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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hello all, I am new here but I have some concerns about one of my frogs, and I would be incredibly grateful for any advice.

First of all, here's some background information. I'll try to be as detailed as possible- I have three captive bred clown tree frogs (Dendropsophus leucophyllatus), and these are my first frogs. I am unsure but I believe two are male and one is female. The two males are about an inch long and in seemingly very good health. The female is about 1.5 inches, and she is the one I am worried about.

Back in January of this year, I got the first of my three frogs (one if the males), then at the beginning of April I got the other two. I got them from a local shop that I trust pretty well.

They seem to get along very well, and adjusted very nicely. However, about a week ago I noticed my female seemed to be pretty inactive. She usually spent most of the day in some hanging leaves, and I would see her come down to the bath most every night. But lately she has been spending all day on the bath's edge or on the floor, and she doesn't seem to move around much if I don't disturb her first. I can also see her hip bones much more than when I first got her, and I am worried she's not eating well. I don't think she's pooped since about a week after I got her, but it can be hard to tell with two other frogs. Over all, her skin looks healthy and her eyes are clear, however there is a small pale spot on her nose that is not part of her patterns. She also looks like she's shedding normally.

I feed them medium size gut loaded crickets daily and dust them with a vitamin/calcium dust about three times a week.

I am considering contacting an exotic vet but I was wondering if there is anything I should do/try before doing so. I've done as much research as I can, but I am new to this and at somewhat of a loss. I am also considering changing her diet to see if that will help encourage her to eat. Any tips, information, or advice is greatly appreciated.

Edit- I am going to start searching for vets asap, and I am going to set up a separate enclosure for her.

As for the original enclosure, I'll describe the set up and provide photos- the tank is 18x18x24 inches, and about 30 gallons. It is glass with a front opening. I use eco earth loose coconut substrate and sphagnum moss over it. The temperature in the enclosure is 75 F in the day and about 70 F in the night. I try to keep the enclosure at about 70-80% humidity, but my fogger set up isn't the best at the moment, so it can get to about 50% if I don't mist the enclosure every 2-3 hours.

I have two lamps, one for lighting and one heat lamp. I don't know the exact type or wattage, but the light is the kind that is supposed to help your frogs with vitamin d.
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These are some photos of the enclosure. The top photo also shows what my frog looked like at the beginning of April (larger frog towards the right).

Here are some photos of what she looks like now. The last one shows the strange spot on her nose. Sorry they are not the best, I can try to get better ones later if needed.
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Lastly, as I am going to set up a separate enclosure for her, I was wondering if anyone had any suggestions or recommendations? I am thinking of getting a smaller 10 gallon tank or a plastic shoe box. I also am considering getting a small tarantula enclosure; the type that open at the top.
 

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Sorry to hear your frog isn't doing well -

I would recommend contacting a veterinarian as soon as is possible - COVID19 has really increased the demand for vet visits, and it can take weeks to get in for an appointment, and hours of wait time on ER. If you're going to pursue treatment you should start calling around to see who can see frogs and what their availability is.

I would post your photos of the sick frog and the enclosure - that may help forum members advise any husbandry changes (I'll let other members comment with specific recommendations, I am not that familiar with this species specifically). Parameters (temperature, humidity if you have it) may help as well. As a reasonable starting point, you could set up a separate enclosure for your sick frog and move her out. If she's still eating and this is stress/competition from the cagemates, that is a potential fix.
 

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Save as much stool as you can as they share contact and water. Put in fridge with a little distilled water if scraped from a leaf, or use a turkey baster if in the water. A cloacal wash may be in order on the thinner frog.
 

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She has a little rostral abrasion and does look thin. The other ones look great.

You might want to figure out why/where she got that.

Silver sulfadiazine is often used for minor rostral rubs.

Quarantine has important merit if attention is paid to the Q env. Otherwise it defeats its purpose. The most common oversight in Q container is when they are hurriedly put together, with punched holes and unclear strategy. Temperature control and ventilation is key.

I would seperate her until you see the doc.
 

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The abrasion looks like its been there awhile. With repeat contact offense.
 

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That looks like a pen plax, about 12 inches? Frequently used and better than punching holes in a tupperware.

Ordinary room temps are not what i Q small tropical frogs in. There are ways to finesse it with a uth + dimmer and i have warmed inverts in them with proxy to a computer modem but of course im not recommending it outright.

I like 5 gallon tanks with screen lids. It allows for more stability and a uniformly performing recommend of uth sizes and use.

But again i would only seperate her now if her temperature could be reliably controlled.
 

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Hard plastic plants and even the silk ones can have bad contact spots.

They also repel moisture.

Pothos is an easy go to. With cork bark everywhere even flat pieces flush to the floor. You need to hold on to your misting event
 

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Sorry im at work Hold On meaning retain some moisture on surface areas however delicately over the hrs
 

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You have a distal relationship with your heating and lighting that is not ideal and quite possibly problematic.

