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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
So I'm in the very early stages of of planning my terrarium, and I went to a local nursery and bought two plants:


Fittonia


bromeliad

The guy at the nursery said that the internet would be a good place to find out more about terrarium plants so here I am haha.

I'm pretty sure they are both low/medium lighting plants.

How do I prepare them for the terrarium when it's ready? I've read on the boards that some people prepare 5% bleach solutions for the plants. Do I remove all the soil from the roots and dip the whole plants in the solution? I'm also fairly certain that the nursery uses fertilizers.

Also, what kind of lighting should I use?
 

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Before planting, be sure to remove any dead growth. I would remove most of ths soil leaving some behind and plant. The waste from the frogs should be able to fertilize the plants.

Any light source that provides 6500K and above is ideal for plants. In my case, I am using flourescent lights.
 

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Okay Im gonna step in since this thread so far has givin nothing but FALSE information.

First off the Tillandsia most likely will rot as they require good airflow. the Fittonia will do fine in the terrarium and Ive not seen Fittonia leaves rot too easily.. they are pretty tuff as long as you dont let them dry out too far.

The Begonia may or may not do fine.. they are finicky and tend not to like their leaves or feet wet. In addition you have purchase an upright variety which will need to be cut back if it establishes well (Not thats a big deal but thought Id give you a heads up)

ALWAYS!!!! Bleach your plants before you add them to a viv! ALWAYS ALWAYS ALWAYS!
In addition to that ALWAYS give your plants a great rinse before and after the bleaching.
And then rinse some more. ALWAYS remove all the soil! This could contain fertilizers and other horticultural chemicals that even if not in direct contact with the frogs.. it could effect the microfauna populations.

Ill add some more to this in a few

Todd
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Ok so how do I bleach the plants then? I've read that a 5% solution should be sufficient, but how do I go about doing it? Do I completely submerge the whole plant in the solution?

Also, I've bought a fan to maintain air circulation in the viv, would that be sufficient for the Tillandsia?
 

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If you have a fan for in the viv then the Tillandsia may do okay


Step 1) remove all soils and substrates/medias
Step 2) rinse thoroughly to wash away any pesticides or other horticultural chemicals
NOTE: this does not mean they are all gone.. I do recommend a growout period as well.
Step 3) Bleach in a 5% solution for about 6 minutes making sure the plant is 100% submersed
Some people say 10 minutes but I havent had a great success rate with that long of a soak.
Step 4) Rinse well with water.
Step 5 rinse with dechlorinator solution (You can find dechlorinator at your local pet shop in the fish section)
Step 6) Rinse some more with water.. when you think youve rinsed enough.. Rinse some more.
Step 7) Pat your plants dry a bit with a paper towel
Step 8) Let your plants air dry for about 5 minutes or so.. especially Begonias.
If you do not follow steps 7 and 8 the water sitting on the leaves could cause them to rot.

Todd
 

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The "tilladansia" is actually a Cyanea bromeliad. It will do fine, but it will get huge!!
You will see purple flowers bloom starting from the bottom of the fan, working to the top. After all the flowers bloom, the pink spike will turn green. It will never turn pink again. Cut it off as close to the base as you can. A few days later, you will see one or two new plants growing out of the middle. These will each put out pink spikes and follow the blooming process. But the plant will have tripled in size.
I have several in my 300 gallon. I divide them when they spike, and spread them out so it isn't one massive cluster
 

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I think what Scott is trying to say is the Tillandsia is probably Tillandsia cyanea.
It will probably do fine.. but Ive never got to see a naturally mature adult.
That is definitely stunted.
What will happen is that particular mother plant is DONE growing.. but it will send out pups that will reach mature size if given the right conditions and not forced into bloom prematurely


Todd
 

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No. That particular plant was reclassified as a bromeliad not a tilly. The classification is because of the leaf structure of the plant. It has the appearence of a tilladansia fasciculata , but does not have the tough leaves that tillys have. And the flat fan spike that is reminisance of several other bromeliads.
Tillys are a subgenus of Bromeliad themselves
 

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Id also like to note. that Bromeliacae is the Family NOT the Genus.
Tillandsioideaeis a subfamily of Bromeliaceae
It includes Genus such as Vriesia, Tillandsia and Guzmania. amongst others for a total of 9 Genera.

I have still yet to find info of Tillandsia cyanea being reclassified. And Im under the understanding that plants are classified by their flowers and NOT by their leaf structures or EVEN the inflorescence

Todd
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Hmmm interesting.

On another note, I also have an abundance of moss in my front yard, and I was wondering if it would be possible to use in the viv. Here are some pics:





It survives the winter and snow, so I'm sure it would do well in the viv as well. Would I clean it the same way I would clean the plants?
 

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You want to make sure any species of plant or moss is tropical, anything temperate will probably not do well.

There are a couple of vendors that sell true tropical sheet mosses and a couple that occasionally have true tropical pillow moss. There is also a board member that occasionally has several different species of tropical mosses that he sells.

Just gotta poke around and keep your eyes open :)


Todd
 

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No. That particular plant was reclassified as a bromeliad not a tilly. The classification is because of the leaf structure of the plant. It has the appearence of a tilladansia fasciculata , but does not have the tough leaves that tillys have. And the flat fan spike that is reminisance of several other bromeliads.
Tillys are a subgenus of Bromeliad themselves
Hmm... I need to comment on this...

Tillies ARE bromeliads. There are a few different groups in the Bromeliaceae family like the Bromelias, Tillandsias and Pitcairnias (if I remember that right). The genus Cyanea is in the Campanulaceae family, so not even a bromeliad. I think you may be a bit confused.

Most plants are generally characterized by their reproductive parts like Todd was saying. Leaf structure is taken into account but its never the determining factor (or at least it shouldn't be due to MANY factors that affect leaf shape, color, size etc.).

According to the FCBS and IPNI, Tillandsia cyanea is still a valid name. Now according to a quick dig, Tillandsia cyanea var. tricolor is synonymous with T. lindenii. I don't know how valid that is b/c the FCBS has them still separated. Furthermore, there is a whole group of Tillandsia with fan shaped inflorescences... 'Uncle Derek Says' - Tillandsias with Paddle-shaped inflorescences
 

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Todd and Antone are right. I think Scott just made the mistake of where the divisions are made, or he just used the wrong term. Just to add a little for clarity, the bromeliad family is comprised of several subfamilies one of which is the Tillandsioideae. This subfamily contains the genus Tillandsia along with several others. Within the genus Tillandsia there are several subgenera one is called Phytarrhiza which Tillandsia cyanea belongs to. The subgenus Phytarrhiza is the group with fan-shaped inflorescenses Antone mentions. After re-reading this, I'm not positive if I clarified anything, but I thought I would try. :) To add something for the OP, I think it's not always just a matter of Tropical vs. Temperate moss, but also the genus and species. Some have very specific needs, while others are very adaptable.
 
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