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If a fogger is used to keep up constant humidity (not in replacement of misting) is adding a glass lid to the top of an exo terra really necessary ?
A fogger is purely for aesthetics, it really should not be run constantly as there is some anecdotal evidence its bad for the frogs. Frogs breathe partially through their skin and when tanks fill up with fog its very common to see frogs climb to the highest parts in the viv trying to get out of the fog.

A partial glass lid that covers up about 60-90% of the top is pretty much essential. Then use smaller pieces of glass/plastic to cover up some of the remaining screen. This is how you dial in your humidity level. Remove some of the smaller pieces to make it less humid, put down more to make it more humid.

Also if you leave a fogger running all the time you will make it must easier to see the frogs. Hard to spot them when more then half the viv is invisible behind a layer of fog.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I currently have it running on my tinctorius and they are always out and about hunting through the fog (I turn it down if I want visibility) . Was considering doing it with my thumbnail enclosure but now not so sure..
 

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A partial glass lid that covers up about 60-90% of the top is pretty much essential. Then use smaller pieces of glass/plastic to cover up some of the remaining screen. ... Remove some of the smaller pieces to make it less humid, put down more to make it more humid.
@OP - This is exactly what you need to do.

Was considering doing it with my thumbnail enclosure but now not so sure..
There's no need for uncertainty. Don't do it - it's a waste of time, money, and effort. Actually, it's worse than just a waste. It's a bad idea.

good luck, have fun!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
@OP - This is exactly what you need to do.



There's no need for uncertainty. Don't do it - it's a waste of time, money, and effort. Actually, it's worse than just a waste. It's a bad idea.

good luck, have fun!
Ya ya I get that but can you explain why it is a bad idea (besides for the waste of money etc)
 

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Ya ya I get that but can you explain why it is a bad idea (besides for the waste of money etc)
I think the general consensus is that it does not benefit the animals, only the "look and feel" of the tank from our perspective. Coupled with anecdotal evidence to suggest it may potentially be harmful for the frogs, it becomes something that you should probably avoid. It's like adding a skull decoration to a vivarium. If the skull was proven to be safe to use - no problem. If there was a possibility it might harm the animals, why put it in?

Hope that makes sense.
 

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Dart frogs thermoregulate by evaporating water from their skin. If the frogs' skin is saturated with water, they cannot control the rate of evaporation. If the air is saturated, the frogs cannot control the rate of evaporation.

Frogs that aren't given options of moister and drier (and more and less humid) microhabitats cannot tell the keeper -- by where they hang out -- whether the moisture levels in the viv are optimal. This makes the keeper's job (i.e. keeping the frogs from dying from unsuitable environmental parameters) much harder, because that feedback -- the frogs telling us what they need -- doesn't exist. That makes a fogger a bad idea -- every process, method, gadget, or toy that makes husbandry harder is bad, from a husbandry point of view.

Frogs kept too wet have an increased risk of bacterial and fungal skin infections (which can and do lead to systemic infections). Plants kept too wet have an increased risk of bacterial and fungal diseases.

Substrates kept too wet -- from any reason, not just suspended liquid water droplets constantly falling on it, which is what a fogger provides -- degrade more rapidly. Overly saturated substrates cause leaf litter -- which frogs need for hiding and foraging -- to break down more quickly. Overly saturated substrates can affect microfauna production negatively.

Also, there is not one benefit to the frogs.
 
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