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Yeah so I've had a problem with mealy bugs attacking my houseplants and now it seems aphids have attacked my habaneros (hope they aren't too spicey for the frogs).



My first question are these infact aphids?
If so how do I culture them? I'm thinking about setting up a 5.5 gallon tank to put them in. Should I just add small potted plants for them to feed on?

does the substrate matter? should it be humid? dry? room temp?
They don't seem to move to fast, but I haven't watched them to closesly are people sure the frogs will eat them?

thanks,
-Tad
 

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Hi Tad

Aphids love fava beans. (Insert Hannibal Lectner joke here). You can pick some up at any ol place just about. Online too. They take a bit of time to grow, and are like a vine so give them something to grab onto. But once they get started stand back! Add the aphids after they have been a bit established. Fava beans need good soil, lots of water, and light. Treat them like tomatoes and you should be doing well. The aphids will take some time to get established too. But they will. When you get that glassy sheen on the leaves after the aphids get going, it is harvest time. Snip off a branch here and there and drop it in your tank and the frogs will love them. My observations are that aphids are a great way to put some size on your froglets.
Hope that helps,
Dave
 

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Supposidly aphids don't ship well. I've always grabbed some from outside during the summer (man do my frogs love'm) and tossed'm in. My next big step is to culture them... but its honestly easier to get them from outside than to try and get some shipped. During summer months you can also try and get someone either with an infested plant or with cultures (if anyone does really culture them) to a frog/reptile show you are at.

I personally stole my sis's hanging basket that was covered in them and used that :)

Maybe they don't ship well because they are sent with seedling plants? or cuttings that go bad quickly... the shuffling and tossing of the box probibly doesn't help either. Wouldn't they need the flow of the plant juices (which they feed on) that wouldnt' be found in a cutting?
 

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they shouldn't be difficult to culture. and because they are parthenogenic they should reproduce fairly rapidly
 

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Aphids do not ship well

Aphids do not ship well. They dessicate really easily, we have never looked into FDA permits for them, but I suspect that they would object to aphids as they are a pest insect. However, try the fava bean method, you'll be really glad you did.
Dave
 

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There are many different type of Aphids, most are plant (and close relatives) specifics. You most likely not be able to culture aphids from habaneros on fava beans plants.

I'd say plant a jonagold apple tree... if you're lucky, you could get 3 species of Aphids on it. :shock:

SB
 

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Aphids can be purchased from a biological supply house. If you want their link send me a PM.


I have cultured a local aphid of and on for years. They are available every spring on a weed that infests my yard. I collect a colony and then sprout seeds for new host plants. You need to be fairly diligent with setting up the new plants, about every 5 days or so with these. If the next set of hosts don't have enough true leaves to support the colony it will crash and then you start all over again. I have also made screen cages and surrounded infested weeds in the yard to protect them from ladybugs. Then you can harvest as needed. When the protected plant begins to wither you can shake a few aphids into the screen cage and move it to a new host to become infested.

The BDG has some good info on culture as well.

John R.
 
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