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I picked up I used Exo Terra terrarium and wondering what's the best or proper way to clean for frogs? Should I just use bleach and water? It housed a gecko for a few months.

Does it matter what was kept in the terrarium? I mean is there any reptile that you wouldn't want a used terrarium from, snake, gecko, turtle, etc,etc,etc?

Thanks
Steve
 

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I use both of these products...the first one is safe to use with the animals occupying the tank and the second I used to clean the tank during a deep cleaning with no animals inside the tank....both work great. but the first one is your best choice.


* Terrarium and aquarium cleaner eliminates reptile odors and stains
* Safe, water-based hypoallergenic formula contains no irritants or chemicals
* Cleans reptile habitats, heat rocks, gravel, artificial plants, and more
Safely and effectively clean any reptile terrarium, aquarium, and habitat accessory. Water-based, 100% all natural enzyme cleaner and deodorizer easily eliminates odors and stains from organic animal and food waste. Biodegradable, hypoallergenic formula contains no irritants or harsh chemicals. Instead, its natural enzymes harmlessly break down organic contaminants on terrarium glass, heat rocks, gravel substrate, artificial plants, and more to create a clean and healthier pet environment. Choose convenient 22 oz Trigger Spray bottle or economical 1 gallon Refill.
source:
Reptile Cage Cleaners: Natural Chemistry Healthy Habitat Spray at Drs. Foster & Smith



Terrarium Cleaner
Effective cleaner for a clearer view
100% safe deodorizer, dust repellent
Quick and easy to use on any surface

An All-Purpose Cleaner For Reptile And Amphibian Habitats

Get a better look at your reptile’s world without introducing harmful chemicals. R-Zilla Terrarium Cleaner adds a brilliant clear shine to glass, acrylic or any hard, shiny and non-absorbent surface, with a formula that is 100% natural and contains no toxins, fumes or residues. The formula also adds a non-toxic deodorizer and anti-static ingredient that controls dust buildup. Use it on terrariums, water bowls, food bowls, plastic and silk plants, hiding places, cage décor and furniture. Simply spray and rub briskly with a soft cloth, polishing the surface to a brilliant sheen.
source:
Zilla - Where Reptiles Rule » Terrarium Cleaner | Products

I'm not sure where to find this one online but I'm sure you can find it eventually.


as far as the actual plants just wash them in a 10% solution and I have no idea how you could clean a background...you could spot test it with the products above and see if it discolors it.....it is made for artificial plants and cocofiber is real. if it doesn't discolor the background then just spray it down and use paper towel to soak/sop up the excess?
 

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When looking to clean an enclosure, you have to look for something that helps and does not leave any residue that can potentially be dangerous. With respect to amphibians there are only a couple that are considered safe
1) water (just plain water (yes tap water is fine))
2) bleach
3) ammonia.

Bleach and ammonia are the primary disinfectants used with amphibians because both if rinsed heavily will not leave a residue that can be harmful to amphibians. This is why products that contain surfactents (soaps, detergents) are not used unless multiple rinsing and scrubbing with plain water follows the use of soap.

Healthy habitat product is a deodorizer and does not kill bacteria. (See Products :: Natural Chemistry) the stabilizers added to keep the enzymes functional may be irritating to the skin of amphibians. You can access the MSDS right from that location. It has the following warnings about exposure

Emergency overview
May cause skin and eye irritation in susceptible persons.

.​
2. Hazards Identification​
space​
Routes of exposure
Potential short term health effects
Eye, Skin contact, Inhalation, Ingestion.​
space​
Eyes​
May cause irritation.

space​
Skin​
May cause irritation.

space​
Inhalation​
May cause respiratory tract irritation.

space​
Ingestion​
May cause stomach distress, nausea or vomiting.

space​
Target organs​
Eyes. Skin.

space​
Chronic effects​
Prolonged or repeated exposure can cause drying, defatting and dermatitis.

space​
Signs and symptoms Symptoms may include redness, edema, drying, defatting and cracking of the skin.


When cleaning the tank, all items that cannot be resterilized should be discarded unless the same frogs are being put back into the tank. This means, substrate, leaves, wood, and bark all should be double bagged and discarded into the municple trash system. Do not dump it out back or attempt to compost it as both methods place local frogs in danger of exposure to novel pathogens. Scrub the inside of the tank with water and a stiff brush to remove and adhered on organics that may shelter an unwanted organism. Once that is done use either ammonia or bleach but never both in a well ventilated area. Ammonia should be used at full strength right out of the bottle (this will kill coccidians like Cryptosporidia ssp (which bleach will not)) and allow for at least a 15 minute contact time. Rinse out the ammonia and allow to air dry. Once it is fully air dried, you can then clean it with other products. If cleaning with bleach, use the disinfection amount required on the bottle and again allow for a 15 minute contact time. Rinse out well and again allow to air dry until no further odor of bleach can be detected.

Ed


 

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When looking to clean an enclosure, you have to look for something that helps and does not leave any residue that can potentially be dangerous. With respect to amphibians there are only a couple that are considered safe
1) water (just plain water (yes tap water is fine))
2) bleach
3) ammonia.

Bleach and ammonia are the primary disinfectants used with amphibians because both if rinsed heavily will not leave a residue that can be harmful to amphibians. This is why products that contain surfactents (soaps, detergents) are not used unless multiple rinsing and scrubbing with plain water follows the use of soap.

