eaten and could certainly be injured by large arthropod prey. Crickets, for instance, have jaws and leg muscles powerful enough to injure a frog that "bit off more than it could chew."
I guess, I worded the question badly. What I meant to say is could I get a measurement of the largest prey a terribilis could safely prey on so I can better determine what foods I should supplement the fruit flies with. I am not thinking of full sized crickets, but rather the smaller banded cricket which has less chitin content
 

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In terms of adults I have some very large Mints, intermediate sized Blackfoots and smaller Yellows. They're all aggressive hunters, to the point I've actually been bitten by one of my female Mints. Twice.

Which is to say they will attack most things that move, but that's not necessarily the safest thing for them. The largest items they're offered are quarter-inch crickets and isopods up to around that size.

I'm also careful of feeding them too much in the way of chitin-heavy prey; they get the larger items semi-regularly, plus the occasional waxworm treat every 2-3 months, but their staple items are a combination of melanogaster and hydei fruit flies.

My favourite thing about crickets and isopods is the ability to gut-load them with foods that will ultimately benefit the frogs, and IMO variety is good, but I steer clear of pushing their capabilities in terms of prey size.
Have you had experience with banded crickets (Grylloides Signatus) or have you just been using the typical house cricket. I'm definitely not looking for the largest prey Terribs can take, but rather, a measurement of the largest size safest to them.
 

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Have you had experience with banded crickets (Grylloides Signatus) or have you just been using the typical house cricket. I'm definitely not looking for the largest prey Terribs can take, but rather, a measurement of the largest size safest to them.
Acheta domestica are what's readily available to me. I've heard some people complain that the banded crickets are harder to catch and prone to infesting homes, but that's all anecdotal. I'm not sure nutritionally they're going to be all that different. As for the largest size, it's relative to the individual frog but as noted, I generally avoid anything over a quarter-inch.
 

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Acheta domestica are what's readily available to me. I've heard some people complain that the banded crickets are harder to catch and prone to infesting homes, but that's all anecdotal. I'm not sure nutritionally they're going to be all that different. As for the largest size, it's relative to the individual frog but as noted, I generally avoid anything over a quarter-inch.
So I guess cherry reds and full grown crickets will be too big. How do you think Kenyan roaches will do? Adults only get to a quarter inch
 

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Have you ever dealt with roaches as feeders before? I'd strongly recommend not putting them in your viv before you fully understand how to deal with them. (I feed dubias and orange heads to other herps, and they can be miserable).
 

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So I guess cherry reds and full grown crickets will be too big. How do you think Kenyan roaches will do? Adults only get to a quarter inch
Definitely too big. They'd have trouble with adults although they'd try, possibly to their detriment.

No experience with Kenyan roaches, I used to feed Blaberus sp. to tree monitors many years ago, but based on that experience I'd stick to larger, aggressive and durable predators for roaches; not for frogs.
 

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Curl-winged house flies they like a lot. These flies can inly walk and keep running aroud which activates the terribilis. And bean beetles are good too. I am not a fan of crickets as they tend to escape into the leaf litter and grow big very quick. And are hard to catch. Makes me nervous.
Isopoda are ok, but they only eat them by accident, they are much more the cleaning crew.
 
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