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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi guys I had got this 4months old yellow bumble bee froglet and he was healthy feeding and fat ..in the morning I was feeding it and it was still fine but when I check the tank again hours later I found that he wasn't able to move it back legs ?? What is the problem? Over feeding ??
 

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I think a pic of both the frog and the viv are needed if anyone is going to be able to help you. I had a similar problem recently... Best of luck!

JBear
 

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There are a number of potential causes of this sort of symptom.

Asking what supplements the person is using with no other information lacks context and is useless.

When asking questions about husbandry I wish people would ask the following questions (or have them posted already so they don't have to be asked)

1) how long has the person had the frog

2) what were the highest temperature during the day in that enclosure

3) was the frog handled or moved

4) other animals in the enclosure

5) any odd behaviors


As an example... just asking what supplements the person used without the above information does absolutely nothing to rule out problems with supplements as that person could have recently aquired that frog and it could have issues with deficiencies before they got it.
 

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I would appreciate some answers too. I had a girl leuc that this happened to but it was her front left leg. After a few days of not eating and dragging herself if I tried to get her to move, I put her down. :( I couldn't bare watching her suffer.

If it helps I can answer Ed's questions to see if there is any relation:

1) how long has the person had the frog = 10 Months

2) what were the highest temperature during the day in that enclosure = 79F

3) was the frog handled or moved = Yes, it was separated with a male from another pair. From a 75G to a 10G just 2 weeks ago. But she had been moved in January from a 20G to the 75G and did just fine. Of course she wasn't separated from any other frogs. She was moved with the two males she had been with for approx 3 years. All of a sudden, I move her with only one male and she gets depressed. Burrows all day in the dirt where she can find it. She digger up the moss to get in the dirt and would sit in it. I finally moved her back to the 75G and she still would just hide and not come out to eat. That's when I noticed her leg stop functioning. Two days later I took her out and put her into quarantine where she would not eat and drag herself around on her side. It was very sad. I put her down after two days of quarantine and starting her on Baytril. Total days, probably a week and a half to two weeks of when I first moved her.

4) other animals in the enclosure - A male she has lived with for 3 years.

5) any odd behaviors - Depression
 

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There are a number of potential causes of this sort of symptom.

Asking what supplements the person is using with no other information lacks context and is useless.

When asking questions about husbandry I wish people would ask the following questions (or have them posted already so they don't have to be asked)

1) how long has the person had the frog

2) what were the highest temperature during the day in that enclosure

3) was the frog handled or moved

4) other animals in the enclosure

5) any odd behaviors


As an example... just asking what supplements the person used without the above information does absolutely nothing to rule out problems with supplements as that person could have recently aquired that frog and it could have issues with deficiencies before they got it.
To be fair Ed, a response of "What are supplements??" or "Some stuff I got 4 years ago in a white bottle" could give some insight - but agreed, more information is needed in most cases.
 

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To be fair Ed, a response of "What are supplements??" or "Some stuff I got 4 years ago in a white bottle" could give some insight - but agreed, more information is needed in most cases.
Hi Jeremey,

Yes but those answers in and of themselves would provide context but just asking what supplements without the other information lacks context.. a presumptive diagnosis was made even before the information on the supplements came back...

Ed
 

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If it helps I can answer Ed's questions to see if there is any relation:

1) how long has the person had the frog = 10 Months

2) what were the highest temperature during the day in that enclosure = 79F

3) was the frog handled or moved = Yes, it was separated with a male from another pair. From a 75G to a 10G just 2 weeks ago. But she had been moved in January from a 20G to the 75G and did just fine. Of course she wasn't separated from any other frogs. She was moved with the two males she had been with for approx 3 years. All of a sudden, I move her with only one male and she gets depressed. Burrows all day in the dirt where she can find it. She digger up the moss to get in the dirt and would sit in it. I finally moved her back to the 75G and she still would just hide and not come out to eat. That's when I noticed her leg stop functioning. Two days later I took her out and put her into quarantine where she would not eat and drag herself around on her side. .

4) other animals in the enclosure - A male she has lived with for 3 years.

5) any odd behaviors - Depression
First off, in this case, depression not really descriptive.. Anorexic is a better case.

Did you get her x-rayed to rule out a dislocation?
 

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I appologize for my assumptions and bad questions I guess they were useless, in my keeping of darts for the past 10 years the most common problem that I've seen is vitamin defeciency and I haven't had many problems with my frogs thankfully, so I guess my identification of medical problems is lacking at best
And this post is helpful how?
 

