Dendroboard banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
281 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So my 4 R. Uakarii have been co-habitating pretty well. I suspect it's a 2.2 group, but it could also be a 1.3 group. There's a dominate mating pair, and the other two are somewhat less bold as a result. All have been very plump and will actively feed in the substrate together, mostly indifferent to each other.

However, over the last few weeks, I've noticed the dominant female chasing the other female around a bit more often, and last week, for the first time, I saw them wrestling.

This past week I haven't seen the other female at all, which is unusual. I did some moderate searching, but couldn't find her and I'm starting to fear the worst. Since I can't find her, I decided instead to remove the dominant female in hopes that maybe the lack of pressure will coax her out. I'm thinking of putting her in a temporary enclosure for at least a few days, maybe for a week, effectively a froggy timeout.

I do fear the worst though. The missing female was quite plump when I last saw her only 7 days ago, so I'd be surprised if she was starved out so quickly, but it's not impossible that the other female drowned her somewhere that I haven't found...

What measures do you guys take in these sorts of situations?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
281 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'm housing the dominate female in a plastic shoe box with some moist paper towels, leaf littler and some cuttings. I thought I saw the other female make a brief appearance a few hours after I removed the dominate one, but I can't be sure -- I'll give it a few days.

The other factor in this is that I'm no longer working from home, so I just don't see my frogs nearly as often, and it's hard to tell if someone is MIA, or just active when I'm not around.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
281 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Well, my fears were confirmed today. After several days with the dominant female removed, and still not seeing the other female, I went and did a thorough search. I'm 98% sure I found the remains of the other female in the center of a brom pup. From the looks of what was left, and the timing from when I last saw her, I suspect this occurred shortly after I saw them wrestling. I'm guessing the dominant female drowned her by sitting on top of her while she either went into the brom to sleep, or just happened to be there at the wrong time.

Maybe not surprising, but this all occurred after the sub-dominant female laid a clutch of (infertile) eggs, which she had never done before. She might have been actively competing for the courting male.

In any case, my advice to R. Uakarii keepers is to keep only in male dominant groups, and separate females at the FIRST sign of fighting. Alternatively -- if you must keep fighting females together, and everyone is otherwise healthy, keep broms out of the enclosure, as well as other small features that can collect water.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Sorry to hear that :( you did the right thing trying to split them up, shame it was too late. I hope the rest of them get on now
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
728 Posts
The general consensus is that they work well in male dominated groups, but have trouble with groups with higher ratios of females. I guess you have proven that point again!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
281 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
It's too bad as I had an opportunity to intervene, and I instead decided to wait and see how things played out. Lesson learned.

The good news though is that the dominant pair has been very prolific with their tadpole production operation, and my first froglets morphed out this week.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
728 Posts
It's too bad as I had an opportunity to intervene, and I instead decided to wait and see how things played out. Lesson learned.

The good news though is that the dominant pair has been very prolific with their tadpole production operation, and my first froglets morphed out this week.
How large was the tank? I think you had a thread on it.

I've had to remove some nasty females from my imitator groups before, but for the most part if there are enough hiding places they don't kill each other in such a direct manner.

If you start to see frogs go from visible to non-visible, that is an instant clue to intervene right away. Active wrestling isn't reason enough to have to separate, but I would suggest for those new to keeping Ranitomeya that would be a good point at which to intervene.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
281 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
How large was the tank? I think you had a thread on it.

I've had to remove some nasty females from my imitator groups before, but for the most part if there are enough hiding places they don't kill each other in such a direct manner.

If you start to see frogs go from visible to non-visible, that is an instant clue to intervene right away. Active wrestling isn't reason enough to have to separate, but I would suggest for those new to keeping Ranitomeya that would be a good point at which to intervene.
Yeah that's a good point. It's 37 gallons with plenty of hiding spaces (but clearly not enough!). I don't think I'd be comfortable with a group with multiple females in the future in anything smaller than 50-60 gallons.

It's hard to say if things escalated quickly, or if she just was unlucky to find herself in a compromising position when the other female was being territorial. It's probably the former though.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top