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I have heard that these little guys (population wise) are not doing to well, in captivity or in the wild, I want to try and breed some, but I cannot find a good care sheet for the life of me :p I was wondering if any of you have any experience with them...?

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I've kept them before. I had 6 of them in a fully aquatic set up with an Island in the middle, That they rarely used. I usually Fed them black worms. Temps were mostly in the low 70's with an occasional drop of night time temp in the winter to 68. I was able to get them to breed.
Good luck with yours, they are beautiful
 

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I've had pretty mixed results with my neurergus species. Picked up three crocatus and two derjugini just before the ban, and split shipping with a friend who purchased five kaiseri.

They were all pretty small when they arrived, but within the first two weeks we lost one kaiseri and two crocatus. The kaiseri refused to eat (three of the five were initially problematic feeders), but the crocatus came out of nowhere. The first crocatus to go was the largest newt in the shipment, and was a ravenous eater. After losing that one, the second largest crocatus stopped eating, and died approximately a week later.

The remainin crocatus - which was the runt of the shipment - is still alive and well. Still a bit scrawny, but he feeds well. The remaining four kaiseri are feeding and doing well, last I checked. The derjugini have all been problem-free from the beginning.
 

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I've had pretty mixed results with my neurergus species. Picked up three crocatus and two derjugini just before the ban, and split shipping with a friend who purchased five kaiseri.

They were all pretty small when they arrived, but within the first two weeks we lost one kaiseri and two crocatus. The kaiseri refused to eat (three of the five were initially problematic feeders), but the crocatus came out of nowhere. The first crocatus to go was the largest newt in the shipment, and was a ravenous eater. After losing that one, the second largest crocatus stopped eating, and died approximately a week later.

The remainin crocatus - which was the runt of the shipment - is still alive and well. Still a bit scrawny, but he feeds well. The remaining four kaiseri are feeding and doing well, last I checked. The derjugini have all been problem-free from the beginning.
What are you feeding? How much water are they in? What type of water are you using? What is your water parameters? What is your filtration? What is your water change schedule? What size terrarium/tank/container are you using?

Given what you purchased I'm going to say you purchased from Jay and I have not had an issue and the reason I am asking all the questions.
 

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Water is kept in upper 60s, about 3" high at the time since they were terrestrial, distilled water, changed every other day, stocked with live plants. Fed live black worms, daphnia, and more recently (after the others died) frozen blood worms. No filtration.
 

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Don't use a screen top that just sits on the top of the tank (like the ones sold at petco) without a clasp mechanism--they can push it up enough to wiggle free:(
 

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I have heard that these little guys (population wise) are not doing to well, in captivity or in the wild, I want to try and breed some, but I cannot find a good care sheet for the life of me :p I was wondering if any of you have any experience with them...?

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Try the care sheet on Caudata.org. Also I'd go with oldlady's advice, make sure you have a tight-fitting lid, I once had a pair and they both crawled out from a 10-gallon tank filled with 3 inches of water when I left the lid open accidentally for an hour. Good luck with them, they're amazing critters:)
 

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Water is kept in upper 60s, about 3" high at the time since they were terrestrial, distilled water, changed every other day, stocked with live plants. Fed live black worms, daphnia, and more recently (after the others died) frozen blood worms. No filtration.
Don't use distilled water. I would use de-chlorinated tap or reverse osmosis with RO Right or Replenish added. Caudata Culture Articles - Bottled Water for Amphibians

I started mine much lower at 1" and have gradually built to 5" with the end goal of 8-9". Given the small size of the Kiaser newts (mine included) I did not place them in a tank as of yet and have opted for the 290oz circular tubs.

I feed thawed bloodworms and chopped earthworms and red wigglers. Caudata Culture Articles - Worms
 

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Don't use distilled water. I would use de-chlorinated tap or reverse osmosis with RO Right or Replenish added. Caudata Culture Articles - Bottled Water for Amphibians

I started mine much lower at 1" and have gradually built to 5" with the end goal of 8-9". Given the small size of the Kiaser newts (mine included) I did not place them in a tank as of yet and have opted for the 290oz circular tubs.

I feed thawed bloodworms and chopped earthworms and red wigglers. Caudata Culture Articles - Worms
Appreciate the advice. Mine are currently in 2.5g tanks. I'll change from the distilled water, but they seem to be doing well otherwise - all are feeding and putting on weight.

My friend's kaiseri died 2-3 days after arriving (pretty sure he wasn't using distilled), first crocatus went a few days later, and the second crocatus roughly a week after that. I also know an experienced newt/salamander keeper who lost two crocatus shortly after receiving...
 

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I have 5 crocatus for about a year now and I had no problems yet, they grow a bit slower than, say ribbed or crocodile newts. I use tap water, but I guess we have less chlorine over here. I have some rocks in the tank that rause KH and have a small filter unit in there, because the like a gentle current. They only go on land very seldom and only if the temp is raised. They love live gammarus and bloodworms, but eat frozen and even axolotl pellets as well. I hope to get them to breed this year.
 

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They are doing quite well in captivity and in the wild. More populations of N. kaiseri have been discovered in the wild. They do best in hard water. Distilled water is not good for them. In the wild kaiseri go to land part of the year. In captivity they can be kept either way. If you have problems in water switch them to land.

Overfeeding, soft water, and water quality are the biggest problems. When I had over 100 I was feeding them mostly salmon pellets. Unfortunately I sold most of mine before the shipping ban and am now looking for a male N. kaiseri in Penna.
 

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I too have kept and sold lots of Kaiseri. A very easy species in my experience that breeds like rabbits with almost no cycling, in my case at least. As Mike stated, they like hard water so stay away from distilled/RO. Just about any tap water will do unless it is extremely soft. I've had no problems maintaining them aquatic 100% of the time, but if there is some sign of disease, I generally like to switch to terrestrial setups and quarantine in plastic shoeboxes.
 
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