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A little editing:

Hyloxalus azureiventris
AKA: Cryptophyllobates azureiventris (Kneller and Henle, 1985), Phyllobates azureiventris

  • Difficulty:
    Beginner.

  • Location & History:
    The species is found in Peru, around Tarapoto. It's a lowland species, found up to 3600 ft (1100 meters) above sea level. Listed as Endangered because its Extent of Occurrence is less than 1930 square miles (5,000 km2), all individuals are in fewer than five locations, and there is continuing decline in the extent and quality of its habitat. Hyloxalus azureiventris was exported legally and sustainably in mid-2005 as part of the INIBICO project.

  • Descriptions & Behavior:
    The species are named after their blue belly, with a black irregular pattern. Back legs are green to blue. On the side and back there is a lining as seen in more Poison Dart Frogs. This line is variable of color, can change color, is green, yellow, orange or red. A second line goes from groin to halfway the side of the animal. This line is mostly lighter then the upper line. Some animals have a yellow spot in the upperarms, and/or a spotted pattern on the back. Females become slightly bigger then the males. In general, the species becomes 1" - 1.2" (25 to 30 mm).

    The species is well known for it's loud and long call: males can call for a 40 seconds. In a couple, males do not call as often anymore. They are typically found under exposed roots, rock outcrops and leaf litter during the day where they are good ambush feeders, but seek higher broad leafed areas at night.

  • General Care:
    Tank temperatures should be kept on 70-75 degrees Fahrenheit, (21-24 degrees Celsius). Humidity should be around 90%, although higher humidity can induce breeding. The species seems to enjoy a waterfeature (for example a waterfall) in the tank, but will do well in almost every enclosure. Minimum size for a couple is 25 gallon, and even larger for more animals. H. azureiventris are bold jumpers. They seem to relish both smaller prey items and larger - like Hydei and bean beetles equally

    The species can be kept in groups, or couples. Breeding succes of the latter is notable higher than when in a group. Especially because males wresle on regular basis, and females are known to eat eachother's eggs.

  • Breeding & tadpole Care:
    Females will deposit clutches of 10-20 eggs in film canisters and on sheltered leaves. Males attract females by calling and guide them to a potential terrestrial breeding site, usually a dead leaf sheltered from view by some kind of cover (other leaves, bark, coconut shell in captivity). The male initiates egg laying by some wiping movements of the feet. During laying, the female takes a crouching position with the head close to the ground and all of the posterior ventral surfaces of the body on the ground. From time to time she turns slightly in a circle-like way, her mid-body always remaining at the same site. Eggs accumulate under her abdomen during a time of about 1-2 hours. Meanwhile the male sits next to her, sometimes touching her back with one hand or sitting less closely about 1" (2 - 3 cm) away. Very often the male has left when the female is still laying 12-18 eggs altogether. He returns after the female has left and remains with the eggs for almost the entire period to hatching, which occurs after about 14 days. Since the eggs are white, and the jelly is clouded, the eggs may seem bad at first sight. After a few days, development becomes visible. He always carries all larvae capable of wriggling onto his back. In captivity larvae remain on the male's back up to 7 days before they are released in a body of water.

    Tadpoles can be raised communally. Development time from hatchling to frog is six weeks. After that, they reach adulthood very fast: in three months, calling can be heard from males. Females need at least six months to reach maturity. Tadpoles can be fed a mix of fishfood, Spinach and Nettle fiber (stinging nettle, Urtica) plant.

  • Pictures:


    cryptokat


    Thinair


    Elf_Ascetic


    Elf_Ascetic


    Elf_Ascetic


    elmoisfive


    elmoisfive

References:
(1) Dendrobates.org - Hyloxalus azureiventris
(2) Hyloxalus azureiventris
(3) Lötters et al., 2000
 

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Hyloxalus azureiventris
AKA: Cryptophyllobates azureiventris (Kneller and Henle, 1985), Phyllobates azureiventris

  • Difficulty:
    Beginner.

  • Location & History:
    The species is found in Peru, around Tarapoto. It's a lowland species, found up to 3600 ft (1100 meters) above sea level. Listed as Endangered because its Extent of Occurrence is less than 1930 square miles (5,000 km2), all individuals are in fewer than five locations, and there is continuing decline in the extent and quality of its habitat. Hyloxalus azureiventris was exported legally and sustainably in mid-2005 as part of the INIBICO project.

