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Can fruit flies successfully reproduce in a viv?

Long stupid scenario but:
I first noticed my sips getting less excited at feeding time. First I was worried about decreased appetite and thriving but then I realized there was still a ton of undusted FF by my banana slice. Watching more carefully I noticed they continually hunt but aren't ever hungry enough to go wild at feeding time. When I moved the banana I noticed multiple larva/pupa staged individuals just above the substrate. Anyways they aren't booming like actual cultures but I worry that my sips will get fewer supplements if they continue to proliferate.

Has anyone encountered this scenario?
Does anyone have creative ways to dust flies already in the viv?

Cheers in Advance
 

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I don't use the feeding station method, but I'm under the impression that the point of it is to keep the FFs in one place so that you don't add more until the FFs have all been eaten. Probably feeding less and/or less frequently would be the best solution.
 

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When I use banana slices for a feeding station, I don't leave the banana slice in long enough where the maggots would be developed far enough along to pupate.

I would do as Socratic suggested. Feed less volume, feed less frequently, and observe how your frogs react to it.
 

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I remember reading a thread where someone was toying around with the idea of adding a mini compost bin to a tank. I assumed this was to help gut load the springtails/fruit flies. Not sure whatever happened with it
 

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I remember reading a thread where someone was toying around with the idea of adding a mini compost bin to a tank. I assumed this was to help gut load the springtails/fruit flies. Not sure whatever happened with it
It produced too much moisture and had to be broken down...

It wasn't to gut load the invertebrates but to act as a refugia, which would supplement feeding the frogs. Practically speaking pretty much all of the frogs in the hobby are obese to morbidly obese so there really isn't a need to maximize the production of infauna since it encourages the frogs to ignore the vitamin dusted feeders which are needed to ensure proper nutrition.

some comments

Ed
 
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