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How have you lost a froglet?

  • Trauma (heat spike, desication, drowning etc)

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Wasting away (won't/cant eat parasites weight loss)

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • none of the above

    Votes: 0 0.0%
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This seems a rather unpleasant topic , and it seems a lot of people are relunctant to talk about (no one wants a bad rep, either as a breeder or even just a keeper). Still I'm really curious as to how many froglets live pas their there first year. I'm no biologist, but I always thought that the percentage was relative to how many offspring are produced a season (or just through out the life of a fertile couple). Frogs seem to produce a fair amount when compared to "higher order" animals (but not quite as many as some insects or "lower order" animals) in general.

In the past year or so of keeping I've lost several frogs, I like to think I've followed most if not all the advice I've gotten from frognet/here/breeders/other websites fairly well. I've always had enough food etc.

I'm curious to hear others experiences do most keepers lose no frogs? 5%? 10%? 35%? and how? I've come up with a few basic distinctions for froglets dying:

1. escape/desication/drowning/temp spikes basically some sort of trauma. 2. wasting away (parasite? vitamin deficiency? other?)
and lastly maybe most frustrating...
3. apearently healthy looking frog just keels over w/o indication of any sort of "trauma"

I personally have lost a frog(or even two) in each manner and am curious how other people have fared. I know this is unpleasant but I'd really like to know how other people's experiences compare to mine.

-Tad
 

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1,411 Posts
Tad,

How about accidents?

When I worked in the laboratory i used to have a helper that came down to lend me a hand a few hours a week with the collection. Unfortunately, he closed the lid to one of the terrariums without paying attention. He closed it on the head of a female blue jeans....ouch! :(

Justin
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'd qualify that as "trauma" at least how I broke it down, an escape or even what you just described (which I've heard of more than one person doing).


-Tad
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Hrm wish I could change the poll.... to add "none of the above, all of the above, and more than one of the above." or that people could "vote" more than once =/


-Tad
 

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This is a rather unpleasant topic, however it has happened to most of us I am sure. I unfortunately just lost a gravid female mantella aurantiaca, and a 3 month old hawaiian auratus. Anyway, from what I have been taught, the more babies an animal produces, the higher the mortality rate. Frogs seem to produce quite a bit of offspring, so, in the wild I am sure there is a very high mortality rate. THey have to fight off predators, compete with each other for food, and withstand the elements. However, this is not the case in captivity, depending on how you raise them. I think the best way to raise froglets is 1 to 2 per container. THis is how I am raising some recently acquired aurantiaca froglets. So far, they have all been healthy, and eating well. So, if you eliminate the competition (other froglets and parents), the elements, and predators, you should have a very low mortality rate. I know a lot of people don't have the time or space to keep froglets in individual containers, and I would have to say that this is probably one of the main reasons for death by stress. ANyway, I won't get any further into it. It is a horrible thing to have happen though. But perhaps if you are losing a lot of froglets, remember those three key points. Competition, predators, and the elements. COmpetition being the most common in captivity. Good luck with future froglets, soon I am getting some vent froglets, hopefully.

Ed
 
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