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Discussion Starter #1
My plan for a background was to use insulation foam and coconut fiber mats (the ones used for hanging flower baskets). My reasoning is as follows:
-the background could be easily removable, I didn't want the coco mats glued to the walls
-I figure coco mats would be good to help keep moisture
-On the foam I would glue some wood and great stuff in areas to give it a 3D look rather than all flat

Do I need to seal the foam with epoxy, what is the purpose of this? Does this sound like a way to go? Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
So I can change the tank later on if I want to. Also so I can work on the background outside of the tank, then just slide it in.
 

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Backgrounds

I have used this method and it works fine it has many up positives and no negatives. I use the 1 inch foam create a shape I think will look good with wire mesh coat the wire with a non-toxic resin that I have let it dry seal the unfinished areas (where the resin was not used) with silicone and cover it with ground peat or coco fiber let it dry 24 hours and use a little silicone to adhere to the back of the tank. If you don't like the way it turns out don't put it in the tank, when you break down the tank you can pop it out with little effort and throw it out. I think they cost me about $4.00 to make not counting my time. I am thinking about making one for one of my larger tanks that will be entirely coated with the resin so it can be easily cleaned and re-used.

Scott
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Does it matter what kind of foam you use? I went to home depot and they had a couple different kinds of insulation foam. There was the pink stuff then a white one with a shiny blue side to it.
 

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background with concrete primer

I'm looking to salvage a tank that is a week or so into the making. Here's my delima:

I made a Great Stuff background and covered it with a bark/coco fiber mixed with Ace Concrete primer/Bonding Adhesive. The background dried hard and looks great. However, there will be a water feature in this tank. The waterfall will be going down a piece of cork bark, so long term term water exposure is ok. However, I'm concerned about the concrete primer dissolving from the high moisture over time.

Now I'm looking to bail myself out, without having to scrap and redo the tank.
Any ideas on something I can coat the whole background to seal and protect it? Please let me know.
Thanks
John
 

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I had built a 24x36 tall viv. with half inch ply boards for the back and bottom. First I textured with colored grout let that dry. Then I used epoxy resin. And to run the test, I had placed a waterfall and let that run for 3 day. It created alot of humidity, thing is the moisture pentrated through my clear epoxy coat and bubbled and made hugh cracks. So I stopped the water feature and let it dry for day. I ended up peeling off the top coat. So I thought using silcone on the surface would be a better idea. I used my gloved finger to smear it on, a thin coat of it. When it dried it looked transparent which I wanted. And ran the test again with the waterfall but this time I had it running for a week. That made it totally waterproof. I was satisfied with results. So my blue auratus finally have a new home. The draw back of my idea for the backing was that it made the viv so heavy it took 2 people to move it. That I didn't like. It was awesome looking. I ended up tearing it down early this year. It was just to big. My next one will be a 14x30 instead.
 
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