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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys

I have finally got my leucomelas. I have 3, very young still, according to the seller around 10-12 weeks out of water.

I have put them straight in the tank.
I have put dusted flies in there but they didn't attract much attention!
I have seen the frogs hunting springtails though.
Is that going to be okay for now and if not, how do I ensure that the froggies eat dusted flies?

Best,
 

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Easiest way? Making sure the frogs are hungry. Meaning there are very little / no flies (you'll always miss some) left in the viv from the prior feeding. They will get the hang of it over time and if you feed on a schedule be waiting for the flies.

Key thing is not to over-feed since the flies will clean off and just be sitting around the viv - if you want to feed more, increase the frequency, not the quantity.

You can also add a piece of fruit to the tank for them to cluster around for easy pickings.

If you just added them to the tank they may need some time to get used to their new home. What kind of flies / supplements are you using? For young frogs (yours are very young - who sold them to you?) you want to go as small as possible (or even try dusting springtails if you have a culture - huge pain btw).
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Should I not worry for the time being then?

They are tiny - I am new to the hobby and didn't know that they are too young. What should I do?

I don't know if making sure that they are hungry is viable - there's so many spring tails!
 

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Should I not worry for the time being then?

They are tiny - I am new to the hobby and didn't know that they are too young. What should I do?

I don't know if making sure that they are hungry is viable - there's so many spring tails!
Your frogs will always be hungry - as long as the enclosure isn't FULL of flies. Just keep an eye on the top edge of plants and see if you can "easily" spot flies. If yes, wait a day to feed or skip a feeding. If no, feed. Smaller and more frequent feedings are also helpful, especially for smaller / younger frogs.

Your frogs are VERY young (perhaps worryingly so) - do you have any pictures? They will at most eat the smallest melanogaster you can find. What kind of fly are you feeding?

Young frogs also need supplements more importantly than others. So important to make sure they get some (good of you to ask!). I presume you don't have a calcium heavy substrate, so it might be a good idea to gut-load some of your springtails.

In my grow outs (other than a calcium-heavy substrate) I add a VERY little "pile" of bakers yeast mixed with repashy cal+ (what kind of supplement do you use?). The springtails eat that and hopefully pick up some Cal+ along the way - and it also makes easy picking for your young frogs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I have put some hydei yesterday and they are still there.
I'm gonna get the melanogaster tomorrow.
Dammit now I am worried the frogs are too young.
I use repashy calcium plus.

Do you think adding it to the substrate will help?
 

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I have put some hydei yesterday and they are still there.
I'm gonna get the melanogaster tomorrow.
Dammit now I am worried the frogs are too young.
I use repashy calcium plus.

Do you think adding it to the substrate will help?

Hydei are wayyyyy too large for these guys. Anything they eat will be smaller than the space between their eyes (rough guess).

You should be ok - just feed as though you would a grow-out tank. So every 1-2 days with dusted flies. You want to get these guys on supplements as soon as possible. If they are out and about that's usually a good sign that they are healthy / happy.

Rep cal+ is the way to go.

Happy to have a look at the tank / viv as well in case that's helpful to you. Key is to have plenty of leaf litter.
 

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12 weeks is basically 3 months. I'm not sure why anyone is saying that's too young to sell froglets. Definitely switch out the hydei for melongasters. You'll see them eating once they have a fly they can fit in their mouth.
 

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Sometimes its desirable to get babies before any damage is done. In other words start them yourself.
 

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Don’t add Repashy Calcium Plus to the substrate. Do get melanogaster ASAP.

Continue supporting the micro fauna population by adding small bits of mushroom/fruit scraps to keep a foodstuff going until you can get dusted melanogaster.

3 baby leucs probably eat much less than you think, so don’t add tons of flies. A feeding station will be super helpful to monitor the quantity of leftover flies, and to ensure easy access for the frogs.

Another tip for checking on how many flies are leftover in the viv: blow into it. Insects are usually sensitive to increased CO2 levels, and your breath will make them all freak out for a second. You’d be surprised how many might be sitting motionless in the leaf litter.
 

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Don’t add Repashy Calcium Plus to the substrate.
Was not suggesting to do that. Don't do that - sorry I missed your question. You should only apply that to any FFs or potentially any food they eat (e.g. a slice of fruit that will serve as a feeding station) to gut-load. Randomly applying to the substrate won't help.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Okay I have melanogaster!
First of all, I did accidentally spilt some repashy in the Viv, just a small patch - is that a problem?
Second of all, I think there's mites in this melanogaster I got - I can see small whitish dots - not moving though.
Can I still feed them?
 

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Excess dust from dumping the flies is fine. I just wouldn’t add intentional quantities of the supplement to the substrate- isopods can accumulate certain fat-soluble vitamins, and it’s probably a fast road to too much mineral salts in the soil.

White motionless spots in the cultures can just be fly pool. Moving spots are likely detritivore mites, which are literally everywhere- including every vivarium, are fine-ish. You want to take steps to minimize mites in your cultures to keep fly production high; diatomaceous earth, mite paper, etc. Also, cultures from stores are often heavily loaded with mites.
 

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Excess dust from dumping the flies is fine. I just wouldn’t add intentional quantities of the supplement to the substrate- isopods can accumulate certain fat-soluble vitamins, and it’s probably a fast road to too much mineral salts in the soil.

White motionless spots in the cultures can just be fly pool. Moving spots are likely detritivore mites, which are literally everywhere- including every vivarium, are fine-ish. You want to take steps to minimize mites in your cultures to keep fly production high; diatomaceous earth, mite paper, etc. Also, cultures from stores are often heavily loaded with mites.
There was a thread on here back in the day that suggested that dusting your flies in calcium powder (standard non-D3 calcium) helps prevent mite transfer. I've done it with all my new cultures and I haven't had a problem with mites or crashed cultures since I started doing it. Of course, I also keep my cultures on mite paper or surfaces treated with provent-a-mite.
 

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There was a thread on here back in the day that suggested that dusting your flies in calcium powder (standard non-D3 calcium) helps prevent mite transfer. I've done it with all my new cultures and I haven't had a problem with mites or crashed cultures since I started doing it.
Same. If I ever have to buy a culture from a store, the first thing I do is start a fresh one with a proper dusting.
 

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Same. If I ever have to buy a culture from a store, the first thing I do is start a fresh one with a proper dusting.
I keep my cultures in little 2.5-3 gal plastic boxes with a nice layer of diatomaceous earth at the bottom. Keeps mites out and has the added benefit of being able to move several cultures at once and serving as a fly trap to any flies that escape (they like the smell). Clean out / replace the diatomaceous earth once every few months and you're golden. Might even be cheaper.

Little bit of cal+ in a viv happens during feeding. Doesn't bother anyone but if you find it unsightly you can always dump them on a leaf and then remove / replace it every few weeks (or flip it over).
 

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Little bit of cal+ in a viv happens during feeding. Doesn't bother anyone but if you find it unsightly you can always dump them on a leaf and then remove / replace it every few weeks (or flip it over).
Honestly me. I just put a spray bottle on stream and hit the pile of vit powder to wash it off the leaf. When it happens. My OCD has gotten quite good and tapping out flies without spilling powder.
 
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