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Mantella baroni, Dendrobates auratus, Dendrobates azureus, Afrixalus dorsalis, Theloderma corticale
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I've never seen isopods attack a frog, however I have observed (and photographed) orange isopods catching and eating both pea aphids and firebrats.

I'll see if I can find the photograph of an isopod killing and eating a firebrat.
 

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Mantella baroni, Dendrobates auratus, Dendrobates azureus, Afrixalus dorsalis, Theloderma corticale
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Wow, that's very interesting. I'd like to see that.
Relocated the picture on my external hard drive:


Killed the firebrat by grabbing it and biting it's head until it stopped moving. The red you see comes out of the firebrat, I breed them on food that's loaded with carotenoids so they are massively gutloaded.
 

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Mantella baroni, Dendrobates auratus, Dendrobates azureus, Afrixalus dorsalis, Theloderma corticale
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Mantella baroni, Dendrobates auratus, Dendrobates azureus, Afrixalus dorsalis, Theloderma corticale
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If you think about it logically, the idea that isopods attack frogs is a bit silly because:
1. Frogs are slippery.
If you have ever tried to catch an escaped frog, you know how hard they are to get your hands on. Now imagine you're an isopod: 10,000X smaller, basically blind, no hands, and have the brain the size of a grain of sand.

2.Except thumbnail species, most frogs are bigger than isopods.
So that's basically like you trying to win a fight with an adult cow, using only your bare hands.

3. Frogs can jump and climb to places isopods can't/won't.
Like, I RARELY see isopods out where the frogs are. And if an isopod were to touch a frog in a way they didn't like, the frogs can easily just hop away (similar to when a fruit fly crawls on them and they don't like it).​
By this logic, crickets would also never succesfully attack frogs and they have been clearly demonstrated to do so. I see no reason why isopods couldn't use the same strategy (nibble at night when the frogs sleep). Regardless, I have also never seen isopods attack or go after a frog, even the ones that I've seen eating firebrats and aphids.
 

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Mantella baroni, Dendrobates auratus, Dendrobates azureus, Afrixalus dorsalis, Theloderma corticale
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This is an inaccurate comparison. Crickets have very strong serrated mandibles that can quickly break through even human skin. Crickets are much faster, and can climb where isopods will not. Also most crickets will grow larger than most isopods.
If you check out the photograph I posted before, this is at the top of the viv. ;) I've found this particular species of isopod throughout any viv I've thrown them in except on glass.

I agree that the mandibles of crickets are definitely stronger and more suited to tear into flesh of other animals, however don't underestimate the mandibles of isopods. They also have an edged or serrated tip which they use for chewing chunks of vegetables or leaves. I've got a link to a paper which has electron microscope photographs of isopod mandibles, but unfortunately I can't share this publicly because of copyright issues. However if you want I send them to you in a pm.

Even so, as I said before, I still believe isopods do not pose a risk to a healthy frog.
 
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