  • Descriptions & Behavior:
    The species are named after their blue belly, with a black irregular pattern. Back legs are green to blue. On the side and back there is a lining as seen in more Poison Dart Frogs. This line is variable of color, can change color, is green, yellow, orange or red. A second line goes from groin to halfway the side of the animal. This line is mostly lighter then the upper line. Some animals have a yellow spot in the upperarms, and/or a spotted pattern on the back. Females become slightly bigger then the males. In general, the species becomes 1" - 1.2" (25 to 30 mm).

    The species is well known for it's loud and long call: males can call for a 40 seconds. In a couple, males do not call as often anymore. They are typically found under exposed roots, rock outcrops and leaf litter during the day where they are good ambush feeders, but seek higher broad leafed areas at night.

  • General Care:
    Tank temperatures should be kept on 70-75 degrees Fahrenheit, (21-24 degrees Celsius). Humidity should be around 90%, although higher humidity can induce breeding. The species seems to enjoy a waterfeature (for example a waterfall) in the tank, but will do well in almost every enclosure. Minimum size for a couple is 25 gallon, and even larger for more animals. H. azureiventris are bold jumpers. They seem to relish both smaller prey items and larger - like Hydei and bean beetles equally

    The species can be kept in groups, or couples. Breeding succes of the latter is notable higher than when in a group. Especially because males wresle on regular basis, and females are known to eat eachother's eggs.

  • Breeding & tadpole Care:
    Females will deposit clutches of 10-20 eggs in film canisters and on sheltered leaves. Males attract females by calling and guide them to a potential terrestrial breeding site, usually a dead leaf sheltered from view by some kind of cover (other leaves, bark, coconut shell in captivity). The male initiates egg laying by some wiping movements of the feet. During laying, the female takes a crouching position with the head close to the ground and all of the posterior ventral surfaces of the body on the ground. From time to time she turns slightly in a circle-like way, her mid-body always remaining at the same site. Eggs accumulate under her abdomen during a time of about 1-2 hours. Meanwhile the male sits next to her, sometimes touching her back with one hand or sitting less closely about 1" (2 - 3 cm) away. Very often the male has left when the female is still laying 12-18 eggs altogether. He returns after the female has left and remains with the eggs for almost the entire period to hatching, which occurs after about 14 days. Since the eggs are white, and the jelly is clouded, the eggs may seem bad at first sight. After a few days, development becomes visible. He always carries all larvae capable of wriggling onto his back. In captivity larvae remain on the male's back up to 7 days before they are released in a body of water.

    Tadpoles can be raised communally. Development time from hatchling to frog is six weeks. After that, they reach adulthood very fast: in three months, calling can be heard from males. Females need at least six months to reach maturity. Tadpoles can be fed a mix of fishfood, Spinach and Nettle fiber (stinging nettle, Urtica) plant.

  • Pictures:


    cryptokat


    Thinair


    Elf_Ascetic


    Elf_Ascetic


    Elf_Ascetic


    elmoisfive


    elmoisfive

References:
(1) Dendrobates.org - Hyloxalus azureiventris
(2) Hyloxalus azureiventris
(3) http://www.dendrobates.org/articles/Lotters_etal_2000_Cryptophyllobates.pdf
(4) Hyloxalus azureiventris > Gifkikkerportaal > Soorten
 

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I'd like to provide some editing - but without being able to choose different fonts, etc. It's nearly impossible to provide any good input that actually "shows" what the revisions are

So I will email a word document with my suggested revisions to Elf Ascetic and Jason.
 

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On second thought that won't work either (can't attach). So here goes.

First some I have some questions as to the general validity of some of the statements. Here are some comments for each of the items:

>>40 second long calls?

I have 7 different males and have never heard a call that long. Is there a general consensus on this or is this your personal observation?

>>When housed as a pair, males do not call as often.

Again, this has not been my experience. Is there a general consensus on this or is this your personal observation?

>>The species seems to enjoy a waterfeature (for example a waterfall) in the tank.

This is often included in species accounts and in every instance that I can think of, it is the keepers personal preference and does not hold up across the board.

>>Minimum size for a couple is 25 gallon.

