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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone, my name is Amanda. We don't have frogs yet, but are making lists of supplies and plan on starting a vivarium soon. We will be starting with tadpoles (we homeschool through a public school at home and they will pay for tadpoles so we can learn about the frog lifecycle). We plan on ordering our tadpoles and most of our supplies from Josh's frogs, at least what we can't find on Amazon (their school buys direct from Amazon for us). I look forward to learning more and meeting you.
 

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Welcome. :)

I would strongly recommend against starting with tads. The learning curve with frogs themselves can be steep; tads are challenging to raise even for those keepers with lots of experience so it sharply steepens the curve by starting with the most fragile, and least tolerant of shipping, part of the life cycle.

I, and others, would go so far as to say that a responsible pet breeder does not ship animals that are not fully ready to handle the rigors of shipping, and are not in the very best situation for their long term survival. A responsible animal breeder takes every possible pain to ensure that every one of the animals they ship out is both healthy and on its way to a long life, and that simply cannot be ensured with tads. Tads are sold because it is profitable to do so (because raising tads and froglets is challenging and time consuming and losses are highest at these stages), and that's the only reason. This sort of commodification is hard to justify, IMO, especially with animals that are both under environmental threat in the wild and for some are in captivity only because of illegal trafficking; we need to treat them the best we can.

I started with a couple tads after keeping other exotics and both FW and marine aquariums, and having a significant hobby reptile breeding operation, for over 20 years and killed them both. I still feel bad about the poor judgment I made.

Raising tads can be rewarding in the proper situation, such as raising the offspring of your own frogs. There's no need to miss the "full lifecycle" experience, but learning it in the most sensible order is best for the animals and the students. (Homeschool Dad here, too -- who emphasizes the bigger picture stuff :) ).
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Welcome. :)

I would strongly recommend against starting with tads. The learning curve with frogs themselves can be steep; tads are challenging to raise even for those keepers with lots of experience so it sharply steepens the curve by starting with the most fragile, and least tolerant of shipping, part of the life cycle.

I, and others, would go so far as to say that a responsible pet breeder does not ship animals that are not fully ready to handle the rigors of shipping, and are not in the very best situation for their long term survival. A responsible animal breeder takes every possible pain to ensure that every one of the animals they ship out is both healthy and on its way to a long life, and that simply cannot be ensured with tads. Tads are sold because it is profitable to do so (because raising tads and froglets is challenging and time consuming and losses are highest at these stages), and that's the only reason. This sort of commodification is hard to justify, IMO, especially with animals that are both under environmental threat in the wild and for some are in captivity only because of illegal trafficking; we need to treat them the best we can.

I started with a couple tads after keeping other exotics and both FW and marine aquariums, and having a significant hobby reptile breeding operation, for over 20 years and killed them both. I still feel bad about the poor judgment I made.

Raising tads can be rewarding in the proper situation, such as raising the offspring of your own frogs. There's no need to miss the "full lifecycle" experience, but learning it in the most sensible order is best for the animals and the students. (Homeschool Dad here, too -- who emphasizes the bigger picture stuff :) ).
Thank you, I appreciate the insight from someone who knows more about these cuties than I do. Josh's Frogs made it seem like tadpoles were easy so that's one of the reasons we were going to start with them.
 

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Sellers of all sorts of goods make a lot of things seem better than they are. When buying paper towels or peanut butter this isn't such a big deal; when buying animals I think a lot more research is necessary.

Raising tads isn't difficult, exactly -- there is just more room for a more things to go wrong than with well-established froglets, and they're harder to troubleshoot since they don't give clues of their distress until it is too late to do anything about the situation.
 
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