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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I’m writing this post because I’m very concerned my new froglet may have somehow escaped?? Or is possibly just hiding very well. One of my tadpoles just recently turned into a frog, he still had his tail and his body is no bigger than the size of my pinky nail.
I went ahead and transferred him to a new terrestrial enclosure in a 12x12x20 front opening tank. It has reptisoil, moss covering nearly the entire bottom, rocks, bark, branches, the whole deal. I had him in this enclosure for about two days before noticing this morning that I could not find him anywhere!!

he’s quite difficult to spot, but I usually locate him after about 5 minutes of looking. This time, nothing! I’ve felt around the moss looking for where he could possibly be burrowed, searched nearly everywhere without actually moving any of the fixtures, and have not been able to locate him. I’m very worried because his tail was nearly gone and he’ll be needing to feed soon. I’m not sure if there is any possible way he could have escaped, but no gaps/openings seem remotely big enough for him to fit through.
Does anyone have any suggestions?? Should I just wait it out and hope he turns up or should I keep searching for him?
 

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I've gone through vivs with a fine toothed comb in anticipation of tearing them down, and during the teardown itself I've still found thumbnail frogs hiding. If a frog wants to hide, a human isn't going to find it.

Based on your other thread, it has been one day since you've put it in the viv. Best to give it some space and not poke around lest it get real serious about hiding from the giant predator. It isn't clear what finding it or not finding it would accomplish anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I've gone through vivs with a fine toothed comb in anticipation of tearing them down, and during the teardown itself I've still found thumbnail frogs hiding. If a frog wants to hide, a human isn't going to find it.

Based on your other thread, it has been one day since you've put it in the viv. Best to give it some space and not poke around lest it get real serious about hiding from the giant predator. It isn't clear what finding it or not finding it would accomplish anyway.
Thanks for the reply! i had put the froglet in the viv a day before my post I made yesterday. I’ve never kept such a small frog before and I’ve never had such a complex setup, so I had grown concerned about whether or not the frog was still even in there. He still hasn’t turned up, but I’ll leave it be and make sure food is available for it. Hopefully he turns up! :)

is there any particular reason he might want to hide/burrow? Maybe problems in temperature, humidity, light, etc. or is it just something they’ll do whenever they want to?
 

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is there any particular reason he might want to hide/burrow?
From your description it doesn't really sound like a suitable tank for a new froglet. A really simple setup with moss and a handful of large leaves is much better. You can find frogs if you occasionally have to do a head count. Also the frogs can't go into deep hiding where fruit flies rarely go. The froglets have to learn to actively hunt. That means having fruit flies walk right in front of them for a little while until they gain the skills and confidences to chase the flies down.

Once everyone is eating a good layer of leaf litter can be added.
 

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I don't know anything about the species you're keeping (pacific treefrog, right?), but I have darts I don't see for months.

Specific reasons your frog might hide is that it is in a very vulnerable stage right now. Make sure that all prey items offered are dusted with Repashy Calcium Plus if it is possible to dust them (i.e. all FFs, crickets, etc).
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
From your description it doesn't really sound like a suitable tank for a new froglet. A really simple setup with moss and a handful of large leaves is much better. You can find frogs if you occasionally have to do a head count. Also the frogs can't go into deep hiding where fruit flies rarely go. The froglets have to learn to actively hunt. That means having fruit flies walk right in front of them for a little while until they gain the skills and confidences to chase the flies down.

Once everyone is eating a good layer of leaf litter can be added.
Thats good to know. How will I know when the frogs are ready for the full sized vivarium? I have several more tadpoles along the way that will be transforming soon, I wanna make sure I can give them all the best care possible! But I’ll only be keeping a few and releasing the rest. If the frog in question does turn up, should I transfer him to a home that is more suitable?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I don't know anything about the species you're keeping (pacific treefrog, right?), but I have darts I don't see for months.

Specific reasons your frog might hide is that it is in a very vulnerable stage right now. Make sure that all prey items offered are dusted with Repashy Calcium Plus if it is possible to dust them (i.e. all FFs, crickets, etc).
Ah I see, I just wanna make sure I can monitor him and know he’s doing alright since he is so young. I’ve been keeping fruit flies in his enclosure, although I have not yet bought any supplements (I’m waiting until I get paid again). I’ll likely transfer him into a smaller enclosure if he turns up again so that I can watch him more closely until he’s ready for the larger enclosure.
 

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No where in this tread did the original poster mention that we were talking treefrogs and not dart frogs. My comment was for dart frogs. Tree frogs would get a simple setup of bare moss and a pathos plant to hide amongst.
That’s my mistake, the frog on question is a pacific tree frog. Is the setup y out are describing for a froglet or a full adult frog? I know tree frogs love having plenty of places to climb.
 

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Thats good to know. How will I know when the frogs are ready for the full sized vivarium? I have several more tadpoles along the way that will be transforming soon, I wanna make sure I can give them all the best care possible! But I’ll only be keeping a few and releasing the rest. If the frog in question does turn up, should I transfer him to a home that is more suitable?
It would be irresponsible to release these frogs back into the wild and pose a major risk of pathogen/disease transfer to wild populations.

Ah I see, I just wanna make sure I can monitor him and know he’s doing alright since he is so young. I’ve been keeping fruit flies in his enclosure, although I have not yet bought any supplements (I’m waiting until I get paid again). I’ll likely transfer him into a smaller enclosure if he turns up again so that I can watch him more closely until he’s ready for the larger enclosure.
Supplements are not a "nice to have", they are an absolute necessity. Without them, the frog will die or become deformed through the early growth stages.
 

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It would be irresponsible to release these frogs back into the wild and pose a major risk of pathogen/disease transfer to wild populations.
Do we have the full story here? If one collects tadpoles, as I assume this person did, and raises them to the froglet or subadult stage and releases them in the spot they were collected where does this "major risk of pathogen/disease" come from? Those are some strong words to throw around.
 

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Do we have the full story here? If one collects tadpoles, as I assume this person did, and raises them to the froglet or subadult stage and releases them in the spot they were collected where does this "major risk of pathogen/disease" come from? Those are some strong words to throw around.
Strong, yup - because they are true.

What are you feeding these? Crickets? Fruit Flies? Were they exposed to captive bred animals? Probably. Do they have other amphibians? Have they all been tested for disease/parasites?

Entire populations of amphibians have been wiped off this earth due to diseases, and some of these have been tracked back to exposure to the pet trade. I for one enjoy the native populations we have where I live and think protecting them is of utmost importance - even if it means having to cull animals instead of releasing them.
 
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