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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I have been battling fire ants in my imitator tank. They are not getting in there. There is no sign of a line of ants coming or going outside of the tank. They have a small established colony in there. Whenever I add fruit flies the ants run out and start grabbing fruit flies.

I have tried baiting them with boric acid and sugar. No interest. Boric acid and crushed up dog kibble seems to be taken readily and diminishes their numbers greatly. Just when I think I have killed them off they come back in a few days.

I have not removed the frogs. I keep thinking that I have the ants beat and I'm out of the water. Then I find ants again. I know they pose a real danger to the frogs. I currently have them knocked back pretty well but any good ideas about how to finish the job?

I'm pretty good at pest control but my hands are somewhat tied here. Anyone had success killing an ant colony in an established vivarium?
 

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Dendrobates Leucomelas
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Weapon of last resort. I was given this information for a snail infestation. But I believe it would work on these monsters. The problem with fire ants is they will have multiple queens. Nip it now before they get established.

The only effective way I was able to get rid of them was when I used CO2. You may need to bomb them several times to kill newly hatch juveniles because slug and snail eggs can survive CO2, but newly hatched or adult slugs and snail cannot survive CO2. My tanks are slug free only because of CO2 bombing.

Note: CO2 will may take down your tank isopods and some springtales populations. But these can be repopulated after you take down the bad guys.


Here is the article of how to use CO2 effectively.

Building and using a CO2 generator"

 

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However it feels like the real way to actually get rid of an ant colony is to find and kill the queen / eggs. I'm surprised that your boric acid bait (assuming the ants carry that off) hasn't impacted that in some way...

Other than that, yes CO2 is the best option...
 

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Dendrobates Leucomelas
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Maybe good old fashion Amdro. Or scalding hot water on the nest.
As long as there is a food source they have it made and in no time take over the view. They have three basic needs; food, water, and shelter and the ants have all 3

If possible I would remove the frogs, rinse off the plants in a chlorine water mixture. If possible and remove as much substrate as possible.

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I'm surprised that your boric acid bait (assuming the ants carry that off) hasn't impacted that in some way...
It has had a significant effect on the number of ants. The bait I was using was the issue. Sugar vs. crushed dog food.
 

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I think I'd remove the frogs and any sensitive plants and then do some CO2 bombs. You need to research how long it takes the eggs to gestate. So do it once and then do it again when those eggs should be hatching. Maybe do it one more time a few days later and then inspect before adding plants and frogs back.
 
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It has had a significant effect on the number of ants. The bait I was using was the issue. Sugar vs. crushed dog food.
Ah, so now they are gone? Very interesting - I know bees only feed their queen royal jelly (or something along those line) so wonder if there is something similar for ants...
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Ah, so now they are gone? Very interesting - I know bees only feed their queen royal jelly (or something along those line) so wonder if there is something similar for ants...
Nope. I'm still fighting them. There is far fewer of them with consistent boric acid baiting. But, they are still present. There seems to be a trend. I knock them back, think they are gone, stop baiting and they come back.
 

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Nope. I'm still fighting them. There is far fewer of them with consistent boric acid baiting. But, they are still present. There seems to be a trend. I knock them back, think they are gone, stop baiting and they come back.
If it feels like the baiting is working then I'd just keep adding the boric acid for at least a month after you stop seeing them. It could be that eggs are hatching and you've stopped baiting by the time they get out of their larval stage.
 
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