Dendroboard banner
1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Good morning,

my viv is just about stable and consistent. I’m likely going to get frogs this month. I’m going to be getting azureus tincs. Knowing they are territorial I emailed joshs frogs if they would be able to do a male and female and they said that they do not sex their frogs. Any advice on this? I don’t want to get two or three frogs and then have to sell some because they don’t get along.

should I be looking at a different species? If they are juveniles raised together are they chill? Is there a better place to get frogs from? Really trying to do this right and want the frogs to have ideal conditions.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
6,217 Posts
should I be looking at a different species?
This depends somewhat on how your viv is designed, what size it is, etc. Photos and information would help.

Guarnateed sexed or proven pairs of tincs can be found for sale, though this can take some research and patience. On that last thing, I've waited well over a year for certain animals I wanted; it isn't an unusual thing in exotics keeping. Buying from someone other than a huge pet mart style etailer might give you the option to get two frogs that are a probable pair (i.e. visually sexed; not 100% reliable, but it is something).

Raising up a group and sexing them out to find a compatible pair is pretty typical. A suitable viv for a pair has enough space to grow out a small (4 or so) group, and temporary holding vivs aren't hard to set up.
 
  • Like
Reactions: JasonE

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,243 Posts
I recommend you look for individual hobbyists to buy from. For azureus, it probably won't be too hard to find a proven or sexed pair.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
403 Posts
You just missed it, someone was selling a pair on here not too long ago.

I got a sexed pair in February and it was a good purchase. These frogs are incredibly bold and fun to watch, they are already breeding and I have 5 tadpoles developing now.

Ricky
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
This depends somewhat on how your viv is designed, what size it is, etc. Photos and information would help.

Guarnateed sexed or proven pairs of tincs can be found for sale, though this can take some research and patience. On that last thing, I've waited well over a year for certain animals I wanted; it isn't an unusual thing in exotics keeping. Buying from someone other than a huge pet mart style etailer might give you the option to get two frogs that are a probable pair (i.e. visually sexed; not 100% reliable, but it is something).

Raising up a group and sexing them out to find a compatible pair is pretty typical. A suitable viv for a pair has enough space to grow out a small (4 or so) group, and temporary holding vivs aren't hard to set up.
I have a 24x18x18 exo terra. Running 1 LED light currently and a misting system that goes for 1 min once a day with three of the four screen panels covered with glass to retain humidity. I designed it so there are two areas accessible for the frogs to gain access to an elevated positions and there are three locations where the frogs can hide. I have a water feature which is shallow, roughly 1 inch. I planted isopod and springtail cultures a few weeks ago. The springtails are thriving and I haven’t seen the isopods. I have cherry shrimp and a snail to control algae blooms. The stupid exo terra heat and humidity gauge doesn’t work but based on the plants it would appear that the conditions are fine. I keep my apartment at 69 degrees and the condensation/moisture suggests good humidity. If you guys have accurate ways to measure the environmental conditions that would be great because I don’t know what to purchase at this point.
Plant Plant community Flower Terrestrial plant Organism
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I have a 24x18x18 exo terra. Running 1 LED light currently and a misting system that goes for 1 min once a day with three of the four screen panels covered with glass to retain humidity. I designed it so there are two areas accessible for the frogs to gain access to an elevated positions and there are three locations where the frogs can hide. I have a water feature which is shallow, roughly 1 inch. I planted isopod and springtail cultures a few weeks ago. The springtails are thriving and I haven’t seen the isopods. I have cherry shrimp and a snail to control algae blooms. The stupid exo terra heat and humidity gauge doesn’t work but based on the plants it would appear that the conditions are fine. I keep my apartment at 69 degrees and the condensation/moisture suggests good humidity. If you guys have accurate ways to measure the environmental conditions that would be great because I don’t know what to purchase at this point. View attachment 307509
also, there are dozens of super small white microorganisms that appeared in the water. I’m really hoping they aren’t baby shrimp. They tend to hug the glass and water surface. When they move they wriggle. I read about daphnia and I am also hoping that isn’t the case.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
403 Posts
Looks awesome, but this is not an environment suitable for dart frogs. It will likely lead to infection and ultimately death if there are not significant changes made to the enclosure.

If you are willing to make the necessary changes it will require scrapping the water feature and body of water and going for a much dryer environment that retains high humidity. Also tons of leaf litter on the ground which would cover that moss.

Otherwise I would recommend another species, perhaps a fire belly toad.

Those creatures in the water may be springtails if you take a photo we may be able to identify.

Ricky
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Looks awesome, but this is not an environment suitable for dart frogs. It will likely lead to infection and ultimately death if there are not significant changes made to the enclosure.

If you are willing to make the necessary changes it will require scrapping the water feature and body of water and going for a much dryer environment that retains high humidity. Also tons of leaf litter on the ground which would cover that moss.

Otherwise I would recommend another species, perhaps a fire belly toad.

Those creatures in the water may be springtails if you take a photo we may be able to identify.

Ricky
could you elaborate on the litter vs moss and water vs no water? I’ve read both and at this point it’s just confusing without further explanation.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
could you elaborate on the litter vs moss and water vs no water? I’ve read both and at this point it’s just confusing without further explanation.
Planned on adding the litter over the moss though. I deliberately designed the water feature very shallow with multiple points to climb out. The infection statement is concerning though.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
4,067 Posts
As @Imatreewaterme identified, this setup is not what we recommend for dart frogs.

Here a great guide to creating a dart frog vivarium:

Vivarium 101

Terrestrially grown moss and water features are, in VERY many cases, just a waste of floorspace that the frogs could be using. Frogs will use leaf litter extensively to live on top of, inside, and forage through for leftover fruit flies.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
6,217 Posts
The stupid exo terra heat and humidity gauge doesn’t work but based on the plants it would appear that the conditions are fine. I keep my apartment at 69 degrees and the condensation/moisture suggests good humidity. If you guys have accurate ways to measure the environmental conditions that would be great because I don’t know what to purchase at this point
Yes, search 'humidity' here and organize the results by date. (Spoiler: don't purchase anything.)

A couple general comments:

Leaf litter over all that moss will be rotten leaf litter pretty quickly, especially with the nearly inevitable saturation issues caused by water "features". It would be worth a redesign, I think. I'm in the process of setting up a viv to replace one I made with a water area -- a few hundred dollars (a new Amazonia, a complicated shelf to put it on, and ghostwood is expensive) and a lot of hours of work.

Backgrounds sometimes look different in photos than in person, but if the background is as mostly vertical as it looks, tincs aren't going to get too much use out of it -- they're more walkers than climbers (though they walk high). Here is one landscaping design that is turning out to work pretty well for tinc 'Bakhius' (a quite small locale).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I love the way your set up looks. I’m a sucker for a nicely designed paludarium. I say keep it and find something that would appreciate it.
Any ideas? The water feature really isn’t significant in size or depth so I don’t think it would be adequate for normal frogs either. Not tall enough for tree frogs probably etc
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
389 Posts
Any ideas? The water feature really isn’t significant in size or depth so I don’t think it would be adequate for normal frogs either. Not tall enough for tree frogs probably etc
Do some more research and find a species that you’d find interesting to house. Then make some design edits to your enclosure to best suit the needs of your selected animal of choice. In the meantime, you can enjoy how cool the enclosure looks and learn how to properly manage it (humidity, lighting, water quality, horticulture).
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
860 Posts
I think that has potential for vampire crabs. They'd like a few more hiding spaces and would also benefit from leaf litter, but that species would be a better fit in this setup than any dart frogs.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top