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Do you use RO water?

  • Oh YEAH!

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  • Nah! Tap water for me.

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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello fellow Dendroboarders,
I am getting tired of paying for water for my frogs, and tadpoles. It is time I got an RO system. Can anyone out there give me their opinion on a good one?
Thanks in advance.
Dave
 
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These are an awesome deal and if you have a misting reservior you can couple it with a float valve and it will keep the reservior constantly full. No need to ever fill it again. This Seachem is the one I have and the parts are the same quality as the Kent units for less $$$. You really don't need 100 gal/day, but with the float valve it works great. I only use 5 gal/week but I got a good deal on it.
http://www.drsfostersmith.com/product/p ... 004+113075
 

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If you don't need that much water, consider taking a trip to the local hardware+home store. What I did when I got mine, is I went to all the usual suspects(home depot, menards, kmart etc.) and seen which model was the most common, which is the omnifilter 2000. The reasoning behind that is simple: It really sucks when you need to replace a filter, and you cant remember where you bought the unit, so you have to either run all over town, trying to find one, or order one and wait, and pay for shipping. Worse yet if you get a rarer model, and it is discontinued, good luck finding a replacement filter!
I think the RO 2000 is supposed to be good for about 13 gallons a day, and works great, and comes with its own tap.
 
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Yes Brian, you are right. 100 gpd is the max the unit would put out if allowed to run all day. The float valve only allows the unit to make what is needed. I got a deal because I had a 20% coupon through email and they had the unit on sale.

Raplacing the filters on this unit is easy and you should date the new labels anyway when you install them. BTW, I had this unit from a reef tank we had and it still works perfect.
 
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With my small collection of frogs I use about 7 gallons a week and buy it from a local water conditioning place for $.50 a gallon so the $3.50 isn't bad at all.My usage will go up this winter when I have to use it for my orchids instead of rainwater but no big deal.
Mark W.
 
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Only reason I like it so much, is it makes the misting system fully automatic. Misters are on timers and the reservoir keeps itself full with the float valve. I never have to bother with it at all. :D
 

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I got mine from here. I have the 50GPD RO/DI unit and have used it constantly for years. I get about a year out of the membranes, and I make at least 15-20 gallons per week, every week. I highly recommend them, they are great people and answer all of your questions when you call. I have had my unit for a little over 2 years now and never had a problem with it.
 

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I was fortunate enough to be able to trade some azureus froglets for my RO unit at Frog Day this year. You could contact Ron Harlan at Back to Nature Filtration, he was very nice to deal with. I also acquired a TDS meter and PH probe, as well as the needed buffers. Send me a note if you would like his contact info.

John
 

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Jared J said:
Only reason I like it so much, is it makes the misting system fully automatic. Misters are on timers and the reservoir keeps itself full with the float valve. I never have to bother with it at all. :D
Very convenient indeed...the only thing with that type of set-up is if you don't have a drain plumbed in, you must pay extra attention to setting you're timer. Imagine accidentally setting the timer to come on at 9:00am and accidentally setting it to turn off at 9:01pm instead of am :shock:
 

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I'm using the 100gpd RO/DI unit from Aquatic Reef Systems. I've owned and operated it for overa year now. Works great. Also, be sure to get a TDS meter and the membrane-flush kit.
 

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I've been visiting some aquarium forums to read up on water lately. I'm not sure that RO water is good for our needs. The RO process completely strips the water of all minerals, etc. Once the water is RO processed, it must then be reconstituted.

I would think that Tap water treated for Chlorine and/or Chloramine and then pH adjusted would be the better option. Better yet, filter it through some peat bark to lower the pH.

JMHO,
Tim
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
A great point Tim.