Again not my personal experience, I have pairs that do quite well in smaller enclosures. However, I do believe that larger enclosures are always a better idea.

>>Breeding success of the latter is notably higher than when in a group. Especially because males wrestle on regular basis.

Group vs pair results are highly variable from keeper to keeper. I myself tend to agree with the above statement, however several of our fellow froggers strongly disagree. Furthermore, male on male aggression (wrestling etc..) often stimulates breeding activity in groups rather than discouraging it.

>>From time to time she turns slightly in a circle-like way, her mid-body always remaining at the same site.

There is great variability in mating behavior. I don’t believe that blanket statements such as this can be substantiated.

>>Meanwhile the male sits next to her, sometimes touching her back with one hand or sitting less closely about 1" (2 - 3 cm) away.

See the bullet above.

>>Development time from hatchling to frog is six weeks.

This should be a range (ie x weeks to x weeks). Personally, I’ve never had any morph in less than 9 weeks – usually closer to 11 weeks.

>>Females need at least six months to reach maturity.

This should be stated as a generalization. How can we tell when females are sexually mature? Are we sure it takes six months? The onset of sexual behavior does not always correlate to sexual maturity.


Some general editing suggestions later...
 

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^ Very good points. All of the data that I collected was not from personal experience, but from some research. There are links to the data in the "references" section.

I like the "ranges" ideas, because as you say not every set-up/frog/care taker is the same. I will do some editing and let me know what you think. Keep in mind, I have no more authority than you to edit, I was just glad to see Elf_Ascetic take the initiative and thought I would help out with a little more info and layout.

We need more personal experiences/idea like this keep it up!!!! :)
 

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Registered
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Edit, with new info. :) Keep it coming!

Hyloxalus azureiventris
AKA: Cryptophyllobates azureiventris (Kneller and Henle, 1985), Phyllobates azureiventris

  • Difficulty:
    Beginner.

  • Location & History:
    The species is found in Peru, around Tarapoto. It's a lowland species, found up to 3600 ft (1100 meters) above sea level. Listed as Endangered because its Extent of Occurrence is less than 1930 square miles (5,000 km2), all individuals are in fewer than five locations, and there is continuing decline in the extent and quality of its habitat. Hyloxalus azureiventris was exported legally and sustainably in mid-2005 as part of the INIBICO project.

  • Descriptions & Behavior:
    The species are named after their blue belly, with a black irregular pattern. Back legs are green to blue. On the side and back there is a lining as seen in more Poison Dart Frogs. This line is variable of color, can change color, is green, yellow, orange or red. A second line goes from groin to halfway the side of the animal. This line is mostly lighter then the upper line. Some animals have a yellow spot in the upperarms, and/or a spotted pattern on the back. Females become slightly bigger then the males. In general, the species becomes 1" - 1.2" (25 to 30 mm).

    The species is well known for it's loud and long call. Some times when housed as a pair, males may not call as often. They are typically found under exposed roots, rock outcrops and leaf litter during the day where they are good ambush feeders, but seek higher broad leafed areas at night.

  • General Care:
    Tank temperatures should be kept on 70-75 degrees Fahrenheit, (21-24 degrees Celsius). Humidity should be around 90%, although higher humidity can induce breeding. The species seems to enjoy a waterfeature (for example a waterfall) in the tank, but will do well in almost every enclosure. Minimum size for a couple is 20 gallon, and even larger for more animals. H. azureiventris are bold jumpers. They seem to relish both smaller prey items and larger - like Hydei and bean beetles equally

    The species can be kept in groups, or couples. Group vs pair results are highly variable from keeper to keeper. When kept as a group, male on male aggression (wrestling etc..) may often stimulate breeding activity. Some breeders prefer to house only pairs because they believe breeding success is notable higher than when in a group. Especially because males wresle on regular basis, and females are known to eat eachother's eggs.

  • Breeding & tadpole Care:
    Females will deposit clutches of 10-20 eggs in film canisters and on sheltered leaves. Males attract females by calling and guide them to a potential terrestrial breeding site, usually a dead leaf sheltered from view by some kind of cover (other leaves, bark, coconut shell in captivity).