The thermometer guage is only telling you what temp it is exactly There where it is attached.

Get a temp gun, and dimmers for your non fluorescent lamps.

If the uvb lamp isnt a zoomed 5.0 it may be useless. They come in 2 configurations a compact and a tube.

The compacts can be ok when used properly. They come in 13 w and 26 w.

I have started hatchling turtles under compact zoo meds so they can work. Im red on my battery presently 15%
 

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Okeydoky. Plugged in.

Per the uvb lamps - the only way to use them to attain any kind of useful halo of coverage is to position them laterally. Unfortunately being incandescently adapted they are usually just screwed into a dome lamp. There are little hoods made by zoo med that will position them the right way.

If you are using a tube, the operating electrical warmth and retainment of the fixture unit - the hood - as well as the tube itself which does emit warmth into the upper aspect; even though its not a "heat lamp" can be exploited for this feature by insulating the back and sides of the glass tank with hobby board card board, or interior background builds.

In some circumstances with mildly warm needs taxa it is enough for the diurnal hours.

Insulating also allows you to finesse lower wattage 'heat lamps' or pads applied on or close to un insulated glass walls. Mitigating moisture blast out.
 

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Sitting in the bowl could mean the frog is dehydrated. It could also mean that something is stopping up her bowels and she's trying to stool soften. But if it's an impaction, only a vet can help you with that. The enclosure does look like it could swing to dry rather easily, so up the misting perhaps. Everything should dry out at some point in the day- but don't keep it constantly drenched. And the nose injury is possibly from the artificial plants, as KMC noted. I would replace them with pothos or philodendron as he also suggested. You could even have them in pots for ease of removal for cleaning and don't have to plant them in the substrate.
Put a sprig of one of these plants in her hospital tank. Make sure the water dish is cleaned daily in the QT as well. Upping temps and increasing moisture can help amphibians get over lots of issues, but don't bet on it over a vet with your first frog(s). Live plants are the best way to insure healthy humidity in my experience. That environment will also breed bacteria faster, so cleanliness is essential. If she'll eat, try some softer, smaller fare. Can you get Phoenix worms or termites? both of them have some frat that's good in a thin frog and they should stimulate an aggressive feeding response.
Good Luck, and keep us posted.
 
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#1 advice from Ravage as always.

I dont like to have loose stuff on the floor that can be eaten with a cricket. And they arent able to disperse very many places else in the env. I suspect theres some drying spikes and night drops going on. Not sure but one thing you could do since theres a fair amount of room is get a 5 inch crock a few inches tall to drop the crickets in. Some pop out but there are ways to encourage them to stay better.

Your species frogs dont have any relationship with loose substrate in their native lifestyle. The only thing its good for is holding some moisture but that can be achieved with pothos, cork that holds some moisture after misting and provides clear surfaces and a larger water container. Putting the water container on a flat overturned crock in an easy to maneuver place makes it more compatible with frequent changes. A little white bucket kept under the table, etc. to tip it 'on site' will smooth water replacements for you.
 

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One other little thing that may also inspire ppl here with more than a utility connection with plants to share their knowledge with plant choices..

I had alot of pothos where we had clowns and reeds. Both species were bask- centric and i stuck bamboo in the pots and also fixed them horizontally so everyone got a good spot. The ones thst were most popular with the frogs were the few that were split down the center, ' halved' . They tucked themselves in the concavity. I believe it was because it replicated furls of some plant species. And they were firm and could put them right were needed.

I hope all this was not overwhelming but gave you some ideas for your guys.

Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thank you to everyone who has given me advice, I am taking it all into consideration! For now I have a small update- I have set up a separate enclosure for her including a tank heating pad. The temperature is about 70 degrees at the moment, but I have just now insulated the outside two of the walls with paper towels and cardboard so hopefully it'll get a little warmer. I currently don't have a separate hydrometer for this enclosure, but from what I can tell it seems like a good humidity. The enclosure is a 12x8x8 animal transportation case that I've seen used for quarantining sick frogs/reptiles.

I am looking into getting live plants as suggested, and I hope to replace my plastic ones soon. If she doesn't eat any crickets tonight I'm going to look for phoenix worms.

Thank you everyone for your help, I really appreciate it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Hello again, I have one small update for today for anyone curious- my frog seems to be doing better in her quarantine enclosure and she ate two small crickets last night! I am continuing to monitor her closely, and will keep her quarantined until I can get her into a vet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Hello once again, I have some very good news! My frog has been eating about two crickets each night, and last night she ate two crickets and a phoenix worm! I saw she pooped last night, so she likely doesn't have impacted bowls! Additionally I got rid of all of my plastic plants and replaced them with pothos. My frogs seem to love them :) Thanks again for all of your advice, everyone. You have all been extremely helpful.
 
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