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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I really cant find much of anything on grannies. Does anybody know of a source(s) where I can get some reliable basic information on keeping and breeding grannies.
 

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I don't think they need a set up any different than pumilio. Its a similar sized obligate egg feeder, so you need to provide adequate deposition sites, and ample microfauna for emerging froglets, along with all the basic supplementation stuff. The grannie set up Ive seen looks just like every other frog tank, and gets all the same environmental parameters
I would look into the UVB lighting and solacryl lids if you have it in the budget. Other members on here working with obligate egg feeders who are providing UVB lighting even for just an hour a day seem to be getting pretty encouraging results
 

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Matching them up with a proper male is usually important...this may require a few weeks and/or months of courtship (whether or not she lives in a retirement home surrounded by various single males or is still living on her own, as well as how social/active she is, will impact the likelihood of finding a suitable male). Their level of health and physical fitness will also play a role. However, unless you figure in some pretty heavy vitamin supplementation (and are somehow able to turn the clock back a few decades), I doubt you'll be successful in the way of getting any offspring. Alas: such are the laws of nature.

Oh, wait...by "grannies" did you mean O. granulifera?
 

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Matching them up with a proper male is usually important...this may require a few weeks and/or months of courtship (whether or not she lives in a retirement home surrounded by various single males or is still living on her own, as well as how social/active she is, will impact the likelihood of finding a suitable male). Their level of health and physical fitness will also play a role. However, unless you figure in some pretty heavy vitamin supplementation (and are somehow able to turn the clock back a few decades), I doubt you'll be successful in the way of getting any offspring. Alas: such are the laws of nature.

Oh, wait...by "grannies" did you mean O. granulifera?
Funny, but gross!
 

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Matching them up with a proper male is usually important...this may require a few weeks and/or months of courtship (whether or not she lives in a retirement home surrounded by various single males or is still living on her own, as well as how social/active she is, will impact the likelihood of finding a suitable male). Their level of health and physical fitness will also play a role. However, unless you figure in some pretty heavy vitamin supplementation (and are somehow able to turn the clock back a few decades), I doubt you'll be successful in the way of getting any offspring. Alas: such are the laws of nature.

Oh, wait...by "grannies" did you mean O. granulifera?
Sounds like you speak from experience, Ron. :)

With regard to the OPs question, they are really no different than other pumilio sp. when it comes to husbandry.
 

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the grannie setups I have see pictures of were all much more of a horazontal setup versus some of the slightly more vertical setups I have seen for some of the other oophaga.
 

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Matching them up with a proper male is usually important...this may require a few weeks and/or months of courtship (whether or not she lives in a retirement home surrounded by various single males or is still living on her own, as well as how social/active she is, will impact the likelihood of finding a suitable male). Their level of health and physical fitness will also play a role. However, unless you figure in some pretty heavy vitamin supplementation (and are somehow able to turn the clock back a few decades), I doubt you'll be successful in the way of getting any offspring. Alas: such are the laws of nature.

Oh, wait...by "grannies" did you mean O. granulifera?
Shame.....LOL

They have site for that......
 

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Its actually why I'm asking. I'm considering putting my name on the wait list but there's no way I'm going to consider keeping a frog if I dont know anything about them.
At one point I considered putting my name on Rich's list for some of these as well. Just like you I wanted some info on them first. I PMd Rich with the few questions I had and he was quick to respond to me. That's where I would start.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I just had a real nice conversation with rich regarding Grannies, sorry Ron, O. Granulifera.:) Rich had a wealth of information to share and gave me his blessing to share with you so here it goes.

O. Granulifera are found in hilly terrain by fast moving streams or creeks. The terrain is rocky with not many plants. That being said in his experience he has found that a viv with low light (and he emphasized low light - to the point where nothing will grow, with the exception of pothos), and cooler temps.

They also do best on a 9 month (summer) 3 month (winter) cycle.
Summer is wetter and cooler. Winter is drier and warmer (also feed less during this period).

Rich post regularly on some other boards. There are some really nice pics and info available there. They really are great looking frogs. I would suggest checking out.

Personally, I had to pass on the grannies for the moment. I don't have any tanks that are set up for low light at the moment.

I hope this helps.
 

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I just had a real nice conversation with rich regarding Grannies, sorry Ron, O. Granulifera.:)
Thumbs up, Mike. ;)

They also do best on a 9 month (summer) 3 month (winter) cycle.
Summer is wetter and cooler. Winter is drier and warmer (also feed less during this period).
I think people miss this a lot: O. granulifera inhabits the Pacific side of Central America which experiences different weather than the Caribbean side (where you find O. pumilio). Whereas the Caribbean side has more regular rain patterns throughout the year, the Pacific side (except for maybe the Osa Peninsula) experiences a prolonged dry season.
 

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O. Granulifera are found in hilly terrain by fast moving streams or creeks. The terrain is rocky with not many plants. That being said in his experience he has found that a viv with low light (and he emphasized low light - to the point where nothing will grow, with the exception of pothos), and cooler temps.
O. granulifera ranges through a few different types of habitats. They can also be found in areas with a lot of plant growth. And while they do occur near streams, many times they are up a decent way from them. I'm sure Rich's experiences are accurate, I just wanted to add to it.
 

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I think people miss this a lot: O. granulifera inhabits the Pacific side of Central America which experiences different weather than the Caribbean side (where you find O. pumilio). Whereas the Caribbean side has more regular rain patterns throughout the year, the Pacific side (except for maybe the Osa Peninsula) experiences a prolonged dry season.
That side sees 2 wet and 2 dry seasons each year. Big and small of each.
 

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my quepos are housed in the biggest tank exo makes....has a cement stream running down all the way into a pond and one side is heavy on leaf litter and the other side of the pond I planted heavy as a self experiment to personally learn what they like. and 99.9% of the time they are on the leaf littered side all through the morning and night. eventually the male will climb up to the highest brom to call for a few hours and makes his way back down...in my experience so far, I see they really like hanging out on the open more and along the stream...if it was made easy to post pics on here I would....
 

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.if it was made easy to post pics on here I would....
It is pretty easy as you can post pictures from your computer if you resize then down into the accepted size parameters. Simply hit the reply post, and then scroll down to manage attachments. This will give you the option to post from another site or your hard drive. If you want to upload from your drive simply click on the browse button on the upload from computer and then select your picture and click open and it will upload the picture. Then simply close out the manage attachment window and hit the submit reply button and it's done.

It is way easier than you may think as I can do it...
 
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