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I currently only have Leucs. I've kept aurotaenia, auratus, bicolor and imitator in the past
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The wood is mopani, should hold up just fine yeah?
Mopani is one of the best rot resistant woods, it should last you a very long time.

Since you are removing the spider plant anyways, I would suggest moving the rabbit's foot fern in the front right to the spot that the spider plant will be vacating. That way it isnt getting in your way when you are dumping in fruit flies in the future.
 

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I currently only have Leucs. I've kept aurotaenia, auratus, bicolor and imitator in the past
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1,459 Posts
I honestly hadn’t really thought about it until you mentioned. Why do you ask?
I'm not Tijl but I can answer your question. Because bromeliad rosettes open upwards, towards the sky to catch sun and rain in nature. Too much of an angle looks unnatural and wont allow the plants to hold much water in their urns. Even as the plants blindly send out stolons to pup from, the new pups always attempt to orient themselves facing the sky if they have the space to do so, no matter what angle relative to the mother plant the stolon ran. The only time that you would see broms oriented how you oriented them is when a colony of clones is crowded to the point of forming a spherical shape, but only the pups on the bottom of the colony would be oriented that way. The rest would be oriented upwards.
Images from a google search:



 

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I currently only have Leucs. I've kept aurotaenia, auratus, bicolor and imitator in the past
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1,459 Posts
Ok…got it. You guys could’ve just said so instead of being all cute about it 🙄 Will the plants really suffer being at a 45 degree angle though? I see lots of setups that are many years old with their bromeliads at a similar angle
I didn't see it as big enough of an issue to risk offending you by pointing it out. Broms will survive growing at an odd angle, they just won't grow optimally and will be dehydrated without full urns. I prefer to only offer constructive criticism if something about a newbie's first build could cause problems for them or their frogs. If you had ranitomeya rather than dendrobates, I, as well as everyone else, would have said something.

I see…I’ll have to play with them to see if I can orient some vertically but doubt I can do all of them that way.

I am at work so I can't offer a picture, but look up the X toothpick trick or make a U shape out of a paper clip. Hopefully someone can chime in with an example soon.

Edit: I do have a pic on my phone:
Plant Terrestrial plant Rectangle Grass Natural material
 

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I currently only have Leucs. I've kept aurotaenia, auratus, bicolor and imitator in the past
Joined
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1,459 Posts
I see…I’ll have to play with them to see if I can orient some vertically but doubt I can do all of them that way. Is this just a question of being naturalistic or is it harmful to the plant/less useful to the frogs or something if oriented this way?
This was helpful, thank you. Re-oriented my bromeliads easily using this trick.

Any other glaring mistakes people noticed but chose not to point out?
I'm glad it was a quick and easy fix. The broms roots will grab the background and then you will be able to remove the toothpicks.

No other mistakes that I can see. You really did do a really good job with your first build. Don't worry too much about a couple of broms. I would rather overlook a quirky brom angle and have you stay in the hobby than make you feel like we are all laughing at you for how you happened to place something in your tank. The fern would have been annoying to you in the future when it is bigger and you are trying to dump in flies, so I let you know. The broms are just decoration (since you dont have frogs that will use them) and are out of the way, so how you had them wasn't an issue. This hobby has a learning curve and despite the fact that we are often our own worst critics, a lot of people are proud of their work and are resistant to being told that they did something incorrectly. Spend some time here and you will see what I mean the 81st time that you see a newbie trying to build a waterfall in their first 10 gallon vivarium. It is best to just allow people to travel the learning curve at their own pace as long as they and their frogs wont suffer as they do so. You would have noticed the difference between your brom placement and other people's once you spent more time looking at other people's builds or once you got interested in the parental activities of thumbnail species.
 

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I currently only have Leucs. I've kept aurotaenia, auratus, bicolor and imitator in the past
Joined
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1,459 Posts
I’ve had the frogs for a week and they were shy at first but seem like they’re settling in well, starting to climb and forage and get up to goofy stuff while I’m around.
This is why Leucs are my longest kept species and the one that I always recommend to newbies. Despite not being the species that brought me into the hobby or the first species that I ended up buying once I was ready to own frogs, Leucs are just so goofy and active that they are permanently endearing.

Based on feedback here and research over the past month I’ve decided to build up and grow out an 18x18x24 for these guys then down the line use this enclosure for a smaller species (front runner currently is Ranitomeya imitator “Varadero,” or possibly some sort of obligate). Do you guys have advice as far as that plan goes? I’m not planning on making this transition for 6 months or so, but will get the new tank planning going soon and give the new one a pretty good amount of time to grow out.
I'm sure you will get more opinions from others but I personally don't reuse anything that I can not bleach or bake or pressure cook unless it has been 100% frog free. I don't know how long frog parasites or bacteria can last in a moist vivarium or even in a desiccated state and for my own peace of mind I don't cross contaminate when I have more than one vivarium with frogs. A parasite/bacteria that one species is fine with might cause issues in another when under stress. That being said, I do know that people have moved frogs into vivariums that previously housed others without issue.
 
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