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1.0 D. Leucomelas - 8 E. Anthonyi - 2 D. Tinctorius 'Tumucumaque'
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all,

I have a vivarium that has a ventilation strip on the front, but way too low. This has been causing leaking issues for way too long and I want to fix it. It's siliconed on on the right and left side, which can easily be removed to get rid of the strip. What would I use to block the hole? Plexiglas with silicone won't bond well right?
300029

Thank you
 

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Hello all,

I have a vivarium that has a ventilation strip on the front, but way too low. This has been causing leaking issues for way too long and I want to fix it. It's siliconed on on the right and left side, which can easily be removed to get rid of the strip. What would I use to block the hole? Plexiglas with silicone won't bond well right?
View attachment 300029
Thank you
I would just remove the whole front, cut a new piece of glass, adjust the tracks and sliding doors and call it done. You would have to breakdown the viv to accomplish this. I have done repairs like this with heavily grown over backgrounds successfully. Cover the background with moist paper towel and then plastic wrap. Keep it moist and work fast. If you can complete it in 24-48 hours and don't let the back dry out, you should be fine.
OR:
2) If cosmetics is not an issue, I'd just cover the vent (neatly) with glass-fiber and epoxy. If you prep everything so it's clean (super clean) and dry it should seal the entire unit. It will take multiple layers to become water tight.
Or 3) Replace the vent itself with a glass strip cut to exactly the same size by a glass shop. That will bond to the glass with silicone perfectly. Do not use plexi- you are correct- it won't bond.
For all of these techniques it is imperative that all old silicone is removed and the surfaces cleaned with acetone or denatured alcohol before rebonding. Nothing sticks to cured silicone- so it has to go. scrape it out with fresh single edged razor blades, keep scraping until it is whistle clean.
 

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1.0 D. Leucomelas - 8 E. Anthonyi - 2 D. Tinctorius 'Tumucumaque'
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you very much! I will look into the options
 

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Best in the long-term is definitely a replace of the glass. You could also move the ventilation strip up higher (right under the door).

Easiest - you could just silicone over all / most of the strip from the inside. Use masking tape to cover off any part you don't want to cover.
 

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I would just remove the whole front, cut a new piece of glass, adjust the tracks and sliding doors and call it done.
Best in the long-term is definitely a replace of the glass. You could also move the ventilation strip up higher (right under the door).
Me too.
  • The space occupied by that whole lower front assembly ought to just be a single piece of glass - that would be a good depth for a drainage layer / false bottom, plus a layer of substrate.
  • Above that - starting about where the current lower door track is - you could install a vent, then a track & bypass doors above the vent.
  • There are various ways to either make it functional plus look nice (more effort), or just make it functional (less effort). The difference in required effort is not that large, but the difference in appearance would be substantial (half-assing it would be a relatively poor investment IMO). Personally I would bite the bullet and get after that "gut and remodel".
  • I would start by just ripping out that lower front, and replacing the first lower pane. Then do a leak test before adding the new vent and track above that. Hopefully you nail the seal job on your first try. Scrape it down to bare glass, and get that glass nice and clean so yuor new silicone bonds well and you get it leak-free.
Good luck!
 

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1.0 D. Leucomelas - 8 E. Anthonyi - 2 D. Tinctorius 'Tumucumaque'
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I would definitely like to just replace the glass, but sadly that small piece of glass would already cost over 20 euros, without shipping. I'm still going to think about it, but I am probably going to go with the masking tape siliconing on the inside.
Thank you all for the suggestions!
 

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Ship glass? My mind is reeling.

That's the Dutch flag under your name, right? Are there not neighborhood window & mirror shops in the Netherlands? That you can just walk in to, place your order of a few small pieces, and come back in a few days? Or, to buy a big-enough single piece right when you first walk in, and take it home to do all your own cutting? Cutting normal soda-lime "float" glass (not tempered or otherwise "special") isn't really that hard.
 

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I would definitely like to just replace the glass, but sadly that small piece of glass would already cost over 20 euros, without shipping. I'm still going to think about it, but I am probably going to go with the masking tape siliconing on the inside.
Thank you all for the suggestions!
I would do some searching my friend. It seems highly unlikely you don't have a glass shop, or some other shop that cuts glass, somewhere near you.
 
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