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Uh a brown one.... :lol:

Seriously, if you've had this rock in other aquariums the rock, if it had anything to leech out, has cured and shouldn't be a problem. Good luck. I'm setting up another tank and I could see that rock being a perfect waterfall.
Mike
 

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We used to get this rock in shipments for our tropical fish store, it came from a company called Fellerstone. The trade name of the rock is pagoda stone. I've used it in many fish tanks, even with soft acidic water and it does not alter pH or hardness. I would expect it to be inert and safe with amphibians based on past experience but I'd be cautious as collecting sites may have changed. You may want to contact some local aquarium stores to get more specific info.

Thanks
ERic
 

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Devin,

It looks like a sandstone. Drop a couple drops of vinegar on it and listen. If you hear bubbles (or see them with a 10x glass) then the cement is calcium carbonate and it'd probably be best not to use it. If there is no reaction then the cement is probably quartz and no problem.

Best,

Chuck
 

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You know, calcium carbonate based rocks are what is most commonly used in reef tanks as the "live rock." I wouldn't see how a calcium carbonate based rock could be dangerous. Maybe keep it in a tub of water, and check the ph levels, and any other tests that may be helpful. I don't see how it could be bad though,

Ed Parker
 

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First, the calcium carbonate will leach out of the rock and where's it going to go? Where does it go when you use hard water in your tanks? On the glass. If you want to keep looking at the frogs you don't want to use calcium carbonate based rocks. Second a marine set up is completely different than a frog set up. Many, most, marine invertebrates incorporate large amounts of calcium carbonate into their skeletons, so they need a higher percentage of it. That's not true of our frogs. Third, and this a bit of a stretch. The toxins produced by many of the frogs effect the calcium channels in the body. If you have several wild caught frogs that have poisoned each other you sprinkle a little bit of calcium powder on their back to help with the problem. I imagine living in an environment with an excess of calcium would not be good for them.

Best,

Chuck

Mantellaprince20 said:
You know, calcium carbonate based rocks are what is most commonly used in reef tanks as the "live rock." I wouldn't see how a calcium carbonate based rock could be dangerous. Maybe keep it in a tub of water, and check the ph levels, and any other tests that may be helpful. I don't see how it could be bad though,

Ed Parker
 
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