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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was wondering if in the earlier years if anybody saw things like Dendropsophus sarayacuensis or glass frogs from Peru or Ecuador.

Would be interesting to hear your experiences working with them or even just your stories.
 

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Glass frogs came in during the 1980's and maybe early 1990's but rarely and few in number. I never saw them, well not from dealers, but one lady brought some to Frog Day one year to show me. Said she's breed them and would offer me offspring the next time they breed. Never heard from her again. But similar things have happened many time over the years.

I think it was right place, right time sort of thing.

Best,

Chuck
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I know the care of these guys, particularly as tads is very demanding, but I wonder why we don't see any that have made it. People had to have bred them back then.
 

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I know the care of these guys, particularly as tads is very demanding, but I wonder why we don't see any that have made it. People had to have bred them back then.
You're kinda applying a "dart frog rationale" here. Many darts are so easy too breed that many, many generations have created "lines" etc. to be perpetuated in captivity. These aren't dart frogs. Seems to me that people take for granted the fact that frogs DON'T breed like guppies, at least that's my opinion. There is just so much trial and error throughout the whole process, I mean, you're dealing with an animal that has multiple life stages, in different habitats, before they even become adult. There is just so much that can wrong.

Frogs are pretty damn delicate in my opinion, and I'm not surprised at all that no lingering glass frog populations lurk in some basement somewhere.

I also "heard" about Mantella cowanii being bred, and "easily". Furthermore, I "heard" about Atelopus "spumarius" being bred. This was 12 years ago, where are they? Just take into consideration one power outage, disease outbreak, human error etc. and the odds pile up pretty quickly that any cool little long lost colonies of rare frogs may just be a daydream.

I am really happy that Understory is working with them though.:) JVK
 

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You're kinda applying a "dart frog rationale" here. Many darts are so easy too breed that many, many generations have created "lines" etc.
This isn't exactly correct. Most of the lines represent a different import or aquisition of the frogs not that they got so numerous that different lines were created by the breeders.

Frogs are pretty damn delicate in my opinion, and I'm not surprised at all that no lingering glass frog populations lurk in some basement somewhere.
Many frogs particularly captive bred animals are no where near as delicate as is put forth by many people. In reality many of the supposedly delicate animals do well with benign neglect and are only percieved as delicate because people spend too much time disrupting them and thier enclosures to fiddle with it.


I also "heard" about Mantella cowanii being bred, and "easily". Furthermore, I "heard" about Atelopus "spumarius" being bred. This was 12 years ago, where are they? Just take into consideration one power outage, disease outbreak, human error etc. and the odds pile up pretty quickly that any cool little long lost colonies of rare frogs may just be a daydream.
Where are the thousands of "hardy" auratus that have not only been imported but produced by breeders? We can actively demonstrate that this frog has been bred in captivity in the US for going on 30 years now yet the populations don't show it even though this is a species that can have a life span into the two decade mark.
 

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How the heck do I divide up a paragraph and quote multiple times? Just tried a couple times.

You catch my drift on the "lines" though, I'm sure (I did add the "etc." as a disclaimer :) ).

Good point about the "benign neglect" thing. It's really all about setup, setup, setup. However I have had frogs live for years and years on "benign neglect" and crash suddenly when I lagged a bit on some aspect of husbandry.

Auratus are victims of the fashion trends of a Darters world it seems. Sad, because they are one of the coolest looking darts in my opinion.JVK
 

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How the heck do I divide up a paragraph and quote multiple times? Just tried a couple times.

You catch my drift on the "lines" though, I'm sure (I did add the "etc." as a disclaimer :) ).

Good point about the "benign neglect" thing. It's really all about setup, setup, setup. However I have had frogs live for years and years on "benign neglect" and crash suddenly when I lagged a bit on some aspect of husbandry.

Auratus are victims of the fashion trends of a Darters world it seems. Sad, because they are one of the coolest looking darts in my opinion.JVK
Use either the tag from the start of the quote to start new paragraphs and use the [/quote] from the end of the automatic quote to end the seperated lines. Cut and paste are your friend.
 

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I remember seeing D. sarayacuensis come in once when I was in middle school (mid 90's). I remember because I thought they were weird-looking clowns but the owner of the store was calling them Selvas. Does anyone know why they aren't imported anymore?
 

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Honestly not 100% sure (this was 15 years ago) but the pics I have seen of sarayacuensis seem to be the closest match to what I remember. The coloration was similar to N. pictus but with a body shaped like an elongated clown. I remember for sure that she was calling them Selvas, thats the biggest clue to me that they were sarayacuensis. I also believe they are mentioned as being imported in one of the treefrog books from the mid-90's, I can see if I can find it if you would like.
 

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They are mentioned in The Guide to Owning American Treefrogs by Jerry G. Walls. I believe its out of print but I got it used on Amazon for like $2. There is a lil info on sarayacuensis, but they call D. ebraccatus the "selva treefrog" which is what I have heard people call sarayacuensis....common name confusion as usual. They really are awesome frogs, maybe they will come back in sometime soon.
 
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