    There is great variability in mating behavior. The following was described by Lötters et al., 2000. The male initiates egg laying by some wiping movements of the feet. During laying, the female takes a crouching position with the head close to the ground and all of the posterior ventral surfaces of the body on the ground. From time to time she turns slightly in a circle-like way, her mid-body always remaining at the same site. Eggs accumulate under her abdomen during a time of about 1-2 hours. Meanwhile the male sits next to her, sometimes touching her back with one hand or sitting less closely about 1" (2 - 3 cm) away. Very often the male has left when the female is still laying 12-18 eggs altogether. He returns after the female has left and remains with the eggs for almost the entire period to hatching, which occurs after about 14 days. Since the eggs are white, and the jelly is clouded, the eggs may seem bad at first sight. After a few days, development becomes visible. He always carries all larvae capable of wriggling onto his back. In captivity larvae remain on the male's back up to 7 days before they are released in a body of water.

    Tadpoles can be raised communally. Development time from hatchling to frog is 6 to 14 weeks. After that, they reach adulthood very fast: in three months, calling can be heard from males. Tadpoles can be fed a mix of fishfood, Spinach and Nettle fiber (stinging nettle, Urtica) plant.

  • Pictures:


    cryptokat


    Thinair


    Elf_Ascetic


    Elf_Ascetic


    Elf_Ascetic


    elmoisfive


    elmoisfive

References:
(1) Dendrobates.org - Hyloxalus azureiventris
(2) Hyloxalus azureiventris
(3) http://www.dendrobates.org/articles/Lotters_etal_2000_Cryptophyllobates.pdf
(4) Hyloxalus azureiventris > Gifkikkerportaal > Soorten
 

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Registered
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On second thought that won't work either (can't attach). So here goes.

First some I have some questions as to the general validity of some of the statements. Here are some comments for each of the items:

>>40 second long calls?

I have 7 different males and have never heard a call that long. Is there a general consensus on this or is this your personal observation?
I still have to encounter one that doesn't. Maybe it has something to do with the bloodline? (I heard 3 different bloodlines, of which the direct import INIBECO frogs are my own). This info can be found on Dendrobates.org - Home as well..

>>When housed as a pair, males do not call as often.

Again, this has not been my experience. Is there a general consensus on this or is this your personal observation?
General consensus from the breeders I spoke to, as well as my personal observation. How big where your groups before splitting them in couples? Mine 3.0 and 2.1 did call a lot. 1.1 only when eggs where on the wat.

>>The species seems to enjoy a waterfeature (for example a waterfall) in the tank.

This is often included in species accounts and in every instance that I can think of, it is the keepers personal preference and does not hold up across the board.
Does not exclude the fact that this species can be found in the water regulary. More then all my other frogs. Maybe put it differently "Thoughts are that the species seems to enjoy a waterfeature (for example a waterfall) in the tank. Most H azureiventris breeders do so, but this is not obligatory."

>>Minimum size for a couple is 25 gallon.

Again not my personal experience, I have pairs that do quite well in smaller enclosures. However, I do believe that larger enclosures are always a better idea.
I think it is not a bad idea to state a little more then nesserary. If you say "20 gallon", some people will put them in 15.

>>Breeding success of the latter is notably higher than when in a group. Especially because males wrestle on regular basis.

Group vs pair results are highly variable from keeper to keeper. I myself tend to agree with the above statement, however several of our fellow froggers strongly disagree. Furthermore, male on male aggression (wrestling etc..) often stimulates breeding activity in groups rather than discouraging it.
Yeah, I was surprised when I heard from American breeders that they do fine in groups. The guys who have them in the Netherlands can't get consistent offspring off groups. I wonder what the difference is. Bloodline? Temp? humidity? Way of housing?

>>From time to time she turns slightly in a circle-like way, her mid-body always remaining at the same site.

There is great variability in mating behavior. I don’t believe that blanket statements such as this can be substantiated.
Agreed.

>>Meanwhile the male sits next to her, sometimes touching her back with one hand or sitting less closely about 1" (2 - 3 cm) away.

See the bullet above.

>>Development time from hatchling to frog is six weeks.

This should be a range (ie x weeks to x weeks). Personally, I’ve never had any morph in less than 9 weeks – usually closer to 11 weeks.
Hm, ok, 6 to 11 weeks it is..

>>Females need at least six months to reach maturity.

This should be stated as a generalization. How can we tell when females are sexually mature? Are we sure it takes six months? The onset of sexual behavior does not always correlate to sexual maturity.
Is this better?
"There are no observations of females under six months laying eggs."


