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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I noticed some of my plants have leaves that don't seem to be healthy. Can anyone more experienced tell me what seems to be the problem from the pictures? Thanks!
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I'm not a professional horticulturist but I play one on TV.
Anyway what I think it might be this;

I notice that some edges of leaves curl inward and form a cup. The upper leaves might be most affected.

Possible cause could be heat stress causes rapid evaporation, so plants curl up to conserve moisture. Plants too close to high-intensity lights are prone to heat stress, but it can be a problem in any room where temperatures are persistently above 80 degrees F.

If you do not have fans get a micro fan or more from Amazon to blow out hot air and bring in cooler fresh air. They will also keep the inside from becoming stagnant.

Also invest in a hygrometer/thermometer Maintain constant ventilation and allow sufficient space between plants and lights.

These ideas are if you might have these things in place.

I hope this helps.

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Yes. See the pics below. Pretty good little fans and very quite.
Only thing you may want to do is cover the opening with window screen.

I have not covered mine yet. Before I add my frogs I will.

Below is a picture if one of my fans.


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Greetings,

What is the substrate where these plants are planted?

They don't look like they are experiencing heat or light stress - both should show more in the top of the plants rather than at only some leaf edges. I think too much humidity/lack of air movement may be a bigger problem. A fan would help.

@GEG64,

If that is the installed position of your fan in the last image you posted then you are wasting most of the energy you are using to power the fan. Fans pull air from behind them - if you obstruct them they will waste energy pulling against the background. In your case, the decreased airflow may be the right amount for the size of your viv but the fan will wear-out more quickly if it's obstructed.
 

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Greetings,

What is the substrate where these plants are planted?

They don't look like they are experiencing heat or light stress - both should show more in the top of the plants rather than at only some leaf edges. I think too much humidity/lack of air movement may be a bigger problem.
I was going to venture the same thing, that the plants were experiencing excessive moisture and water. Hard to say for sure though.
 

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True. It's not the permanent position for that fan.
After I cover the openings with screen it will be in a more optimal location.

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It’s unfortunate that symptoms of overwatering and underwatering are often the same. This happens because overwatering will rot roots, which then reduces the plant’s ability to absorb water and results in curled or yellowing leaves, etc. If your substrate feels wet and your humidity is constantly over 80%, I would suspect overwatering. If your substrate feels dry and your humidity is constantly under 60%, I would suspect underwatering.

Light stress would show up more in leaves closer to the light, and most leaves would turn yellow or a pale green (some get red or purple, I believe it depends on flower color). @kimcmich why would heat stress show up only at the top of the plant? Just because that’s closer to the heat source?
 

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Oh I have also seen crispy leaf edges (like you can see on the Peperomia) in Begonias when they were exposed to lower humidity and/or didn’t have a sufficient root system. Has that Peperomia been added or moved recently, anything that could have manually damaged the roots?
 

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@Harpspiel In principle, heat stress should show up more at the top - but in a small viv hot air may be top-to-bottom. Because the source of heat in many vivs is the light you usually see light and heat damage most at the top of the viv.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks everyone. Super helpful. I'm using the ABG mix from Josh's Frogs for substrate. I suspect the suggestion of too much humidity and not enough air flow could be the problem. My humidity is usually over 90% and I don't have a fan. Maybe that can solve my problem? Any advice on where and how exactly to install a fan like the one recommended above? Just under my ventilation strip in the lid? Or down lower in the viv somewhere?

I can't think of anything that would have manually damaged the roots on that plant, though it's possible. Maybe I'm overwatering it. It's strange that most plants I have are doing perfectly fine, but just the ones I posted pictures of seem to be showing some signs of trouble on the leaves. Maybe they are more sensitive to the conditions.
 

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Over 90% humidity is great for brief periods, but is too high as a constant. For both plants and frogs, I think the ideal is a variation in RH from 65-70% up to brief periods of 90%+. I think you will need a fan pointing at the ventilation strip in order to lower your humidity, and I would recommend cycles where you mist, let the plants soak it up for a few hours, and then run the fan until the humidity drops to around 65%. You can measure this with a hygrometer for a while to get a feel for it, and then just set the fans on a schedule that seems to accomplish what you want and tweak as necessary.

edit: I don't do frogs. Almost all tropical plants will enjoy periods of 65% (some pleurothallids and bryophytes aside) but that may be too low for the frogs, so hopefully someone else can chime in with the correct low end RH number. What you're going for is to reach a high point of 90%+ right when you mist, and then slowly drop it down to the correct low end number, and then once the fan turns off it will slowly go back up again.

edit 2: Your humidity will stratify from bottom to top of your tank. My tank is an extreme example, from 85% at the bottom to 25% up in the lid (again, no frogs). So your readings will change depending on where you put the hygrometer, but aiming for that low end number closer to the top is probably a good goal.
 

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Almost all tropical plants will enjoy periods of 65% (some pleurothallids and bryophytes aside) but that may be too low for the frogs, so hopefully someone else can chime in with the correct low end RH number.
I think one of the most stark differences between plants and frogs, regarding humidity anyway, is that plants cannot move themselves to more or less moist areas as needed. When RH drops, frogs go find some moisture -- they can drink to offset water losses from transpiration. But they also need to be able to find places -- and not just one place; they need a range of options -- that are drier, so they can get rid of some water, dry their feet, whatever. Most of the viv surfaces should be dry-ish, much of the time anyway, because there is always somewhere wetter in the viv.

For frogs, ventilation and misting factor together to yield humidity, but the first two factors are much more important than the RH reading -- like safe driving usually involves the car's speed falling in a certain range, but simply pegging the speedo between 45 and 65 (or whatever range) isn't going to equal safe driving, and just because things are going badly at 45mph doesn't necessarily entail that you should speed up, or that you should slow down.
 

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I am having this same problem where the edges turn brown and shrink even thought the plant keeps sprouting new leaves. Found out two of my humidity meters were defective reading 90-100% all the time. Bought 2 new ones and humidity on both read low.
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