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The thing I would do is fill in the empty space with pieces of wood, on angles to allow frogs to climb up. The empty space doesn't produce any floorspace for the frogs to use.

Examples from my tanks:
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Second what fishingguy said about more wood but what I would recommend is to put a big bromeliad in the front center. They will use it a bunch and its nice to be able to see them all the time. They will spend most of their time in the broms so if they only have those ones in the back you will rarely see them. You can also drill a hole in the top of a cocohut and put a brom in there. Here's my varadero setup
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Second what fishingguy said about more wood but what I would recommend is to put a big bromeliad in the front center. They will use it a bunch and its nice to be able to see them all the time. They will spend most of their time in the broms so if they only have those ones in the back you will rarely see them. You can also drill a hole in the top of a cocohut and put a brom in there. Here's my varadero setup View attachment 299107
View attachment 299108
Thanks! I love what you did with your tank. Really nice. Are you breeding yours? It looks like you have three in there?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The thing I would do is fill in the empty space with pieces of wood, on angles to allow frogs to climb up. The empty space doesn't produce any floorspace for the frogs to use.

Examples from my tanks:
View attachment 299103 View attachment 299104 View attachment 299105
Thanks. Good point. How would you go about adding pieces of wood at this stage? I guess I could silicone a piece to the glass, or use gorilla glue to put something in above the broms? I'm a little hesitant because I don't want to harm the plants or the isopods and springtails I put in there already. Or more an idea for my next one maybe?!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I agree with @fishingguy12345. I also am not sure how well that orchid will do in the viv. It looks like a Phal. to me and I just know those can get big and usually do best as epiphytes or in an airy soil mix.
Thanks. Yes, that occurred to me too. I'm ok pulling it if doesn't do well. It's resting on a bit of driftwood in there and the soil is ABG, so I'm hoping it does ok in there, at least for a while.
 

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Thanks. Good point. How would you go about adding pieces of wood at this stage? I guess I could silicone a piece to the glass, or use gorilla glue to put something in above the broms? I'm a little hesitant because I don't want to harm the plants or the isopods and springtails I put in there already. Or more an idea for my next one maybe?!
If you using thin wood you don't have to silicone it on. You can lean them against the sides and they'll stay in place. I like using manzanita pieces for these types of things.
 

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Thanks. Yes, that occurred to me too. I'm ok pulling it if doesn't do well. It's resting on a bit of driftwood in there and the soil is ABG, so I'm hoping it does ok in there, at least for a while.
The Phalaenopsis will likely do better pulled out of the substrate and mounted to wood, with or without sphagnum based on how much you’re misting. If you just move it a few inches up on that wood next to it, that should do the trick. As far as size, since it’s already blooming size, it probably won’t get much wider, but a happy phal will keep stacking leaves vertically.
 

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You absolutely need to take the phal out of the ground and mount it on something, preferably dangling to one side so any water in the crown (the point where all the leaves meet) will drain out. Phals are epiphytes, not terrestrial plants.

I agree that you should put more climbing opportunities in there. Right now you have an enclosure that would be good for toads and other non-climbing animals, you need more vertical space. Maybe some cork branches? Those are nice and lightweight. Just get the branches, embed one end in the substrate, and lean the other end against a wall or something else solid. It'll stay.

I would get a small-leafed, suitable vine to grow on your background, just to fill out some of that background space. Oak leaf ficus, marcgravia, or solanum could all look nice. Or there are a few creeping begonias. Maybe Pellionia pulchra?
 
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