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The reason people shouldn't immediately leap to "supplements" as the diagnosis in cases like this is because (and this is not an all inclusive list),

1) the symptoms could be due to trauma

2) the symptoms could be due to impaction and pressure on the nerves that pass through the pelvic region

3) the symptoms could be caused by a parasitic or other infection

4) thermal stress can cause this sort of symptoms

if there is a problem with the supplements and it is severe enough to cause an inability to use the hind limbs, then deformation is commonly seen in other areas of the body, and the frog should have exhibited a rigid paralysis with tremoring or spasming of the muscles (although this can also occur with thermal stress). Without contextual information, you might as well just say it was because Mars was in conjunction with Jupiter...
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
There are a number of potential causes of this sort of symptom.

Asking what supplements the person is using with no other information lacks context and is useless.

When asking questions about husbandry I wish people would ask the following questions (or have them posted already so they don't have to be asked)

1) how long has the person had the frog (this frog is close to 5mths ,morph out from tadpole,I had a total of 70pcs of them but this is the first case )

2) what were the highest temperature during the day in that enclosure (29 degree C)

3) was the frog handled or moved (No)

4) other animals in the enclosure (No, all are bumble bee about 10 of them in a tank 30x45x60cm with dry moss changed Weekly.)

5) any odd behaviors( it was normal and feeding before the hind legs was dead)


Thanks ED , hope this might help.


As an example... just asking what supplements the person used without the above information does absolutely nothing to rule out problems with supplements as that person could have recently aquired that frog and it could have issues with deficiencies before they got it.
Thanks ED , hope this might help.
 

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First off, in this case, depression not really descriptive.. Anorexic is a better case.

Did you get her x-rayed to rule out a dislocation?
Depression I describe as sitting in one spot, burrowed in dirt, and not wanting to move unless forced to move. She sat like this for 3 days. If fed, she would let the ff crawl over her, but she would not eat. It started the day I moved her out of her 75g and her old buddy pal she was so used to living with so I assume, depression. But maybe I'm thinking too much like a human.

I made sure the conditions in the tank were adequate. Humidity high, temp right. Then the limping started after that.

No, I did not have her x-rayed. :(d
 

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Does acute bilateral dislocation occur commonly in frogs?
There are two different cases here, the original poster is referring to a problem with the hind legs, there was a hijack where one of the front legs, became unusable.

It was the front leg case, that I asked if they had it x-rayed to see if it was dislocated or broken. Reports of similar injuries are not rare and have occured with observations of a leg being trapped in plant or structural materials in the enclosures.

Bilateral dislocation is fairly uncommon but I have seen incorrect (over zealous) capturing/recapturing cause this in small anurans.

Ed
 

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Depression I describe as sitting in one spot, burrowed in dirt, and not wanting to move unless forced to move. She sat like this for 3 days. If fed, she would let the ff crawl over her, but she would not eat. It started the day I moved her out of her 75g and her old buddy pal she was so used to living with so I assume, depression. But maybe I'm thinking too much like a human.

I made sure the conditions in the tank were adequate. Humidity high, temp right. Then the limping started after that.

No, I did not have her x-rayed. :(d
Dendrobatids do not form attachments to mates, like that seen in some other taxa (some primates as an example) so the seperation from one frog or the other is not the cause.
 

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Thanks ED , hope this might help.
The data you provided makes it very unlikely to be an issue with supplements (and illustrates why context is important). If the frog is still feeding well, I would suggest consulting with a vet on it (and you may want to confirm that it is passing fecals). You can check on the fecals by feeding the frogs, and then once it is finished eating moving it to a plastic shoe box lined with damp paper towels.

Ed
 

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There are two different cases here, the original poster is referring to a problem with the hind legs, there was a hijack where one of the front legs, became unusable.

It was the front leg case, that I asked if they had it x-rayed to see if it was dislocated or broken. Reports of similar injuries are not rare and have occured with observations of a leg being trapped in plant or structural materials in the enclosures.

Bilateral dislocation is fairly uncommon but I have seen incorrect (over zealous) capturing/recapturing cause this in small anurans.

Ed
Thank you Ed, I missed it was someone else that had replied, my fault there. It definitely makes sense for the single leg. Poor handling makes sense for bilateral dislocation as well, thank you.
 
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