Dendroboard banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
107 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have a 10 gallon bioactive vertical tank that has been set up for a couple months and wanted to know how others heat their tanks. The room that I keep it in sits at 65 degrees all the time and is heated via baseboard heaters (not great for humidity) so I really only need to get a 10 degree bump out of whatever heating method I go with (planning on a heating pad). I have not yet purchased a frog but have been playing around with the room's thermostat and have found that it probably isn't the best to heat the whole room just to keep one tank at 75 degrees - it also seems to reduce the humidity quite a bit even with almost all of the screen top covered.

A few questions:

1, a) Based on the reading I have done you want to keep your tank in the mid to high 70's during the day and you can have a 10 degree drop at night. Is this 10 degree drop needed or could it be consistently in the mid 70's?

b) I ask because with the lower end thermostats you can only set it at one temperature, you can't have a night time drop. (you could probably get past this by using a thermostat in conjunction with a timer)

2) If you use a heating pad do you put it on the bottom or on the back? I like the idea of heating from the bottom as it may help with humidity since the water is the first area to be heated up, BUT I would imagine that it is good to have a horizontal heat gradient so that the frogs could move to a cooler/warmer area if they wanted (could also be accomplished by using a small heating pad and placing it in a corner).

3) Has anyone used the exoterra pads that state they "permanently adhere" to the glass? This seems flawed?

4) Any other methods people are using? Specifically interested in view from other people with 10 gallon verts!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
107 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
I think I over complicated my post.

What are people using to heat their vivariums?

Do dart frogs need a drop in temperature overnight?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,605 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
I actually have some input on this: I put a fairly large pad on the bottom of my tank and covered it with aluminum tape which is controlled by a thermal sensor/relay. The entire bottom of the tank is filled with water (inside) so the heat transfer method is conduction. As the water heats it will evaporate and as long as your tank is fairly well sealed the water vapor will act as an insulator as well as a more efficient heat transfer media than dry air. This will increase tank humidity as well as temperature. The tank will vary somewhat with the room temp but if the humidity is high it will be more stable. Kind of like a thermal battery. The moisture contains energy and despite the high water vapor content it still would require radiative heat transfer to cool. Add to that the glass as an insulator.

I have not added a function to drop temperature but I would suggest a thermal controller plugged into a timer. Set the timer to turn the controller off at night... temp drop. You can get a timer at Home Depot for like 8 bucks.

Hope this helps. My vivarium is in a room that varies by 15 degrees. The vivarium temp using this method varies by maybe +\-2 degrees. The humidity is controlled independently and is a much more dynamic variable. RH is always 78% or higher.



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,605 Posts
I have not added a function to drop temperature but I would suggest a thermal controller plugged into a timer. Set the timer to turn the controller off at night... temp drop. You can get a timer at Home Depot for like 8 bucks.
If for some reason you wanted a night drop (or more of a night drop than you get from the lack of heat from the lighting), Vivarium Electronics VE 300 and (most of the) Herpstat thermostats have built in night drop capabilities. The Herpstats are the far better product, but both will do what we're discussing here.

https://www.reptilebasics.com/ve-300

https://www.spyderrobotics.com/index.php?main_page=index&cPath=1
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
107 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
I actually have some input on this: I put a fairly large pad on the bottom of my tank and covered it with aluminum tape which is controlled by a thermal sensor/relay. The entire bottom of the tank is filled with water (inside) so the heat transfer method is conduction. As the water heats it will evaporate and as long as your tank is fairly well sealed the water vapor will act as an insulator as well as a more efficient heat transfer media than dry air. This will increase tank humidity as well as temperature. The tank will vary somewhat with the room temp but if the humidity is high it will be more stable. Kind of like a thermal battery. The moisture contains energy and despite the high water vapor content it still would require radiative heat transfer to cool. Add to that the glass as an insulator.

I have not added a function to drop temperature but I would suggest a thermal controller plugged into a timer. Set the timer to turn the controller off at night... temp drop. You can get a timer at Home Depot for like 8 bucks.

Hope this helps. My vivarium is in a room that varies by 15 degrees. The vivarium temp using this method varies by maybe +\-2 degrees. The humidity is controlled independently and is a much more dynamic variable. RH is always 78% or higher.



Thank you, super helpful!

What heat pad and what thermostat do you use? I am a little concerned with the ones that permanently stick to the glass.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
I have a reptizoo XL pad on the bottom if I remember right. Exoterra enclosures like mine have a lifted bottom so having it permanently attached has not been an issue. That’s specifically why they designed it that way.

That thermostat looks amazing Socratic. Maybe some day I’ll invest in that.

When I said the moisture content was good for heat transfer as well as an insulator it was paradoxical. The water vapor has a fairly good specific heat capacity so once it is warmed up it stays warm. I didn’t explain that correctly. However, the idea of having high moisture content in the air in the viv to keep it stable is a straightforward concept. I was over thinking it.

Simply put, if you can maintain the humidity levels correctly then the Viv will be easier to keep stable temperature wise.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,605 Posts
That thermostat looks amazing Socratic. Maybe some day I’ll invest in that.
They are amazing -- I have four of the Herpstat 4's (and three of the VE 300x2's that I'll phase out eventually).

Just to be clear, SGT, I was directing my comment at kennyb123 or anyone else who's in the market; it sounds as if you have a setup that works well for you. It was a little misleading that I quoted you there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
They are amazing -- I have four of the Herpstat 4's (and three of the VE 300x2's that I'll phase out eventually).

Just to be clear, SGT, I was directing my comment at kennyb123 or anyone else who's in the market; it sounds as if you have a setup that works well for you. It was a little misleading that I quoted you there.


Mine does work as is but that controller looks pretty cool. I’m actually having a ton more problems with my dehumidifier setup. It’s an Inkbird that controlled a 140mm fan. Seems like the humidity sensor is all over the place. I want to get that part more stable. Any experience with inkbird controllers?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,605 Posts
Nope, but the higher-end Herpstats control humidity, too...:)

Disclaimer: ain't no humidity sensor that works in a condensing environment, I read. I just run right down the middle between 'desert' and 'where's my frog snorkel' and watch the frogs to see if the ventilation needs some fine tuning (which is: pull the plexi off the screen a little).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
107 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Mine does work as is but that controller looks pretty cool. I’m actually having a ton more problems with my dehumidifier setup. It’s an Inkbird that controlled a 140mm fan. Seems like the humidity sensor is all over the place. I want to get that part more stable. Any experience with inkbird controllers?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Do you use the Inkbird for temperature control too? If so what model and how have you liked it? I have been looking at all the different inkbird thermostats on Amazon (there are so many) but was curious what your experience has been. Is it noisy when it clicks on and off?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
Do you use the Inkbird for temperature control too? If so what model and how have you liked it? I have been looking at all the different inkbird thermostats on Amazon (there are so many) but was curious what your experience has been. Is it noisy when it clicks on and off?

The one I have did really well for about 6 months then suddenly the hydrometer went way off. The relay click is audible if you are right next to it only.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
I think using some sort of filter floss to cover the hydrometer sensor might help with the actual condensed moisture. I haven’t tried it yet. The misters make it go haywire and it’s reading low without calibration (+30rh)


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
So as I said I took a few minutes to put filter floss on the sensor. Pic below:



I mounted it back where it was but a little further away from the dehumidifier fan. I expect much slower response rate but to keep the super high humidity from condensing ok the actual sensor. It may have been damaged from so much exposure to direct moisture.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top