Thank you for your help.
 

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Joined
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Edit, with new info. :) Keep it coming!

Hyloxalus azureiventris
AKA: Cryptophyllobates azureiventris (Kneller and Henle, 1985), Phyllobates azureiventris

  • Difficulty:
    Beginner.

  • Location & History:
    The species is found in Peru, around Tarapoto. It's a lowland species, found up to 3600 ft (1100 meters) above sea level. Listed as Endangered because its Extent of Occurrence is less than 1930 square miles (5,000 km2), all individuals are in fewer than five locations, and there is continuing decline in the extent and quality of its habitat. Hyloxalus azureiventris was exported legally and sustainably in mid-2005 as part of the INIBICO project.

  • Descriptions & Behavior:
    The species are named after their blue belly, with a black irregular pattern. Back legs are green to blue. On the side and back there is a lining as seen in more Poison Dart Frogs. This line is variable of color, can change color, is green, yellow, orange or red. A second line goes from groin to halfway the side of the animal. This line is mostly lighter then the upper line. Some animals have a yellow spot in the upperarms, and/or a spotted pattern on the back. Females become slightly bigger then the males. In general, the species becomes 1" - 1.2" (25 to 30 mm).

    The species is well known for it's loud and long call. Some times when housed as a pair, males may not call as often. They are typically found under exposed roots, rock outcrops and leaf litter during the day where they are good ambush feeders, but seek higher broad leafed areas at night.

  • General Care:
    Tank temperatures should be kept on 70-75 degrees Fahrenheit, (21-24 degrees Celsius). Humidity should be around 90%, although higher humidity can induce breeding. The species seems to enjoy a waterfeature (for example a waterfall) in the tank, but will do well in almost every enclosure. Minimum size for a couple is 20 gallon, and even larger for more animals. H. azureiventris are bold jumpers. They seem to relish both smaller prey items and larger - like Hydei and bean beetles equally

    The species can be kept in groups, or couples. Group vs pair results are highly variable from keeper to keeper. When kept as a group, male on male aggression (wrestling etc..) may often stimulate breeding activity. Some breeders prefer to house only pairs because they believe breeding success is notable higher than when in a group. Especially because males wresle on regular basis, and females are known to eat eachother's eggs.

  • Breeding & tadpole Care:
    Females will deposit clutches of 10-20 eggs in film canisters and on sheltered leaves. Males attract females by calling and guide them to a potential terrestrial breeding site, usually a dead leaf sheltered from view by some kind of cover (other leaves, bark, coconut shell in captivity).

    There is great variability in mating behavior. The following was described by Lötters et al., 2000. The male initiates egg laying by some wiping movements of the feet. During laying, the female takes a crouching position with the head close to the ground and all of the posterior ventral surfaces of the body on the ground. From time to time she turns slightly in a circle-like way, her mid-body always remaining at the same site. Eggs accumulate under her abdomen during a time of about 1-2 hours. Meanwhile the male sits next to her, sometimes touching her back with one hand or sitting less closely about 1" (2 - 3 cm) away. Very often the male has left when the female is still laying 12-18 eggs altogether. He returns after the female has left and remains with the eggs for almost the entire period to hatching, which occurs after about 14 days. Since the eggs are white, and the jelly is clouded, the eggs may seem bad at first sight. After a few days, development becomes visible. He always carries all larvae capable of wriggling onto his back. In captivity larvae remain on the male's back up to 7 days before they are released in a body of water.

    Tadpoles can be raised communally. Development time from hatchling to frog is 6 to 14 weeks. After that, they reach adulthood very fast: in three months, calling can be heard from males. Tadpoles can be fed a mix of fishfood, Spinach and Nettle fiber (stinging nettle, Urtica) plant.

  • Pictures:

    cryptokat


    Thinair


    Elf_Ascetic


    Elf_Ascetic


    Elf_Ascetic


    elmoisfive


    elmoisfive


References:
(1) Dendrobates.org - Hyloxalus azureiventris
(2) Hyloxalus azureiventris
(3) http://www.dendrobates.org/articles/Lotters_etal_2000_Cryptophyllobates.pdf
(4) Hyloxalus azureiventris > Gifkikkerportaal > Soorten
 
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