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Discussion Starter #1
Hello friends. In my digging on butterworts, I’ve found that many tropical species have short roots only to take in moisture and some grow on mossy rock formations. So this raises a question for me: in a vivarium setting, would I be able to mount a butterwort on the background or wood and see it grow? Theoretically, this would solve the issues that most people argue against butterworts for: it would most likely not be trampled because it’s not on the surface level, it would not die of overnutrition because it’s not in soil, and it would get a lot more light mounted higher up. One possible drawback of this idea would be drying out, but I imagine that if I mounted it on a patch of moss the water retention would be greater. So what do you all think? Has this been tried before and if so what species of butterwort would work best?
 

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Some pings are actually lithopytes, I believe cyclosecta is one of them. But even terrestrial ones are often mounted on lava rock, and should be fine mounted on a background with a little sphag, as long as it stays moist. They also don’t like water on their leaves, but I have one doing well up high in my tank where airflow is good and the leaves don’t stay wet.
 

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Some pings are actually lithopytes, I believe cyclosecta is one of them. But even terrestrial ones are often mounted on lava rock, and should be fine mounted on a background with a little sphag, as long as it stays moist. They also don’t like water on their leaves, but I have one doing well up high in my tank where airflow is good and the leaves don’t stay wet.
Thanks for the advice! would you say that pings are similar to tillandsia in terms of light requirement and ventilation?
 

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Light, yes. Ventilation - if you can keep the moisture up. I don’t believe they should ever dry out.
 

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Some are surprisingly tough, particularly the foliage produced in situ. Some of these have leaves that are constantly dripped on or even submerged. One pic is of some "mounted" in a drip wall. The others are just on bare lava rock at the waters edge. They came unidentified, but pretty sure it is P. moranensis. There is a P. gigantea in this tank too, but it's still small and not much to look at yet.

I grow these in my greenhouse too. They appear to love hard water and in the summer when I am watering heavy they start to pop up on the concrete pavers that make up the floor.
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Some are surprisingly tough, particularly the foliage produced in situ. Some of these have leaves that are constantly dripped on or even submerged. One pic is of some "mounted" in a drip wall. The others are just on bare lava rock at the waters edge. They came unidentified, but pretty sure it is P. moranensis. There is a P. gigantea in this tank too, but it's still small and not much to look at yet.

I grow these in my greenhouse too. They appear to love hard water and in the summer when I am watering heavy they start to pop up on the concrete pavers that make up the floor.
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Wow, beautiful tank you have, thanks for sharing! It’s interesting to me that they enjoy hard water as most carnies need distilled water, but I guess it makes sense considering they grow on cliffs that would naturally have high mineral content.
 
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