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Discussion Starter #85
Awesome photos! We've had a bumper crop of mushrooms here in Wisconsin this year too, in spite of a mostly dry summer.

Roughly where in Belgium were these photos taken? It looks to be near the coast, maybe?
 
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No, I live more inland near Antwerp. These are taken in a small forest nearby in a town called 'Begijnendijk'. But Belgium is a very small country, so for US citizens it's probably considered very close to the coast :D


Never seen so many mushrooms pop like this year!
 

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Discussion Starter #87
The photos reminded me of the Pacific Northwest, along the Pacific coast, much of which is considered a temperate rainforest. Here in the upper middle US where I am, there are only little pockets of the dense, moist habitat like in your photos -- most of the forest here is more open, and drier.
 

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The photos reminded me of the Pacific Northwest, along the Pacific coast, much of which is considered a temperate rainforest. Here in the upper middle US where I am, there are only little pockets of the dense, moist habitat like in your photos -- most of the forest here is more open, and drier.
Here it's actualy the same. This is only a very small moist area and is home to more different species of amfibians than other places 'nearby'..
 

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This is a great thread and just the kind of stuff I was searching for a few weeks ago - too bad I didn't find this thread then ;)

I notice even in the "wetter" areas typically you don't see anything like the green, moss covered vision a lot of folks have. It just isn't how most of the rainforest is. I have seen mossy grottos in temperate forests - and imagine they exist in tropical forests too - usually a place where there is a slow steady stream of water and all the mosses and tiny water loving plants grow en masse - but that really doesn't seem to be how most of a forest floor is, and it's good to be aware of this when envisioning the natural environment of the frogs!
 

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Greetings,
This is a video of a Exo Terra expedition to the Bocas Del Toro archipelago to search for different dart frog locals. If you go to 8:45 in the video you will see a section of Macgravia growing out of the tree. Possibly white seam macgravia or even sintenisii. It just amazes me on how many plants we use here in the hobby are actually from certain areas in Central America.
Also, Socratic monologue, you linked a thread on plants in montane regions of Costa Rica. Here it is: https://www.dendroboard.com/forum/g...situ-vivarium-design-inspirations-nature.html

Gastrotheca
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Crested Gecko 0.2.0
 

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In the embedded thread above, the fourth picture on that thread shows a fallen log with plants growing on it. I believe that the farthest left large plant is a Philodendron "wend imbe", but I may be wrong. Again just showing the amount of plants used here that are common in the "In situ" habitat of our dart frogs.
 

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I have the book of Emmanuel and Rick's exoterra expedition laying around here somewhere.. If I find it, I will scan the photo's and post them here.

If you like marcgravia and other insitu plants/frog photo's, you realy need to follow 'showjet95' aka Paul Fowler on Instagram! By far my favorite Instagram page!
 

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He has a great page for sure! Many of his photos have Philodendron verrocosum growing in the background. Many photos of Biophytum and Marcgravia too, amazing.
 

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Discussion Starter #97
I thought this video was linked here, but I couldn't find it.

Video from The Guardian on Phyllobates terribilis (in situ footage starts around 6:30):

 

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There is only one known enemy of P. terribilis: Liophis epinephelus. This is a small snake that feeds on young frogs. The snake is immune to the toxins produced by these poison frogs, but because it is so small, it can only feed on young frogs. (Daly, et al., 1980; Myers, et al., 1978; Stewart, 2010)

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Liophis epinephelus

 
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