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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Where would you place the drain for a flase bottom. Ive seen many viv's on the site dont have any visible drainage, as i was considering two drains in the front of the tank, just incase they need maintenance.

It would be perfectly feasable to put the drains under the falase bottom at the back, but i would never be able to unclog them if they bunged up, not that i can imagine anything bunging them up if their under the false bottom. I suppose i could use a pipe cleaner and push it up from underneath.

what do you guys do?
 

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Just hide a piece of pvc going down into the falsebottom so you can syphon out hte water. Just cover it with a rock or something.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Drill them! That made things so much easier for me when I had a good amount of tanks. I'll be setting up the next lab in a very similar manner.
j
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Drilling is the only way to go IMO, but would you place the drains accessably or would you try to hide them in the back under the false bottom, or have them coming up through the false bottom in an area where the water level comes above it, like in the ponds in the front.

Id plan on having a false bottom to drain the planted area in the back but in the front of the tank it would just have a bit of gravel in it. kind a like a shelf allong the back.

now would you put the drains in the front or would you put them under the back.

If their under the back the false bottom they will be protected from debris by the window screen, so i guess theres no chance of them blocking.
 

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I would suggest putting it in the back, under the false bottom. That way it is hidden, and like you said, there won't be anything to block the water flow.
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The false bottom vivs that I have constructed, have a pump that keeps the water circulating over a waterfall or other water feature. I can easily connect a long silicone hose to the water outlet and then drain the water into a bucket . Once the water is is drained,mm I refill it back up to the previous depth and repeat the cycle once more. In tanks that don't have a false bottom, I create a depression in the gravel that will allow easy access to the water that collects in the bottom. This is easily removed with a turkey baster or similar aparatus. I've noticed that after changing the water 2-3 times a month for 6-12 months, the water no longer needs to be changed as the natural microbial action takes care of the cleansing. The only time water needs to be drained off is when it gets too deep from misting. Hope this helps.

-Bill J.
 

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If you leave a pipe attatched to you're drain, it might get clogged with roots, but that's the only problem I can think of.
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I dont know about false bottoms but with my gravel based tank i just put a peice of pipe with holes drilled in it. It works on idea that if the holes are at the bottom and the tube is of a smaller diamiter the water level insideis higher than the basin I *think* it has something to do with hydrostatic pressure.
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
There seems to be 3 different set ups here, false bottoms, gravel bottoms, and false bottoms with sumps. Im not really one for mouthfulls of stinky water, so being of the fish keeping fraternity ill be going with a nice big sump. Im hoping that if i keep the false bottom high enough at the back ill be able to get away with hiding the drains underneath. I want good clearance from the water at the rear for two reasons, firstly so that i can have good drainage for orchids and simmilar plants, and secondly i want large multi level terraces. I think ill be going to hide the drains at the back on this one, ill got for two just to be on the safe side.

OK second question, for those of you who have external humidifiers, like the Borneco Ultrasonic. Where you have the ultrasonic plumbed in through a bulkhead, have you used any sort of grill to protect curious frog's from a long trip down a dark pipe.

going to try and get some drawings together so you guys can check my styles. im thinking of using allot of great stuff and window screen.
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Hello,

I drain all my tanks, some in the back some in the front.
I like the drain in the front on my rack, so if I remove a tanks I and reach
all the plumbing easy. If the tanks is a display tanks then I try to put the drains in the rear.

When adding an ultrasonic humidifier I use bulkheads from Pent-Air. Not sure who in London would carry them, but in the states I get them from
http://www.fishsupply.com/cgi-bin/f2/common/store.cgi?dbname=f2&path=top/S/SQ/DQBLK

On the inside of the strainer I would add screen, I lost a baby reticulatus this way.
 
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Now that is a very generous offer. I remember drilling 16 tanks for the lab took hours and hours to do. I had in my mind that drilling glass would be like drilling wood in the beginning, but it's more like scratching. Ben, I'd drive a u-haul to you when I set up the new lab, it would be worth the drive not to have to drill! Still with that said, it was definitely worth it!
j
 
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I have drilled glass and if your new to it get the right stuff ready, then try it out on some thing that doesnt cost allot. I use cheap foutain pumps from the pet store cost like 12 bucks. I run a tube behind a peice of cork bark and when i need to drain i just plug them in for a sec and drains into a gallon jug. I then use it to water my plants outside. :D
 

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Thanks for the offer ben, but i live no where near kansas. Ill look for glass shops around here capable of drilling aquariums.

Thanks again.

M.N
 

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Just make sure that the aquariums you're trying to get drilled aren't made from tempered glass. It's impossible to drill without shattering.
 
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Yeager said:
Now that is a very generous offer. I remember drilling 16 tanks for the lab took hours and hours to do. I had in my mind that drilling glass would be like drilling wood in the beginning, but it's more like scratching. Ben, I'd drive a u-haul to you when I set up the new lab, it would be worth the drive not to have to drill! Still with that said, it was definitely worth it!
j
What can I say Justin... I am just a NICE GUY ;)
For 16 tank, you would have to bring some BEER too!
I will admit you can just sit back for awhile when you start to drill tanks. The bigger holes I use for drains take 15-30mins per hole, but I can drill the misting 10mm hole in less than 5.
I need to update the website, but we started using a cutting fluid and DAP to create a moat and the drill times have improved!
 

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Ben,

Do you have any pics of the tanks with the front mounted drains? I would like to see that, it sounds like a good idea. When i move i'll have less space and it will be tough to utilize the drains i have in the bottoms of my tanks now.

Thanks!
 
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Arklier said:
Just make sure that the aquariums you're trying to get drilled aren't made from tempered glass. It's impossible to drill without shattering.
I will second this! Watch out for tempered glass it CAN"T be drilled.
All Glass Aquariums doesn't start using tempered glass until you get to 37 gallons. I believe it is only used in the bottoms.
Here is their tech sheet: Tech
 
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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
mindcrash said:
Ben,

Do you have any pics of the tanks with the front mounted drains? I would like to see that, it sounds like a good idea. When i move i'll have less space and it will be tough to utilize the drains i have in the bottoms of my tanks now.

Thanks!
Hey,

I don't have alot of pictures up yet, but I will see it Ican get to it tonight.
Here is one picture I have now.
 
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