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Hi, Frank Indiviglio here. I’m a herpetologist, zoologist, and book author, recently retired from a career spent at several zoos, aquariums, and museums, including over 20 years with the Bronx Zoo.
An Australian frog that copes with droughts by entering a hibernation-like state known as aestivation is now the focus of important bio-medical research. Despite being immobile for months at a time, the Striped Burrowing Frog (Cyclorana alboguttata) suffers little of the muscle loss seen in immobile people, and in astronauts who spend long periods at reduced gravity. Two related frog species that I was lucky enough to acquire many years ago were also able to weather months without water, and in many ways seemed to be the ecological equivalent of another favorite of mine, the African Bullfrog. Read the rest of this article here Frog Research May Help Humans Avoid Muscle Loss | That Reptile Blog
Please also check out my posts on Twitter http://bitly.com/JP27Nj and Facebook http://on.fb.me/KckP1m

My Bio, with photos of animals I’ve been lucky enough to work with: That Pet Place Welcomes Frank Indiviglio | That Reptile Blog

Best Regards, Frank
 

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Thank you, Frank. I wonder if that may lead to a breakthrough for people, like me, with Charcot Marie-Tooth Disease, a neuromuscular disorder that also causes muscle wasting. I've lost nearly 25% of my calf muscle mass in the last 3 years, as measured by my Neurologist. This, despite constant workouts of my legs to help combat it.
 

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Thank you, Frank. I wonder if that may lead to a breakthrough for people, like me, with Charcot Marie-Tooth Disease, a neuromuscular disorder that also causes muscle wasting. I've lost nearly 25% of my calf muscle mass in the last 3 years, as measured by my Neurologist. This, despite constant workouts of my legs to help combat it.

Thank you, and I hope you are able to overcome the disease. Your Thoreau quote is one of my favorites, best Frank
 

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Unfortunately It isn't curable and is degenerative by nature. In fact, it is referred to as an "Orphan disease". Because it is such a rare disease it is not profitable enough for the pharmaceutical companies to do research and development. All we can do is (not too effectively) treat symptoms. It's pretty weird to see, actually. The more I relax my legs, the more it looks like bugs are crawling under my lower leg skin. It is, in fact, micro spasms. Still cool, IMO, nonetheless! On the bright side I have thighs like Oak tree trunks since they must make up for the slacking calf muscles. Thank you for the reply, Frank!


EDIT: Sorry to derail your thread! I was excited at the news and wanted to share!
 
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