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See Poynton, Sarah L.; Whitaker, Brent R.; 1994; Protozoa in poison dart frogs (Dendrobatidae): clinical assessment and identification; Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine 25(1): 29-39

They indicate that there was no difference in prevelance of infection of protozoa between wild caught D. auratus and frogs maintained subsequently in captivity and that most of the intenstional protozoal apprear to be commensuals rather than parasites.

Ed
 

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Hey Rich or anyone else,
How about posting a pic of a typical hookworm found in PDFs. They seem to be a pretty common parasite.
 

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lamaster said:
Rich,

Did they state a reason why they have less true parasites? Maybe because of their toxicity? Also I know what you are talking about when you say you need a trained eye for spotting parasites. With all the different kinds of nematodes (which all basically look the same and don't all cause disease ex: plant nematodes) and normal intestinal fauna it is hard to differentiate between disease causing organisms.

Mike
Mike, sinse it is endoparasites we are talking about I doubt it could be because of skin toxins. But I'm not 100% sure.
"They" would be me and my brother and I can only speculate that not walking around in their own infested crap all day in a ten gal may be one reason.
I have looked at a number of fecals and all I can say is I am very glad to have a brother with an experienced eye to look things over.

Rich

Rich
 

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Ed said:
See Poynton, Sarah L.; Whitaker, Brent R.; 1994; Protozoa in poison dart frogs (Dendrobatidae): clinical assessment and identification; Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine 25(1): 29-39

They indicate that there was no difference in prevelance of infection of protozoa between wild caught D. auratus and frogs maintained subsequently in captivity and that most of the intenstional protozoal apprear to be commensuals rather than parasites.

Ed
Ed, not sure why you bring this up. Was it to point out that that most/many protozoa are not issues (parasites) with darts , as we have agreed to. Or that non-parasites are about the same in the wild and captivity?

Rich
 

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pl259 said:
Hey Rich or anyone else,
How about posting a pic of a typical hookworm found in PDFs. They seem to be a pretty common parasite.
I do not have any. But my brother does. I ask the next time I talk to him.

Rich
 

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Rich Frye said:
Ed said:
See Poynton, Sarah L.; Whitaker, Brent R.; 1994; Protozoa in poison dart frogs (Dendrobatidae): clinical assessment and identification; Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine 25(1): 29-39

They indicate that there was no difference in prevelance of infection of protozoa between wild caught D. auratus and frogs maintained subsequently in captivity and that most of the intenstional protozoal apprear to be commensuals rather than parasites.

Ed
Ed, not sure why you bring this up. Was it to point out that that most/many protozoa are not issues (parasites) with darts , as we have agreed to. Or that non-parasites are about the same in the wild and captivity?

Rich
Actually both Rich..

Ed
 

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Rich,

I know they hold keep the toxins in the skin. I was thinking since they make the toxins from a food source maybe there would be small amounts of toxins in the G.I. tract. I don't really know how the whole process works. I guess I am just wondering if they metabolize the toxins or just store the toxins they collect from the prey. I think same organisms like the Monarch butterfly just store the toxin and dont create it. I find it interesting so any information would be helpful thanks.

Mike
 

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Mike,
I'm not a toxin expert , but I am fairly sure the toxins are restricted to the skin. It should not be tough to deduct that at least one very big reason CBs not properly quarantined would have more true parasites would be the fact they are walking in their own infested poop day in and day out.
Rich
 

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Rich

I understand the whole walking in their feces all day. That is why I can wait to put my frogs into my vivs after a proper quarantine. Also, thanks with your input on the toxins I know there are very limited resources on the topic.

Mike
 
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