Healthy habitat product is a deodorizer and does not kill bacteria. (See Products :: Natural Chemistry) the stabilizers added to keep the enzymes functional may be irritating to the skin of amphibians. You can access the MSDS right from that location. It has the following warnings about exposure



When cleaning the tank, all items that cannot be resterilized should be discarded unless the same frogs are being put back into the tank. This means, substrate, leaves, wood, and bark all should be double bagged and discarded into the municple trash system. Do not dump it out back or attempt to compost it as both methods place local frogs in danger of exposure to novel pathogens. Scrub the inside of the tank with water and a stiff brush to remove and adhered on organics that may shelter an unwanted organism. Once that is done use either ammonia or bleach but never both in a well ventilated area. Ammonia should be used at full strength right out of the bottle (this will kill coccidians like Cryptosporidia ssp (which bleach will not)) and allow for at least a 15 minute contact time. Rinse out the ammonia and allow to air dry. Once it is fully air dried, you can then clean it with other products. If cleaning with bleach, use the disinfection amount required on the bottle and again allow for a 15 minute contact time. Rinse out well and again allow to air dry until no further odor of bleach can be detected.

Ed




um Ed I dont think are allowed to put Non-Toxic on the bottle if it isn't.
idk where you're getting you info from and thos risk factors are probably for us humans.
it even says on the bottle of Natural Chemistry that it can be even used while the animals are in the tank....
I don't think Natural chemistry will put false info on their bottles
 

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When looking to clean an enclosure, you have to look for something that helps and does not leave any residue that can potentially be dangerous. With respect to amphibians there are only a couple that are considered safe
1) water (just plain water (yes tap water is fine))
2) bleach
3) ammonia.

Bleach and ammonia are the primary disinfectants used with amphibians because both if rinsed heavily will not leave a residue that can be harmful to amphibians. This is why products that contain surfactents (soaps, detergents) are not used unless multiple rinsing and scrubbing with plain water follows the use of soap.

Healthy habitat product is a deodorizer and does not kill bacteria. (See Products :: Natural Chemistry) the stabilizers added to keep the enzymes functional may be irritating to the skin of amphibians. You can access the MSDS right from that location. It has the following warnings about exposure



When cleaning the tank, all items that cannot be resterilized should be discarded unless the same frogs are being put back into the tank. This means, substrate, leaves, wood, and bark all should be double bagged and discarded into the municple trash system. Do not dump it out back or attempt to compost it as both methods place local frogs in danger of exposure to novel pathogens. Scrub the inside of the tank with water and a stiff brush to remove and adhered on organics that may shelter an unwanted organism. Once that is done use either ammonia or bleach but never both in a well ventilated area. Ammonia should be used at full strength right out of the bottle (this will kill coccidians like Cryptosporidia ssp (which bleach will not)) and allow for at least a 15 minute contact time. Rinse out the ammonia and allow to air dry. Once it is fully air dried, you can then clean it with other products. If cleaning with bleach, use the disinfection amount required on the bottle and again allow for a 15 minute contact time. Rinse out well and again allow to air dry until no further odor of bleach can be detected.

Ed




In case anyone just skimmed Ed's post, let me reiterate, do not use bleach and ammonia together.
 

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um Ed I dont think are allowed to put Non-Toxic on the bottle if it isn't.
idk where you're getting you info from and thos risk factors are probably for us humans.
it even says on the bottle of Natural Chemistry that it can be even used while the animals are in the tank....
I don't think Natural chemistry will put false info on their bottles

I'm guessing you didn't bother to follow the link I provided in the post and read the warnings for the actual MSDS provided by the manufacturer... which is why I also copied and posted it. I provided the source of the information so I'm not sure why you claim to not know where I got it as I was very specific.....

As for the use of nontoxic in the label, what is the definition of nontoxic with respect to those cleaners?

I should also add, if those are things that it can cause with people why do you think it wouldn't do it with amphibians considering that amphibians are considered to be more sensitive to effects like that....
 

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um Ed I dont think are allowed to put Non-Toxic on the bottle if it isn't.
idk where you're getting you info from and thos risk factors are probably for us humans.
it even says on the bottle of Natural Chemistry that it can be even used while the animals are in the tank....
I don't think Natural chemistry will put false info on their bottles
first off, people put false info on all sorts of products. that is a fact!!! furthermore Ed linked the material data saftey sheet from the manufacturer, which says clearly that it contains materials which can irritate amphibians.

use your head here. amphibian's skin is a PERMEABLE membrane (the reason they dont need to "drink" water) they are therefore FAR, FAR more sensitive than other animals.

and not to make Ed out to be some sort of omniscient frog god or anything, but your talking to a member who has many years of experience with amphibians, including a career related to their care ("amphibian specialist") as if you know better than he does on the subject. he even went to the trouble to LINK the freakin MSDS (from the product manufacturer) i hate to sound like an @ss, but you need to sort of learn where you fit in relation to others. you wouldnt tell an engineer how to build a bridge, or a neurosurgeon how to operate on a tumor, so why do you feel it necessary to imply that you know better than someone who has more experience and who has been a constant wealth of GOOD information here? look at the thanks the man has received? he certainly didnt get those from giving bad or inaccurate info.


as far as cleaning an enclosure, i'd strip anything organic and trash it. scrub the tank with a scouring pad, and fill the tank with a 15% bleach solution, let that sit for 10-30 minutes then rinse well.

james
 
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