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Hi. I have 2 pocadotted neo bromeliads connected to each other at the base, I don't want to kill them, but how do I separate the 2? The thing connecting them together feels almost like wood, and both the broms I think got this way when they were just pupping.
 

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you should just be able to cut the connecting 'stem' as close as possible to the one staying in place. then remove the one with the stem still attached and plant that where you want. i've done this a few times and had good results :)
 

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you should just be able to cut the connecting 'stem' as close as possible to the one staying in place. then remove the one with the stem still attached and plant that where you want. i've done this a few times and had good results :)
Even if neither have roots started yet?
 

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Ooooh I dont know on the roots question. My giant brom pups all the time and I just take a sharp serated knife and saw it off LOL. I dont know if thats the proper way but it works for me. Mine have always been rooted though.
 

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Sorry for my ignorance, but do you mean cut the two like in the horribly drawn picture I made? (I've been wondering about this as well)
 

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Sorry for my ignorance, but do you mean cut the two like in the horribly drawn picture I made? (I've been wondering about this as well)
No, here's a picture of what I mean. They're both the same sized broms.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
As you can sort of see, they're both connected by a 3 inch long stick like thing.
 

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Just to be clear:
Mother plant = The main plant. Pup/Offset = smaller bromeliad. Stolon = Wood stick thing. :p

General rule of thumb is if the pup is 1/3 the size of the mother plant, it's safe to remove. You want to be 100% sure the pup can hold water by itself before removing it - regardless of size. Neoregelias are epiphytes and they don't need roots to survive. The roots are mainly for gripping their surroundings - not to absorb water (although they can absorb water). This is the main reason you want Neoregelias out of substrate - mounted to a background. If they are left in soil (where they wouldn't naturally grow, anyway) the plant will rot.

You want to clip the stolon as close to the mother plant as possible without damaging it. These are best separated with pruning scissors - but a razor or knife will work too. Breaking it off of the base of the mother by hand (just by twisting) can damage the mother plant's ability to hold water.

Mount the pup wherever is appropriate and you'll see it throw roots out within a couple weeks.


Ugly temporary viv - but you can clearly see the roots growing out of a freshly cut pup. The pup was 100% bare when it was first placed in there - and those roots only took a couple weeks to develop. Pups take much longer to acclimate than mother plants, which is why it's always a better bet to buy mother plants over pups if possible.

Hope this helps!
 

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Thanks so much, that really helped! I'll snip it off right now. I actually thought it was a dis formed bromeliad or something, so I put water in both. Holds water just fine. Thanks!
 

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Ok. Here's the pup I cut off, and after cutting off excess dead roots from the mother, I noticed josh's frogs cut off from it before, so it had 2 pups that were huge. Will the roots sprout out of the stolon or out of the base? Thanks! Here's pics

This is the pup


This is the huge stolon
 

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...Pups take much longer to acclimate than mother plants, which is why it's always a better bet to buy mother plants over pups if possible.
I'll have to respectfully disagree on this one. I recommend the exact opposite. Pups are better bc they have not sat in a particular environment their entire lives so they adjust better than a fully grown mother plant that has more than likely been growing in one environment and has adjusted completely to it. Especially mother plants that are grown in lots of sun in a shade house then tossed into a wet humid viv. Lots of times they rot.
 

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I'll have to respectfully disagree on this one. I recommend the exact opposite. Pups are better bc they have not sat in a particular environment their entire lives so they adjust better than a fully grown mother plant that has more than likely been growing in one environment and has adjusted completely to it. Especially mother plants that are grown in lots of sun in a shade house then tossed into a wet humid viv. Lots of times they rot.
Really? I've had the opposite experience... Not so much with pups rotting - but with them developing extremely slowly compared to a mature plant. A more mature plant (for me at least) seems to throw roots and acclimate much faster, and of course it'll throw pups much sooner than an offset would.

The only mature plants that I've seen rot when placed in a vivarium are the softer leaf varieties. :confused: Most of our vivariums that we build aren't huge, tho - so that could account for our different experiences.

Respectfully, of course Antone! :)
 
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