A great point Tim,
But I prefer to do the process backwards. I start with water and add additives to it. Some people prefer oak tea, but I use the Black Water additives by Tetra. It has the tannins and minerals that I think growing tads need. The well water around here is inhospitable for our tads and eggs, so I switched to gallon jugs of spring water. Well we are using our spring water like....like....like....well like wtaer. So we are strongly considering an RO system. Thanks for the recommendations everyone.
Dave
 

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Jared J said:
These are an awesome deal and if you have a misting reservior you can couple it with a float valve and it will keep the reservior constantly full. No need to ever fill it again. This Seachem is the one I have and the parts are the same quality as the Kent units for less $$$. You really don't need 100 gal/day, but with the float valve it works great. I only use 5 gal/week but I got a good deal on it.
http://www.drsfostersmith.com/product/p ... 004+113075
Jared, the way you set this up is good, but everyone that is considering doing something similar should read THIS. I've been a reefer, reef aquarist for 5+ years and know these problems all too well. You are using a mechanical device, it will fail, maybe not today, not tomorrow or even this year but it will fail. There are several ways for it to fail.
1, it gets stuck on, RO keeps going and whamo you have a flood. Not too big of a deal, but trust me; no fun.
2, electicity leak. Huge problem. Most float switches designed for use in an aquarium, or other use enough ohms in their switch device to electrocute or seriously shock a grounded person. If this is to happen, well if you ever touch your water, are touching a nozzle when the mister comes on, etc. you get a not so nice surprise.
Ways around these two problems are relatively simple, but very important.
1. Use two float switches. 1 to fill the tank, 1 to shut your RO system off if it is floated, as a safety shut off switch. $40 is no big deal compared to a minor/major flood.
2. Use a high quality float switch. Once designed to fail and still not shock you at all. Look here: http://aquadevices.50megs.com/order1.htm
I've used their switches for years and never had one fail in any way.
Hope this helps or saves anyone considering running a float switch on a sump or misting container...
 

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ED's_Fly_Meat_Inc said:
Hello fellow Dendroboarders,
I am getting tired of paying for water for my frogs, and tadpoles. It is time I got an RO system. Can anyone out there give me their opinion on a good one?
Thanks in advance.
Dave
Most of these ro systems are very similar if not identical. The membrane and the number of stages/micron sizes of the filters are what is important.
the things to consider are really how much water you intend to make. 25GPD is probably enough. And if you need a tank for the system. Making buckets works for me, but if you prefer to just fill it from a switch that can be easier for you. I would shop around on ebay and see what you can find there. I purchased one there years ago and have been very pleased with it.

I wouldn't really mess around with flush kits, membrane treatments etc. I've researched it fairly extensively and all the effort you can put into cleaning/repairing a dirty/used membrane serves little to no purpose. membranes aren't that expensive compared to their longevity. Replacing them is the way to go once that time arises.
 

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whoops, forgot to reply to this one. Considering I'm a big time carnivorous plant and orchid hobbyist, RO water is a must. I used Nature Way's RO system's 150 BP three stage unit I believe. Its been so long, I barely use mine. I have had it for 4 years, and haven't changed the filter. Only when it gets clogged and stops making water is when you need to change it, according to the people that sold it to me. They used to advertise in Carnivorous Plant Newsletter, Nature's Way. However, the carbon goes bad faster, so you may want to add additional chlorine remover after a while. I really should though think about getting a new filter, to prepare for that day when it won't work anymore. During the summer, I hook it up to the hose and let it run for a few hours in an irrigated way in my bog garden.
Their website doesn't seem to exist anymore, I hope this number still works. 800-780-2320, 941-923-2763
 

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I get my water out of my many fish tanks. THen the chlorine is broken down, and the water acts as a fertilizer for the plants, and the frogs seem to love it. I guess if you don't have fish tanks, you are out of luck :?
 

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Even though I have an RO unit, I only use it for misting purposes, because of aesthetics. The glass doesn't get as dirty from minerals. I can see why some people may consider RO water, as the mineral deposits get harder after a while in the terrarium, which may not be good for the plants. However, I still water my tanks with tap water. Ever now and then, I add RO water just to keep myself from having to change water, which I have never done.
 
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