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They aren't imported anymore, aren't very legal, and are a manditory eggfeeder... thus making reproduction slow (like pumilio). They are out there, but because of all of this they are hard to come by. It seems you need to have something of equal value and rarity to even find out who is working with them. Also, another problem is that people don't have pairs... so you can't get young from all females or all males, thus no new ones. If you do manage to come across some be ready to pay a lot of money for them... probably will make retics and pumilio look cheap lol.
 

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We need more of these types of frogs in the hobby. Heck I just want some standard lamasi, and its about impossbile to find them.

jbeetle said:
They aren't imported anymore, aren't very legal, and are a manditory eggfeeder... thus making reproduction slow (like pumilio). They are out there, but because of all of this they are hard to come by. It seems you need to have something of equal value and rarity to even find out who is working with them. Also, another problem is that people don't have pairs... so you can't get young from all females or all males, thus no new ones. If you do manage to come across some be ready to pay a lot of money for them... probably will make retics and pumilio look cheap lol.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
i agree. it'd be great if things like quinquevittatus and sylvaticus (both on wildsky) were available. i think the quiquevittatus is one of the most beautiful around...
 

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Sorry if I came off harsh, I didn't mean to at all. I am with you guys, and I would love to see grannies and other rare frogs in the hobby. I personally would love to see D. histrionicus and D. lehmanni available as well. But like Kyle said, it is still a struggle to get Standard lamasi and there are huge waiting lists for other more common rare frogs (bastimentos pumilio, amazonicus, and even imitators and vents). There are people working with all of these, and it is a matter of time and cooperation amongst the people who have them. I know a couple people that are working with D. granuliferus and some of the other frogs I listed above... but I don't plan on getting some anytime soon. They will most likely be traded for other rare and hard to come by frogs.

Also, think about blue jeans.... there were tons, no one bred them and now there are few. There are people breeding them, but they should go to people that will be able to breed them first(same goes with some of the other frogs listed above)... or at least in my opinion. That way they have a better chance of becoming established in the hobby.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
i totally agree with the lehmani, i remember as a kid that was the first picture of a dart i saw and i was hooked. the curious thing about pumilio is how common they are in the wild, and how rare they are in the trade. i went to costa rica for a month and spent about 4 days in their habitat and saw probably hundreds. they were solid red, dotted, or had black legs. it was amazing, and they out populated the auratus 3:1 at least.
 
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Same thing is the case with terriblis gold and orange colored terriblis are very common in the wild where mints are very rare. Opposite in the hobby.
 
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