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So yeah, how do they sleep? I've only had my frogs for a few weeks, and I've seen them blink, but I don't know if they sleep with their eyes closed.

I saw one of my frogs just lying with its chin and stomach on the floor (after their bedtime) and kinda panicked a bit... so I nudged him and he sprang back to life, so I guess he was sleeping?
 

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I'm not sure if a frog closing it's eyes is common to most species, but what I do know is that there are people, as well as some animals, that can and will sleep with their eyes open. They may be drifting in and out of sleep while their eyes are open.

The resting stance is something like this...



While the active stance is similar to this...



Those are just random frogs that I thought illustrated what I was talking about the best. The first one isn't asleep, but he isn't in an active position.
 

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Hmmm so my frogs are azureus. What are their "normal" sleeping habits like?
I have no clue because I've never owned a tropical frog. :eek:
I would assume most Tinctorious do the same when sleeping. Considering they aren't much of climbers, they probably find a place to hide with good cover (diftwood, broad leaf, etc.) and lay down like you said yours did before you nudged him. Chin and stomach on floor (like the frog in the first picture I posted) with legs tucked in.

Don't worry about if they're getting their sleep. When they need to they will, just like how humans will fall asleep when tired. If you're worried about them, shine a dim light on them and see if they're breathing. You may see a twitch on the upper body or on the throat. Don't panic if you don't see them breathing, just give them a few minutes to see if they are breathing. Their breathing pattern will slow during rest. Shining a light on them to wake them up may be more pleasant than a startling stressful nudge.
 

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Hmmm so my frogs are azureus. What are their "normal" sleeping habits like?
I really can`t see my female Azurues when she sleeps because she hides behide a coco hut.
But if were to venture a guess, she has quite the set up back there.
Perhaps a queen size bed with a nice chest of drawers and a make up table.

John
 

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I think the frogs that use their eyes to force prey down their throats tend to sleep with eyes(mostly) closed, while small active species that eat very small prey and do not utilize the eyes as a means to push prey down tend to sleep with a "dimmed glaze" to the eyes that are not looking at anything. As was said previosly, the legs and arms will be tucked as well as the chin.

JBear
 

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I think the frogs that use their eyes to force prey down their throats tend to sleep with eyes(mostly) closed, while small active species that eat very small prey and do not utilize the eyes as a means to push prey down tend to sleep with a "dimmed glaze" to the eyes that are not looking at anything. As was said previosly, the legs and arms will be tucked as well as the chin.

JBear
Really all frogs use their eyes to push down food. Their tongue is used only for catching prey, it does not help push food down, so that reason they use their eyes, and sink them down into their skulls to push the food along.
 

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I appreciate the correction. I have never seen a dart frog sink it's eyes down when feeding though...?

I watched a toad(Fowler's) eat a earthworm the other day. It was shoving it's front hand against his throat forcing the worm down. Kind of like a clawed frog eats but focused on the throat and not pushing the item in. It was cool stuff. The toad used it's eyes as well to swallow.

JBear
 

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Yeah it's really hard to see darts do it, but they actually do sink their eyes in to. It's really quick though. Some larger toads and frogs will shove their hands in their mouth when feeding to help push food in their mouth, but will usually always sink their eyes in to help swallow it.
 

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my leucomela tends to sleep in weard positions i seen it for my self ill try and post a picture he usually sleeps in his bromiliad and when open the viv he wakes up and tries to hide
 
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