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There was a call for donations for the production of this documentary a few years ago, and I know some DB members contributed. Thanks for the link!

"Jewels of the Neotropics, a production of Poison Dart Frogs, The Documentary Project, is a conservation testimony that gives voice to a peculiar family of amphibians of Central and South America: poison frogs (Dendrobatidae). Through reflexive images and inspiring interviews with people who are actively fighting against their threats (Otonga Foundation, Jambatu Center, Wikiri, Cali Zoo and the Costa Rican Amphibian Research Center), this film wants to rise consciousness about how human activity (illegal mining and subsequent water pollution, deforestation, livestock, illegal trade...) is really damaging these unique species. By showing initiatives that are already having a positive impact, this story constitutes a reason for hope for a better future."
 
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Not in situ, but interesting nonetheless.

"Brian Kubicki of the Costa Rican Amphibian Research Center (C.R.A.R.C.) gives a tour of the captive frog breeding lab near Guayacán de Siquirres on the Caribbean foothills of Talamanca in the Limon Province of Costa Rica."
 

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I just wanted to say that I had the opportunity to go on a herp field study in Peru for a month during college. We saw a lot of Allobates femoralis. They utilized fallen trees/branches within a few feet of the ground to call. One team member studied males reactions to a tape recording of a male calling. The males would usually chirp angrily and climb all over the speaker trying to find the intruder!
 

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I just wanted to say that I had the opportunity to go on a herp field study in Peru for a month during college. We saw a lot of Allobates femoralis. They utilized fallen trees/branches within a few feet of the ground to call. One team member studied males reactions to a tape recording of a male calling. The males would usually chirp angrily and climb all over the speaker trying to find the intruder!
If you have any pictures to share, we would really enjoy seeing them! :)
 
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