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Hi,
I was searching for information about glass thickness for tank size about 20"x28"x32" tall but I didn't find it. Could you please give me advice what thickness should I use? It will be regular tank (not european style).
Would be 1/4 inch (6mm) for sides and top safe enough?
And bottom 1/3 inch (8 mm).
Do you think that it will be enough or should I use different size?
Thank you for your reply.
 

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I never understood why people want to use such thick glass in making vivariums, i have used 3/16 and it was more then thick enough.
 

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I never understood why people want to use such thick glass in making vivariums, i have used 3/16 and it was more then thick enough.
While vivariums do not need to support water so they do not need thick glass, it would still be a very bad day if you cracked or broke one. And the way I see it the bigger the glass the worse it would be. usually people put more time into bigger vivariums. I have a 40 inch x 36 inch face on one of mine and wish I had gone with 3/8 inch. Just because you never know of someone is going to whack it with a broom or throw something. I am willing to stick with 1/8 on the doors because if they break they are easy to replace.

Thicker glass just gives you a little more tolerance for errors, such as if your cheapo bakers racks are not perfectly level.
 

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You can spend a ton of money to make your shelves perfectly level and still come out ahead. 3/8" glass it more than double the cost of 1/4" glass. Also, your tank will weight 50 percent more if you use 3/8. 1/4" glass has many uses and is widely available. Thicker glass not so much.
 

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Agreed with Wes. 1/4" all around, including the bottom. I would just go with DS (approx 1/8") for the doors. I'm guessing that's what Wes uses on doors, too.
 

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Do they make double strength low iron glass? That would be nice for doors.
AFAIK double strength is just normal glass in 1/8 thickness, a marketing term to differentiate it from slightly thinner glass most places sell 2.5mm. So double strength 1/4 inch glass would basically be 3/8 inch lol

You can spend a ton of money to make your shelves perfectly level and still come out ahead. 3/8" glass it more than double the cost of 1/4" glass. Also, your tank will weight 50 percent more if you use 3/8. 1/4" glass has many uses and is widely available. Thicker glass not so much.
I wasn't telling him to do that just pointing out that even though it is more expensive the time you lose if you have a break isn't worth it. And that should be considered, in my case I wish I had opted for 3/8, and I was talking about a face of a tank not the bottom that would require the level surface.
 

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AFAIK double strength is just normal glass in 1/8 thickness, a marketing term to differentiate it from slightly thinner glass most places sell 2.5mm. So double strength 1/4 inch glass would basically be 3/8 inch lol
What?? This is confusing. Marketing terms? No, they are descriptive terms, used as standards in the industry. What do you mean by double strength 1/4" glass? That means absolutely nothing in the glass industry.
SS is Single Strength. It is approximately 1/16" thick.
DS is Double Strength. It is approximately 1/8" thick.
Beyond that, there is no triple strength, etc. Beyond that the size is simply given. There is NO double strength 1/4" glass. Making up terms just muddies the waters and makes it more confusing.
 

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I have a large tank that was custom built for someone who wanted it for a reef project. The dumb thing has 1/2" thick glass on all sides and an even thicker panel on the bottom.

It weighs several hundred pounds… An absolute nightmare to move. It looks nice, but my wife and I aren't getting any younger.

Weight is very high up on the priority scale for me.
 

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I was wondering because when I saw DS it opened up a whole new world to me lol. So I can get some 1/8" low iron doors then.
Yes, it exists. The questions would be where you could find it, and how expensive it would be. It's not something that window companies use. I have discussed it with my glass manufacturer and they do not stock it. It would only be available special order, and the minimum order put it out of my reach.

You are obviously aware of this, but I'm going to fill in the blanks for others.
Glass is not clear. Glass used in the window industry carries a very slight green tint to it. In thicker glass, or if you look at the naked edge of a piece of glass, you can see the green coloration. It's pretty easy to spot on most fish tanks and vivs if you look for it.
A low iron glass would be a clearer glass. It is used in larger, high end fish tanks to allow for a better view. Starphire is probably the best known brand.

When you are only dealing with DS glass for the doors, I'm not sure how noticeable the slight difference in clarity would be. Especially with the price you may have to pay.

I originally looked into Starphire when considering it for a viv top, to allow for UVB penetration. Unfortunately, upon looking up the stats on it, it still blocks most of the UVB.
 

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Oh, I didn't know it blocks most of the UVB. I thought UVB penetrated it well. I guess I'm not keeping up on the latest... I was going to have a door made from it so I could shine a clip on UVB bulb through that door periodically...
 

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Starphire is often recommended for UVB transmission. It does transmit a very small amount, as opposed to standard, annealed glass. I think that Todd and Sportsdoc's method of transmitting through a screen top, transmits much more UVB than glass, and is certainly much more financially feasible.
 
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