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Hello, I am building a dart vivarium out of an old aquarium. The glass has some residue on it that wouldn't come off with vinegar. Is it safe to use Windex? I can probably find some ammonia-free windex if I need to.

Also, still wondering if anyone has any suggestion on what a good size is for a breeding vivarium. Is 25-27 gallons too big for one pair of azureus?
 

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Windex kills fish when used on the outside of tanks, so I wouldn't use it.

As far as the size of the breeding tank, others can answer. I have a pair of tincs (I think...) in a 29 gallon and they are together constantly. Still no eggs though.
 

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Well, wait a minute. I would think you could use windex on the empty tank to clean it before setting it up. You would have to rinse it afterwords with a bleach solution, then water.

However, the residue is probably lime deposits, so I'm not sure Windex would remove it. Good aquarium shops sell a fish safe lime deposit remover, I belive it's called Python Glass Cleaner, that would probably be the safer choice.

Tim
 

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Between a vinegar solution (right out of the bottle) and a flat razor blade I've not had any problems taking off deposits other than a couple things that may permenently bond to the glass (so I was told, but I haven't had trouble getting stuff off old fish tanks with the above method). After a good soak with vinegar the deposists usually come right off with the razor blade.
 

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kyle1745 said:
I would be very careful on using ANY chemicals in a tank. It does not take much at all.
So no water then? Sorry, couldnt' resist.

Most people agree that vinegar and water is safe to use but be aware that heavy mineral deposits can actually etch glass so there are times when no amount of cleaning will restore the clarity of the glass. It would have to be polished at that point... or just cut out the bad panel and replace it.
 

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Shouldn't posts like this be in the beginners discussion area? Seems like several topics are coming on advanced discussion that would be better classified under beginners.
 

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Ok ok good point...

I guess be careful with what you use. If you are cleaning a tank before use a 10% bleech solution is a ok idea as long as it is rinsed out afterwords. I'm sure windex would be ok if rinsed afterwords on a tank before it was built, but I would not risk it. I would not use either though in a tank with frogs in it. I would not use anything other than water.

bbrock said:
kyle1745 said:
I would be very careful on using ANY chemicals in a tank. It does not take much at all.
So no water then? Sorry, couldnt' resist.

Most people agree that vinegar and water is safe to use but be aware that heavy mineral deposits can actually etch glass so there are times when no amount of cleaning will restore the clarity of the glass. It would have to be polished at that point... or just cut out the bad panel and replace it.
 

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how can windex kill fish when used on the outside of the tank??? :?

pastorjosh said:
Windex kills fish when used on the outside of tanks, so I wouldn't use it.

As far as the size of the breeding tank, others can answer. I have a pair of tincs (I think...) in a 29 gallon and they are together constantly. Still no eggs though.
 
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Glass is highly permeable to certain substances. The windex simply diffuses through the pores in the glass, into the tank, and kills the fish.
 

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Marty said:
news to me, I used windex for years and never lost a fish. This smells a bit fishy to me :?
If you have an ammonia test kit like most big fish hobbiest do, take a water sample test the ammonia level. Then clean the glass with windex or simular product, test about every two hours for ammoina you should see a nice spike. If you have been doing this to your fish you might want to stop.

*This is also a good experiment for a science fair if anyone is interested.

Doug
 

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I don't have any fish these days, just darts. I use amonia free plexi glass cleaner now..

dpotter1 said:
Marty said:
news to me, I used windex for years and never lost a fish. This smells a bit fishy to me :?
If you have an ammonia test kit like most big fish hobbiest do, take a water sample test the ammonia level. Then clean the glass with windex or simular product, test about every two hours for ammoina you should see a nice spike. If you have been doing this to your fish you might want to stop.

*This is also a good experiment for a science fair if anyone is interested.

Doug
 

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pastorjosh said:
Windex kills fish when used on the outside of tanks, so I wouldn't use it.
Windex will not kill fish when used on the outside of the tank, as long as you don't spray the Windex into the tank.

Originally posted by Lydia -
"Glass is highly permeable to certain substances. The windex simply diffuses through the pores in the glass, into the tank, and kills the fish."

And I'm sorry but glass is not permeable, period.

While it may not be a good idea to use Windex inside a tank prior to making a Vivarium, misinformation needs to be addressed.

Tim
 

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I've got to agree with Tim and Marty here. Doug, if you're seeing a spike it might be because you have ammonia in aerosol form floating its way into an uncovered aquarium (or even through small holes in the top), not permeating glass. If glass was really selectively permeable, we would never be able to use flasks twice in chemistry labs (yes, I know it's now Pyrex, but it used to be glass before Pyrex).

This is definitely the stuff urban legends are made of.
 

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I know there is some permeability to glass, but nothing near the levels you're claiming. A quick wipe with windex will not harm fish in the tank... NO WAY ! If glass was permeable to amonia, you wouldn't need to remove it from water. it would just naturally seap out of the tank, you'd just need a little trough to collect it, hhehe :D

I do know that glass can dissolve in water if left submersed for centuries. Divers that pulled out glass artifacts from ship wrecks
noted that there were no more sharp edges and glass was much more thin, etc... that could be attributed to some other stuff present in water... I'm no expert ....but I digress :wink:





Homer said:
I've got to agree with Tim and Marty here. Doug, if you're seeing a spike it might be because you have ammonia in aerosol form floating its way into an uncovered aquarium (or even through small holes in the top), not permeating glass. If glass was really selectively permeable, we would never be able to use flasks twice in chemistry labs (yes, I know it's now Pyrex, but it used to be glass before Pyrex).

This is definitely the stuff urban legends are made of.
 
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