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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Okay. I've got 3 empty tanks. I'm planning a false bottom, small stream going to a shallow water feature, foam sealant background viv. I started out thinking I would set this up in a 24L x 12W x 12H tank. Then, I thought, why not go with my 24L x 12W x 16H tank? (just a bit taller for plantings after the false bottom and substrate take up their space).

Now, I'm REALLY thinking of using the 48L x 18W x 20H tank that I have available. I'll have much more room for false bottom, substrate landscaping, plants, and the scaping of the foam background w/plants and wood. My plan, for inhabitants, are Phyllobates Terribilis. I'd like to get a small group of 4, maybe 5 frogs to help insure I will have males and females.

Is this too large of a tank to start off with? I've read a bit that a smaller size tank is "better" as far as ensuring that the frogs are able to hunt/find their food successfully. Am I thinking too big...? Or would this be a good size home for these little gems. What are the pros/cons and opinions?

One other quick question. For under the false bottom, are most people using a submersible tank heater to help insure adequate heat? Room temperature in my home is usually around 72 to 74 in the warm months (central air conditioned). I keep my home thermostat set at 68 in the winter/cold months (I live in NW Ohio). With lights, moist substrate, high humidity in the viv, would I have a problem with the nighttime viv temp dipping too low in the night, if not using a heater? Also, what insurances have, those keeping darts in colder climates, been taken to guard against power outages. Power backups, etc? Sorry so long... thanks!
 
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
lots of questions there :D

First, dont let anyone tell you to start small, just be smart about it and thorough in your planning and you will love it. 48x24x20 is a 40ish gallon tank right? thats a good size for a group of 4 terri, but they are fairly large, so you might even want to go with 3.

Second, the reason that people say to start small is to ensure that your frogs are eating well and have no problems. You should keep them for at least a few months, possibly up to 6 in a smaller container where you can watch them closely and they can find food easy enough. i would set up a 10 or 20 gallon with a very simple setup to keep them in untill they outgrow it and then move them over to the big tank. This will give the frogs time to grow and eat right and give the tank some time to grow in and establish itself before getting trampled by frogs.

Third, when setting up a tank that big, be very VERY attentive to details. Make sure there are no spots that the frogs can get stuck in or escape from. Little frogs can squeeze out of and into places that you wouldn't imagine, and a lot of times they get themselves stuck and cant get out. With a large tank you have to be extra careful because with all that room, you might not see all of them all the time.

Fourth, heating. sounds like your house is about the right temp for keeping darts without any extra heating. Keep in mind that your lights are going to give about 5-10 more degrees (maybe more depending on what kind of light you use). During the night when the lights are off in the winter, you might want something small to keep the temp closer to 70, and there are tons of ways to do that. there are under-tank heating pads, submersible heaters, wire heaters, and so on. Personally i found that the easiest thing for me is to run a small space heater in the frog room at a low setting at night when the lights are off. (plus if it blows out, i dont have to take the tanks apart to replace it) as far as backup heat, i dont think you need to worry too much about it, if for some reason the power goes out, the tanks will maintain their temp for a good while because of the amount of standing water under your false bottom that is the same temp as the rest of the tank.

Good luck!
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
If its your first frogs, I really recommend setting up a temp home that is attractive, 5.5 gallon or ten gallon (provided they're froglets). Go the whole ten yards, plant it make a false bottom put whatever water feature you want into it, but know that you are going to tear it down. Its good practice, for making a larger viv, and while your frogs are growin in their temp home you have time to figure out what you want to do in their permanent home (and you can let the plants in their grow out). Besides your going to want to watch them and enjoy them, putting them in a "shoe box" is counter to this.
Its really easy for someone who has raised up plenty of froglets, and has a nice collection, to say "put it in a shoebox" and only look at them when you feed them.

-Tad
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
tad604 said:
Besides your going to want to watch them and enjoy them, putting them in a "shoe box" is counter to this.
Its really easy for someone who has raised up plenty of froglets, and has a nice collection, to say "put it in a shoebox" and only look at them when you feed them.

-Tad
very true.
 

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I personally started with a very large tank, and have not regretted it. However, I did raise the frogs in a 5 or 10 gallon until I thought they were large enough and hardy enough to forage for themselves in the larger tank. Go for it, you won't be disappointed in going big!
 
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