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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
So I am a little over 3 months into my first set of frogs. I have 4 d. Tinctorius Patricia F1's in a 48"x18"x18" paludarium. The land area is about 36"x14"x12". All bioactive with white dwarf iso's and springtails. Because I never see these guys, do I need to occasionally restock them or should they be fine on their own reproducing? I use a Hygger LED light that operates on whatever the default sun-up/sun- down schedule is (can't figure out how to adjust it, terrible interface). I have never changed the substrate or leaf litter, mostly because it seems like a huge pain in the ass. Is this something that I have to do? The mist king runs off of a hygrostat-thermometer and the tank stays between 68-72°F and humidity stays between 80%-90%. I started off feeding them Melanogasters but I recently switched to Hydei as they seem to be more active and more fun for the frogs to hunt. Plus they're bigger. I have only ever dusted with Tetra Reptocal because that's all my local store had and everywhere online is constantly out of stock of other things. Is this ok or should I really be supplementing with other things? In the water I have white cloud mountain minnows, snails, and cherry shrimp just to add another element in the tank while keeping it low maintenance. The moss are all varieties that I gathered and cleaned. Most of it doesn't seem to be enjoying this climate very much, looking like brown shag rugs. I tried a slurry in various places after the fact. It seems to be doing very well by the waterfall but just dried up everywhere else. The frogs have never had any issues with the water, and in the 2 instances where they ended up jumping in due to me messing with some plants they were able to crawl out quickly. The tank is in the living room. I am torn because the tank gets a fair amount of light pollution after the LEDs shut off due to us being up and still using the room, but anywhere else it would not be viewed or enjoyed as much. They tend to stay in the back of the tank where it is darkest under the thick flora, but will show themselves from time to time. View attachment 303567 View attachment 303568 View attachment 303569 View attachment 303570 View attachment 303571 View attachment 303572 View attachment 303573 View attachment 303574 View attachment 303575 View attachment 303576 View attachment 303576
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Plant Terrestrial plant Leaf vegetable Adaptation Grass

Plant Poison dart frog Botany Organism Terrestrial plant

Plant Natural landscape Wood Terrestrial plant Grass

Plant Botany Water Natural environment Vegetation

Vertebrate Plant Marine invertebrates Terrestrial plant Fawn

Wood Trunk Terrestrial plant Bedrock Electric blue

Water resources Plant Water Leaf Natural landscape

Plant Plant community Branch Terrestrial plant Organism

Leaf Plant Botany Organism Terrestrial plant

Poison dart frog Botany Organism Terrestrial plant Frog
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'm going to leave comments on the tank setup for others. But one thing I'm not seeing is any leaf litter, frogs should have a nice thick layer of leaf litter covering all the substrate.
Plant Terrestrial plant Terrestrial animal Wood Grass


Sphagnum moss on the substrate, plus water feature will = gross soggy mess
Yes. Should I do away with the sphagnum on top of the soil substrate?
 

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I’m not a frog guy, but I’ll take a shot at this. For starters, I love paludariums. However, I don’t think they’re the best fit for most poison dart frogs with the exception of possibly Epipedobates Anthonyi or some Mantella frog species (dart frog experts correct me if I’m wrong). The rationale behind this is that since most PDFs aren’t aquatic in nature, the water portion will subtract those valuable square inches from area that they could use if it were left terrestrial. Also, unless carefully constructed by experienced builders, paludariums tend to routinely have substrate that is too moist for moist PDFs.

I feel as though you did a great job putting this enclosure together. It is both visually appealing and well laid out…just not for your chosen terrestrial inhabitants.

Please forgive me as my last comment is probably undeserving and possibly nonconstructive: If you would’ve spend more time researching the natural biome these creatures inhabit and see how hobbyist successfully keep them, you would’ve learned how to properly house them yourself.

With that being said; continue to read, learn and grow. This of a great place for all of the aforementioned. Good luck!
 

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Great Palu but not at all suitable for Dart Frogs. They would not be found anywhere like that design, in situ.

Simple solution - just make another proper vivarium for the Dart frogs and then research a proper species for the Palu.
 

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This tank is not ideal for dendrobatids. When keeping animals in captivity, we have the responsibility to optimize the entire enclosure to their needs. The water feature does more harm than good; it saturates the substrate, makes the humidity too high, presents places for harmful bacteria buildup, poses a small, but present drowning risk, and takes up usable space.
Furthermore, you have multiple species of vertebrates in this enclosure. This can be done by some (usually just zoological institutions), but it forces compromise in the setup-as mentioned, the tank is probably too wet for dendrobatids, and it minimizes space for both the fish and the frogs. Community enclosures also present the risk of pathogen transfer.
Dendrobatids, almost without exception, have access to leaf litter in the wild. They forage in it, hide in it, and climb on it. It provides topographical diversity, microclimates, dry spaces to rest their feet, and a surface that prevents the ingestion of substrate, thereby preventing impaction.
There is a lot of misinformation out there on dendrobatid husbandry, so it is by no means your fault that your enclosure is not ideal. I hope this helped! :)
 
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