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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How do you all keep your eggs and tadpoles at warm enough temps.

I live in pretty cool apartment, temperature wise and I never have been satisfied with my method of keeping eggs warm. The only way I have been able to do it so far is to float a plastic shoe box in a small aquarium with heater and pump to circulate the water. I put a glass lid on it to keep the humidity up. I mean, it works and I get healthy eggs and tads but its just a HUGE pain. Any other ideas? How do you keep your tads?

Raising the over all temp of my apt isn't really an option. I live with two other guys from Conn. and Mass. So 64 degrees at night is normal. Day time temps are around 68-69 degrees. In a couple months I imagine room temp will be about 72-73 if not higher.

Thanks,
-Richard
 

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I keep the temps in my home pretty cool as well. To keep my eggs at higher temps, I keep all my egg containers on a shelf very high off the ground, usually on the top shelf of my racks. Heat rises, of course, so the containers are at a slightly higher temperature when kept well above the floor level. I've used this method for quite some time, and it's never let me down. Hope this helps!
 

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You might try an incubator. I've seen Hova-Bators online for around $40, if you're going to IAD, they might have some there. The Hova-Bators are nice because you can fill them with water halfway to keep it humid. They're basically a styrofoam box with a heating element in the lid, and have clear windows on top so you can check on the eggs without opening it. YOU WANT THE THERMAL AIR FLOW VERSION! DO NOT GET THE TURBOFAN VERSION! The thermal flow version comes in two models: the one with two small windows, and one with a large picture window. You can buy the small window version from many herp vendors such as The Bean Farm, LLL Reptile, and Big Apple Herpetological. The picture window version is a bit more and somewhat harder to find, but you can buy it here:

http://www.randallburkey.com/fullsi...PTILE&location=results&process=add&item=1582R

There is also a Hova-Bator style incubator made by the Little Giant company, which is about the same but has a solid state thermostat. Still, I would not trust the thermostats on either of them. Get a good electronic hygro/thermometer and a lamp dimmer, or use one of the thermostats made by Zoo-Med or various other places. A decent thermostat will generally run about $25 - $30 and have a remote probe so you can keep the moisture sensative parts outside.

They both have removable liners to go in the bottom that would probably make cleaning a snap. Anyone ever used this method for frogs? I've incubated reptile eggs in them successfully before, but no amphibians.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks!
You know what’s funny? I have one of these already! It’s back at my parents’ house probably in the basement. I used to use if for leopard gecko eggs. Go figure.

Plus it gives me an excuse to call my mother. Thanks again.
-Richard
 

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I use a plastic Rubbermaid box with a heat pad attached to it where I keep my eggs. I use infra-red incandescent bulbs to heat the area where my tadpoles are. I too thought about sinking my tadpole containers into a larger aquarium that had heated water but it seemed like it would be hard to access them inside a container that was inside an aquarium. So far I haven't had a problem with the infra-red lights, two 75 watt bulbs roughly 12 inches above the tops of the containers keep the water temperature between 72F and 78F.

Devin
http://www.amphibiancare.com
 
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